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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Helene Hill

Based on in‐depth primary research with a key strategic manager within Co‐op Switzerland, a store visit, and secondary data this case outlines the core factors influencing…

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1437

Abstract

Based on in‐depth primary research with a key strategic manager within Co‐op Switzerland, a store visit, and secondary data this case outlines the core factors influencing the devised marketing strategy, both at a micro and macro level. The company marketing policy is then presented alongside the issues affecting how this policy was implemented. Final consideration is given to the role of the own brand developed to fit the company philosophy of being ecological, innovative and consumer focused.

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British Food Journal, vol. 100 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Helene Hill and Jennifer Tilley

Based on primary research from both a child consumer and manufacturer perspective, this article explores the breakfast cereal market and the perceptions of packaging from…

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8644

Abstract

Based on primary research from both a child consumer and manufacturer perspective, this article explores the breakfast cereal market and the perceptions of packaging from the perspective of a child. Specific consideration is given to determining the overall role of packaging, what role packaging can play within integrated marketing communications and establishing the feasibility and effectiveness of packaging as a sole communications tool. Findings highlight some apparent inconsistencies between manufacturer and children’s views, and illustrate the possibility of adults underestimating how aware children are as consumers in today’s society.

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British Food Journal, vol. 104 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Craig Haslop, Helene Hill and Ruth A. Schmidt

Presents a study of designated gay service environments. Conceptually, the study draws together ideas and frameworks from the consumption literature and from the study of…

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6180

Abstract

Presents a study of designated gay service environments. Conceptually, the study draws together ideas and frameworks from the consumption literature and from the study of service environments. Analyses issues surrounding gay cultural socialization and its effect on consumption patterns and expression through service environments. The study of the interplay between gay subculture and servicescapes is grounded in qualitative and observational data through field work conducted in the Manchester “gay village”. Findings indicate that communitas, individualism and diversity are key facets of the subculture, with bars being used as individual expressions of identity, moods and emotions. Other influences on consumption patterns include interpersonal interaction with friends, the hetero‐ and homosexual cultural interface, and the ambience of the service environment. Discusses implications for the service marketer, such as the application of marketing models to the creation of servicescapes which reflect and suit the subcultures they are designed for; and raises issues for marketing methodology by noting the value of consumption‐based research in creating a picture of the “gay” lifestyle.

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Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Marlo Thomas and Helene Hill

Presents results on the issue of developing and implementing a corporate identity strategy when going international, and the potential implications of having an…

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3356

Abstract

Presents results on the issue of developing and implementing a corporate identity strategy when going international, and the potential implications of having an ethnocentric approach. Based on a Jamaican financial services case study, reflects the key debates found across the hierarchical organisation structure. The key issues raised include the corporate strategy to facilitate improved future performance, the decision making process for standardisation, the choice of visual imagery and slogans, the role of the recruitment policy in the strategy, and the role of front‐line staff in achieving a successful outcome to this strategy. All of these issues are discussed alongside the impact of an ethnocentric approach.

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International Marketing Review, vol. 16 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Helene Hill and Fidelma Lynchehaun

This article considers consumer attitudes and motivation towards organic food, and milk specifically. This is then linked to the resulting purchase behaviour. Based on a…

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11362

Abstract

This article considers consumer attitudes and motivation towards organic food, and milk specifically. This is then linked to the resulting purchase behaviour. Based on a combination of secondary and primary research, the results indicate the dynamics between these concepts. The resulting discussion highlights the importance of the associated internal and external factors within this area, and their impact for marketing managers.

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British Food Journal, vol. 104 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2019

Hélène Sicotte, Andrée De Serres, Hélène Delerue and Virginie Ménard

The purpose of this paper is to further explore the relationship between new product development project teams and their workspace regarding the impact of the physical…

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1071

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to further explore the relationship between new product development project teams and their workspace regarding the impact of the physical (space variety, indoor environmental quality, large meeting room, workstation) and sociotechnical environments (project commitment, IT environment) on their creativity and effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors gathered data on an enterprise’s ten multidisciplinary teams operating in diverse workspaces by four means: over 40 interviews and four months of observation, secondary data and a survey with 645 responses.

Findings

For teams co-located on site and abroad, employees express that proximity in open space is paramount even considering the augmented density. The relationship between team effectiveness and team creativity is strong and bidirectional (correlationβ = 0.40****), but the patterns of relationship between these two variables and certain dimensions of the physical and sociotechnical environment are different. There is a positive and direct impact on team effectiveness, but to a lesser degree on creativity which, in turn, positively influences team effectiveness. Moreover, creativity intervenes (mediator variable) between project commitment, satisfaction with large meeting rooms and the IT environment on their relationship with team effectiveness. When the authors added a direct link between the variables and team effectiveness, the model explains 47.1 per cent of the variance.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of the data is somewhat limited by the time that the company and its teams could allocate to this paper.

Practical implications

The arrangement of space reinforces employees’ sense of belonging to their team as measured by project commitment which along with satisfaction with the large meeting rooms and IT environment influence both team effectiveness and creativity. Managers could consider these three elements as levers for action. Space variety (or balanced layout) is also a way to support team creativity.

Originality/value

Even if open spaces are frequently used, the literature on creative spaces is dedicated mainly to an individual. This paper delivers some results and evidence on the concrete and simultaneous impacts of the workspaces on creativity and effectiveness of multidisciplinary new product development (NPD) team.

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Journal of Corporate Real Estate , vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2018

Pierre-Luc Fournier and Marie-Hélène Jobin

The purpose of this paper is to study the factors influencing doctors’ involvement in Lean change initiatives in public healthcare organizations in Canada.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the factors influencing doctors’ involvement in Lean change initiatives in public healthcare organizations in Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

An inductive research was conducted over a three-year span studying Lean implementation across three healthcare organizations in Canada. Various interviews were conducted with healthcare actors. Through analytical induction, analysis of the data allowed for multiple factors to be triangulated from which a conceptual model was developed.

Findings

Fifty-four interviews with 18 Lean healthcare actors allowed for the identification of ten factors possibly influencing the commitment of doctors towards Lean change. These factors are categorized into pre-change antecedents and change antecedents. Also, the level of transformational leadership demonstrated by a project manager was shown to potentially moderate the effect of medical behavioral support for change on change outcomes. These findings allowed us to develop a conceptual model of medical commitment and its impact of Lean change outcomes.

Originality/value

The paper investigates the role doctors play in Lean implementation, currently an important issue discussed among healthcare actors and researchers. Yet, very little academic research has been published on this subject.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Robin Schaeverbeke, Hélène Aarts and Ann Heylighen

Teaching drawing in architectural education raises questions regarding the representation of spatial experiences: to what extent can sensory experiences of space be…

Abstract

Teaching drawing in architectural education raises questions regarding the representation of spatial experiences: to what extent can sensory experiences of space be intensified through observing and drawing and, perhaps equally important, what those drawings would look like?

In the context of their drawing classes, the authors started to inquire the discrepancy between conceiving and perceiving space, and the aptitude of representing spatial concepts upon a two dimensional surface. Through observation and translating observation into drawings, students discover that conventionalised ways of drawing, such as linear perspective, only reveal part of the story. While linear perspective remains the dominant way of representing space, obviously visible in photography, film, 3D-imaging and architectural impressions, the authors started looking for ways of drawing which inquire possibilities of expressing spatial experiences. Drawing as an activity which is able to enhance spatial understanding, rather than as a tool to communicate virtual spaces. Next to drawing as a ‘skill’, which can be learnt, the drawing classes started to inquire non-visual aspects of space by analysing attributes of spatiality, which are difficult to convey through two dimensional drawings.

Starting from a contextualisation of spatial drawing within architectural practice, the article examines the discrepancy between geometric space and lived space, in order to reveal the dubious role of linear perspective within (architectural) culture and history. After a brief return to how we imagined and represented space in our childhood, the article presents a series of practice based examples. Drawing on the authors’ teaching practice, it illustrates possibilities to expand our visual language by exploring space and spatiality through observing and drawing.

Details

Open House International, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2018

Hélène Henry and Donatienne Desmette

In the context of workforce aging, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of occupational future time perspective (OFTP) in the relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

In the context of workforce aging, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of occupational future time perspective (OFTP) in the relationship between work–family enrichment (WF-E) and two well-being outcomes (i.e. work engagement and emotional exhaustion). In addition, the moderating role of age on the relationship between WF-E and OFTP, and consequently, on the indirect effects of WF-E on work engagement and emotional exhaustion through OFTP, will be examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional survey research (n=263) was conducted in a public sector company in Belgium. Structural equation modeling and bootstrap analyses were performed to investigate the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

The dimension “remaining opportunities” of OFTP mediated the positive relationship between WFE and work engagement, and the negative relationship between WFE and emotional exhaustion. Chronological age moderated the positive relationship between WFE and the dimension “remaining time” of OFTP, with stronger effects among older workers.

Research limitations/implications

This research has confirmed that OFTP is influenced by WFE and that WFE matters, especially for older workers. Future research should continue to study the effects of the work–family interface on older workers.

Practical implications

Age management practices should take WFE into consideration when managing an aging workforce. In particular, older workers may benefit from WFE to increase their perception of remaining opportunities at work, which, in turn, increase well-being.

Originality/value

This study contributes evidence for the role of personal resources (i.e. remaining opportunities) in the relationship between WF-E and well-being at work.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 23 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Anthony Beudaert, Hélène Gorge and Maud Herbert

The purpose of this study is both to explore how people with “hidden” auditory disorders experience exclusion in servicescapes and to unfold the coping strategies they set…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is both to explore how people with “hidden” auditory disorders experience exclusion in servicescapes and to unfold the coping strategies they set up to deal with it.

Design/methodology/approach

Findings from 15 semi-structured interviews and participant observations with individuals suffering from auditory disorders are presented through the paper.

Findings

The findings indicate that individuals with auditory disorders deploy three types of coping strategies when exposed to sensory overload in servicescapes: choosing between physical servicescapes, opting for electronic devices and e-servicescapes and delegating shopping to relatives.

Practical implications

The study underlines how, through temporary or permanent modifications of servicescape cues, service providers give consumers opportunities to bypass situations involving sensory overload. Implications for e-servicescapes and public policy are also raised.

Originality/value

The findings reveal how the coping strategies used by individuals with auditory disorders contribute to their exclusion from the marketplace on the basis of both individual characteristics and types of servicescapes.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 31 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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