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Article

Helle Lohmann Rasmussen and Per Anker Jensen

The gap between the expected and actual performance of newly built facilities has been widely described in the literature as “the performance gap”. Mostly, the performance…

Abstract

Purpose

The gap between the expected and actual performance of newly built facilities has been widely described in the literature as “the performance gap”. Mostly, the performance gap appears to be synonymous with the energy performance gap. Little attention has been given to other performance aspects that facilities managers recognise as deficient in newly built or renovated buildings like for instance difficulties in operation and maintenance. This study contributes with a typology of performance gaps, with the aim to offer a more nuanced understanding of the term, where the interests of facilities management are in focus.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical data consist of four in-depth interviews, two focus group interviews and three workshops. Except for one workshop, the data collection took place in Denmark.

Findings

The study identifies 12 types of performance gaps of which “higher energy consumption” is one. The gaps are interdependent and initiatives to reduce one type of gap can potentially lead to an increase in another. Furthermore, the study finds that the fatal (the most critical) gap is context-specific.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study imply a need to change the way we previously have discussed the early involvement of the facilities management in design. The study shows that more involvement of FM is not necessarily better.

Originality/value

This paper is the first attempt to cover performance gaps of buildings from a holistic viewpoint and from the perspective of FM.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management , vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

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Article

Helle Lohmann Rasmussen, Per Anker Jensen, Susanne Balslev Nielsen and Anders Højen Kristiansen

This paper aims to focus on deliberate actions by the building client to integrate knowledge of facilities management, in particular building operation, in design and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on deliberate actions by the building client to integrate knowledge of facilities management, in particular building operation, in design and construction of sustainable facilities. Examples of current practices are studied to answer the following questions: Which initiatives to enable operational friendly and sustainable buildings are currently used by building clients in Denmark? Which initiatives could be appropriate to use in the future, and which parties are in the best position to implement the various initiatives?

Design/methodology/approach

The study is a hermeneutic multi-method study, which consists of a review of former research, a case study and a survey. It starts with theoretical background based on earlier research with the aim to identify initiatives to ensure the use of operational knowledge in building design. Hereafter, the paper presents, analyses and discusses two studies: a case study of current practices at a university campus organisation and a survey of five swimming facilities. All cases are from Denmark.

Findings

In all, 31 initiatives to enable use of operational knowledge in building design were initially identified. In the case study, 11 additional initiatives were found. The case study and the survey of swimming facilities show different degrees of implementation, varying from 18 to 31 initiatives implemented. However, the studies show that introducing the initiatives is not sufficient; it takes deliberate actions to get the initiatives well implemented. Within the building client organisation, three main actors should care for implementing the initiatives: Top management, building client division and operation division.

Originality/value

Research-based literature on practices in relation to knowledge transfer from operation to design is limited. This paper provides insights into deliberate efforts on transferring knowledge from operation to design among Danish building clients.

Details

Facilities, vol. 37 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article

Helle Lohmann Rasmussen

For optimising long-term building operations, building clients need to enable integration of operational knowledge in the design process of new buildings. This study aims…

Abstract

Purpose

For optimising long-term building operations, building clients need to enable integration of operational knowledge in the design process of new buildings. This study aims to investigate and compare how operational knowledge is integrated into the design of buildings and large ships, focussing on the roles affiliation and the competences of the client’s project manager play.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional qualitative methodology with multiple case studies (five cases) was used. In addition, ten expert interviews and two validation focus group interviews were conducted. Case studies included in-depth interviews, document analysis and observations.

Findings

The study showed that organisational affiliation, focus and competences of the client’s project management play an important role in how much effort and resources go into ensuring integration of operational knowledge in the design process. In the ship cases, projects managers’ highest concerns were operations. Yet, the fewest procedures and tools to integrate operational knowledge in design were found implemented in these cases. Contrastingly, in the building cases, where operations were not the main matter of concern of project management, a large number of procedures and tools to integrate operational knowledge in design were implemented.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this research is the first to compare how integration of operational knowledge is taking place in the design process of buildings and large ships and identifying what these industries can learn from each other. Furthermore, it adds to the limited research on operations in large ship design.

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Article

Per Anker Jensen, Helle Lohmann Rasmussen and Stamatia Chatzilazarou

This paper aims to investigate how knowledge concerning operation and maintenance of buildings can be stored and transferred between the parties responsible for building…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how knowledge concerning operation and maintenance of buildings can be stored and transferred between the parties responsible for building operation and new building projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is theoretically based on knowledge management with a particular focus on interdepartmental knowledge transfer between departments responsible for operation and maintenance and departments responsible for building projects in organisations with large and fast changing building portfolios. The paper includes a case study of the facilities management organisation of the Technical University of Denmark with data collection mainly by interviews with managers and staff in the relevant departments in this organisation.

Findings

The case organisation seems to be aware of the importance of sharing and transferring their organisational knowledge. Over the past five years, the organisation has developed different tools and adopted several processes, aiming at integration of the knowledge they possess from many years of operation and maintenance of the existing buildings. However, there are many situations, where the tools and processes do not work efficiently, and therefore the knowledge transfer is not sufficiently effective. It is apparent that the best results can be achieved only if the different actors involved in a construction project collaborate aiming towards the same objectives.

Originality/value

The paper presents and evaluates a case of interdepartmental knowledge transfer in an organisation, which has a strong focus on improving the interconnections between building operations and planning new building projects.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Facilities, vol. 39 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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