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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2020

Fiona Cust, Helen Combes, Helena Priest and Henry Cust

Previous research has explored inter-professional education (IPE) in mental health contexts, for example, between mental health nurses and clinical psychologists (CPs)…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has explored inter-professional education (IPE) in mental health contexts, for example, between mental health nurses and clinical psychologists (CPs). However, little research has explored IPE with children’s nurses (CNs) and CPs, who often work together in a range of in-patient and community mental health settings. Indeed, a significant proportion of CNs’ work involves identifying and responding to the mental health needs of children, young people and families; equally, CPs work directly into child teams, and their consultancy work requires awareness of other professional roles. However, knowledge and understanding of roles, and true collaborative working, appears to be limited. This study aimed to address these limitations.

Design/methodology/approach

A project was designed to bring together these two groups in an educational context, to explore ways in which collaborative working may enable effective mental health-care delivery. A total of 17 children’s nursing students and 15 clinical psychology trainees participated in a 3-day workshop, including experiential and clinical vignette work. Workshops were evaluated at three time points, using a questionnaire.

Findings

The workshops were effective in improving knowledge, skills and understanding of roles. Teamwork and discussions were helpful in modifying attitudes and perceptions. However, “defensiveness” was an important theme, demonstrating somewhat fixed beliefs about roles in relation to child mental health care.

Originality/value

Few studies have explored IPE in child mental health contexts, especially in the pre-qualification arena.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 19 February 2018

Andrew Stott and Helena Priest

Existing literature has examined what recovery means to people with co-occurring difficulties, but does little to examine experiences of recovery as a process. The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

Existing literature has examined what recovery means to people with co-occurring difficulties, but does little to examine experiences of recovery as a process. The purpose of this paper is to use a narrative approach to explore the process of recovery as an individual journey in a social context. It focuses on people who use alcohol in order to explore the impact of alcohol’s specific cultural meanings on the recovery journey.

Design/methodology/approach

Ten interviews with people with coexisting mental health and alcohol misuse difficulties were conducted, audio-recorded, and transcribed. The transcriptions were analysed using narrative analysis.

Findings

Most participants’ narratives shared a three-part structure, from a traumatic past, through an episode of change, to an ongoing recovery phase. Change and recovery were attributed to several factors including flexible and practical support from services, therapeutic relationships with key professionals, and peer support. Some participants redefined themselves and their alcohol use in relation to ideas of what it is to be “normal”.

Research limitations/implications

The research excluded people who recover outside of services, replicating a shortcoming of much research in this area.

Practical implications

The value placed on professionals having specialised therapeutic skills in working with trauma highlights the need for training in this area. The role for practical and material support underlines the importance of multi-agency working.

Originality/value

The narrative methodology enables the study to draw links between personal stories of recovery and wider social influences, allowing comment on the implications for services. Further, the experiences of people with coexisting mental health and alcohol misuse difficulties have rarely been studied apart from the dual diagnosis population in general, so this paper is able to investigate the specific challenges for this population.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2017

Gulshan Tajuria, Sue Read and Helena M. Priest

People with intellectual disabilities experiencing loss or bereavement are at risk of developing additional mental health problems, and may struggle to access suitable…

Abstract

Purpose

People with intellectual disabilities experiencing loss or bereavement are at risk of developing additional mental health problems, and may struggle to access suitable support. The purpose of this paper is to present the adaptations done while using Photovoice as a creative method for bereaved people with intellectual disabilities participating in a research exploring loss and support. This paper will further briefly add information on how the use of Photovoice supported the development of whole research project.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores the use of Photovoice as a method of research engagement for bereaved adults with intellectual disabilities. Photovoice enables participants to take and discuss photographs illustrating their loss and support experiences. The paper focusses on a preparatory Photovoice workshop with the research participants, outlining the processes and activities used to maximise involvement, promote learning and achieve shared understanding.

Findings

Preparation was the key to the effectiveness of this workshop and it recommends that appropriate adaptions are useful in Photovoice with adults with intellectual disabilities effectively. The paper outlines principles of good practice for using Photovoice in this research context, which may transfer to other similar research settings. Using Photovoice facilitated later one-to-one interviews with the participants, where their photographs were discussed together.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates the innovative use of Photovoice methodology in research involving bereaved people with intellectual disabilities. Photovoice has not previously been used with this specific population within the bereavement and loss context, so this paper adds to the developing evidence base.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 11 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Helena Priest, Paula Roberts, Helen Dent, Tom Hunt, Dale Weston, Amy Chell, Christine Blincoe and Christine Armstrong

Effective interprofessional working is widely claimed to enhance service delivery, user satisfaction, and most importantly, clinical outcomes. Achieving this position is…

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Abstract

Purpose

Effective interprofessional working is widely claimed to enhance service delivery, user satisfaction, and most importantly, clinical outcomes. Achieving this position is proving difficult. Research suggests that strategies to enhance interprofessional collaboration should begin at the earliest possible opportunity to prevent negative stereotypes from developing. This project was an attempt to develop effective interprofessional education (IPE) across staff groups who work in the mental health arena (mental health nursing students and clinical psychology trainees).

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were whole cohorts of undergraduate mental health nursing students (n=11) in their second year of training (at the commencement of their “branch” programme), and trainees on the doctorate in clinical psychology (n=10) at the start of their first year of training. IPE sessions were facilitated by mental health nursing and clinical psychology academic staff and clinicians. Activities included creative group work and problem‐based learning. Seven sessions were delivered across over a 2 year period.

Findings

Qualitative and quantitative data from this two year project showed an increase in positive attitudes towards professionals from each profession over a two year period, though no overall improvement. Qualitative analysis of participant comments provided more encouraging support for improvement in attitudes, within the theme areas of teamwork and collaboration, professional identity, and roles and responsibilities. Overall, the project provided important information on building positive attitudes within the mental health workforce, while identifying challenges that need to be anticipated and addressed.

Originality/value

Few studies have explored IPE in mental health contexts, especially in the pre‐qualification arena.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2014

Ann Kilanska and Helena M. Priest

Previous studies have shown that support workers often have difficulties in recognising mental health problems in service users with intellectual disabilities. In the…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies have shown that support workers often have difficulties in recognising mental health problems in service users with intellectual disabilities. In the context of improved UK training programmes, the purpose of this paper is to explore the factors that can predict support workers’ knowledge and confidence in this respect.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 80 support workers (40 residential and 40 community-based) completed a questionnaire about their length of work experience, exposure to service users with additional mental health needs, training, general and specific mental health knowledge, and confidence in working with mental health issues. It was hypothesised that length of work experience, extent of training, and level of exposure would predict knowledge about mental health problems, and also predict confidence in working with people with mental health problems. It was further predicted that residential support workers would be more knowledgeable and confident than community workers.

Findings

Results showed that level of exposure could predict knowledge about schizophrenia, but not about depression, anxiety, or dementia, while length of experience could predict overall mental health knowledge and confidence. Extent of training could only predict knowledge about anxiety, and work setting (residential or community) had no effect to on knowledge or confidence. Implications for practice and training are discussed.

Originality/value

In the context of improved UK training programmes, this study aimed to explore the factors that can predict support workers’ knowledge and confidence in this respect.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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126

Abstract

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Ian Yates, Guy Holmes and Helena Priest

This paper seeks to discuss recent research concerning the subjective experience of recovery from severe mental health difficulties, with the aim of appraising the extent…

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297

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to discuss recent research concerning the subjective experience of recovery from severe mental health difficulties, with the aim of appraising the extent to which this literature has attended to the role of environmental and social conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

Following an overview of research focusing on environmental and social conditions and mental health generally, a focused literature review was undertaken to analyse gaps within the recovery literature, specifically in relation to the importance of environmental or social contexts. Thematic analysis was used to derive salient themes from this literature. Research methodologies are appraised with regards to the extent to which they are congruent with an examination of the context of recovery.

Findings

A total of 11 papers relating to the impact of place or context on recovery were reviewed. Key themes identified were: the relationship between place, social context, and identity; safety and security; social connectedness; and contradictory impacts of the mental health system. The authors argue that recent qualitative research has over emphasised the subjective experience of recovery at the expense of a rich description of the place in which research is conducted. This approach dislocates recovery from its geographical location and the wider political and economic system in which it occurs.

Originality/value

A gap is identified within the current literature concerning recovery from severe mental health difficulties. In order to better understand the environmental factors that contribute to recovery, research needs to include rich descriptions of place, i.e. the physical and social environment as situated within the wider political and economic context.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2013

Daniel L. Herron and Helena M. Priest

It is widely acknowledged that people with intellectual disabilities are highly likely to experience mental health problems, but that support workers' knowledge and skill…

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732

Abstract

Purpose

It is widely acknowledged that people with intellectual disabilities are highly likely to experience mental health problems, but that support workers' knowledge and skill in this area is sometimes lacking. There is little research explicitly exploring knowledge about the mental health of older people with intellectual disabilities and the purpose of this paper is to attempt to fill this gap.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 14 support workers completed a questionnaire in which three vignettes presented progressively worsening indicators of dementia in an older person with intellectual disabilities. Participants explained what they thought was happening and what action they would take. Data were analysed using Braun and Clarke's framework.

Findings

Few participants had undertaken any mental health training, and only one in relation to older people. They were generally poor at judging early and intermediate indicators of dementia, but were able to identify more overt later signs. However, they believed these advanced indicators to be the onset of dementia. Nonetheless, they would generally take appropriate action, such as observation and referral. Abuse was often considered as a causal factor.

Practical implications

The most significant implication is the need for training in the mental health needs of older people and in particular, the general and specific indicators and expected trajectory of dementia in this population.

Originality/value

The study adds to the limited research on staff knowledge about older people with intellectual disabilities and dementia, using a novel methodology.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Marta Helena de Freitas and Benedito Rodrigues dos Santos

The purpose of this paper is to address the relations between religiosity and mental health (MH) among the immigrants living in Brasília, as per the perceptions of MH…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the relations between religiosity and mental health (MH) among the immigrants living in Brasília, as per the perceptions of MH service professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

It is grounded in empirical qualitative research based on semi-structured interviews with 12 professionals – six psychiatrists and six psychologists working in MH services throughout Brasília. The experiences and perceptions of these professionals were analysed in the light of phenomenological assumptions, and temporally situated in the historical context of the construction of Brazil’s capital city.

Findings

Results show that these professionals recognize the importance of immigrant support services paying attention to issues of religiosity connected to those of MH, in spite of never having received training on the theme in their qualification course work. They are critical of the oppressive aspects of some religions, but recognize the predominance of positive effects of religiosity.

Research limitations/implications

Albeit exploratory by nature, and with a limited number of study subjects, the study opens the way for more in-depth investigations of this rarely addressed MH issue and recommends its application to greater numbers of professionals and other contexts.

Practical implications

The results can contribute to the MH policy decision-making processes for the immigrant population in Brasília and also for training the professionals working in providing care for this population.

Social implications

To contribute to the development of a new MH model in which professionals can adopt a more open posture in regard to the traditional pathologizing models used to address the question of religious phenomena.

Originality/value

Albeit exploratory in nature, this study makes a contribution by opening the way for the issue of religiosity and its impacts on MH to become the object of more in-depth investigations conducted from a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary perspective, targeting greater numbers of MH professionals and extended to other internal and external migratory contexts.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Margaret Kennedy

This paper examines themes that emerge from supporting adults who have been sexually violated by Church ministers and clergy. The author suggests that despite obstacles…

Abstract

This paper examines themes that emerge from supporting adults who have been sexually violated by Church ministers and clergy. The author suggests that despite obstacles put in place by churches of all denominations, victims are beginning to speak out.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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