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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2020

Helena Kraff and Eva Maria Jernsand

The purpose of this paper is to explore the roles of work integration social enterprises (WISEs) in the Swedish establishment programme for newly arrived refugees, and how…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the roles of work integration social enterprises (WISEs) in the Swedish establishment programme for newly arrived refugees, and how its set-up affects WISEs preconditions for social innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper builds on a longitudinal and qualitative action research study of a WISE and its work in organising a course for labour market integration, in the context of the Swedish establishment programme. The authors were actively involved in the study as embedded researchers.

Findings

The exploration identifies a number of roles that WISEs take on in the establishment programme. It illustrates how WISEs hybrid character places participants at the centre of the innovation process, where their opinions and knowledge are considered crucial, and how this positively affects their ability to gain skills and confidence. However, the study also makes visible how issues of coordination between stakeholders in the programme lead to mismatches between course content and participant profiles, colliding activities and sporadic participation. In short, the bureaucracy embedded in labour market integration systems erodes the preconditions of WISEs to foster social innovation.

Originality/value

The embeddedness of the authors provides in-depth knowledge regarding how complex state systems affect WISEs in practice. Importantly, it also gives insights into the experiences of refugees, a group that is often mentioned in the literature on WISEs, although mainly in passing.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2022

Jessica A. Harris, Julia Carins, Sharyn Rundle-Thiele and Patricia David

The purpose of this study is to respond to calls to increase levels of theory application and extend understanding beyond individuals ensuring social and structural…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to respond to calls to increase levels of theory application and extend understanding beyond individuals ensuring social and structural environmental considerations are taken into account. Social cognitive theory (SCT) was applied across two settings to examine its potential to explain breakfast eating frequency.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey was conducted in two institutional feeding populations [military (n = 314) and mining (n = 235)]. Participants reported key SCT constructs including breakfast eating behaviour (self-efficacy, skills, practice), cognitive aspects (knowledge, attitude, expectations) and their perceptions regarding environmental constructs (access, social norms, influence). These were measured and analysed through SPSS and structural equation modelling (SEM).

Findings

Results indicated that 71% males and 90% females in the military do not eat breakfast at work, and in the mining, 23% males and 24% of females do not eat breakfast at work. Furthermore, SEM modelling found only a satisfactory fit for SCT as operationalised in this study. Within the models, behavioural aspects of self-efficacy, skills and practice were significant influences on breakfast eating. Cognitive influences and perceptions of environmental influences exerted little to no effect on breakfast eating. Study results indicate that SCT, as measured in this study using a selection of environment, cognitive and behavioural constructs, does not offer sufficient explanatory potential to explain breakfast eating behaviour.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is to deliver a complete application of Social Cognitive Theory, ensuring multiple constructs are measured to examine the explanatory behaviour of breakfast eating frequency in workplace institutional settings.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

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