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Article

Andrea Begley, Danielle Gallegos and Helen Vidgen

The purpose of this paper is to assess the effectiveness of cooking skill interventions (CSIs) targeting adults to improve dietary intakes in public health nutrition settings.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the effectiveness of cooking skill interventions (CSIs) targeting adults to improve dietary intakes in public health nutrition settings.

Design/methodology/approach

A scoping review of the literature was used to identify and assess the quality and effectiveness of Australian single-strategy CSIs and multi-strategy programmes that included cooking for independent healthy people older than 16 years from 1992 to 2015.

Findings

There were only 15 interventions (n=15) identified for review and included CSIs as single strategies (n=8) or as part of multi-strategy programmes (n=7) over 23 years. The majority of the interventions were rated as weak in quality (66 per cent) due to their study design, lack of control groups, lack of validated evaluation measures and small sample sizes. Just over half (53 per cent) of the CSIs reviewed described some measurement related to improved dietary behaviours.

Research limitations/implications

There is inconclusive evidence that CSIs are effective in changing dietary behaviours in Australia. However, they are valued by policymakers and practitioners and used in public health nutrition programmes, particularly for indigenous groups.

Originality/value

This is the first time that CSIs have been reviewed in an Australian context and they provide evidence of the critical need to improve the quality CSIs to positively influence dietary behaviour change in Australia.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article

Helen Hasan and Henry Linger

Abstract

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article

Andrew Cox

A new vehicle for user instruction in academic libraries could be a hypertext library guide distributed on the World Wide Web. This article considers the advantages of an…

Abstract

A new vehicle for user instruction in academic libraries could be a hypertext library guide distributed on the World Wide Web. This article considers the advantages of an electronic library guide, and the particular advantages and problems of producing one using HTML (hypertext markup language) on the World Wide Web. Existing library guides on the Web are reviewed, and found to be impressive if capable of improvement. Some of the broad design issues are also reviewed, and the possible content of a guide discussed. Likely future developments are then considered.

Details

Program, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article

Elizabeth Yakel and Helen Tibbo

User‐based evaluation in archives and special collections is in its infancy, and this paper aims to discuss the conceptualization, development, and testing of Archival…

Abstract

Purpose

User‐based evaluation in archives and special collections is in its infancy, and this paper aims to discuss the conceptualization, development, and testing of Archival Metrics Toolkits. The development and adoption of standardized metrics to support the management of both analog and digital collections is a critical need in archives and manuscript collections.

Design/methodology/approach

The Archival Metrics Toolkits were created, and comprised five user‐based evaluation instruments for archives and special collections in colleges and universities: researcher, archival web sites, online finding aids, student researchers, and teaching support.

Findings

The Archival Metrics Toolkits, as developed, represent a first step toward standardized evaluation created specifically for archives. Now it is up to the community to adopt these tools and report their use.

Originality/value

These are the first standardized questionnaires to target archives and special collections and take into consideration the unique environment of primary sources and the specific dynamics involved in connecting researchers with archival and manuscript collections.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

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Article

Katherine Choy and Daniel Schlagwein

– The purpose of the paper is to better understand the relation between information technology (IT) affordances and donor motivations in charitable crowdfunding.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to better understand the relation between information technology (IT) affordances and donor motivations in charitable crowdfunding.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports the findings from a comparative case study of two charitable crowdfunding campaigns.

Findings

The affordances of crowdfunding platforms support types of donor motivation that are not supported effectively, or at all, in offline charity.

Research limitations/implications

For future researchers, the paper provides a theoretical model of the relation between IT affordances and motivations in the context of charitable crowdfunding.

Practical/implications

For practitioners in the charity space, the paper suggests why they may wish to consider the use of charitable crowdfunding and how they may go about its implementation.

Originality/value

Based on field research at two charitable crowdfunding campaigns, the paper provides a new theoretical model.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article

Isto Huvila

Information science research has begun to broaden its traditional focus on information seeking to cover other modes of acquiring information. The purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

Information science research has begun to broaden its traditional focus on information seeking to cover other modes of acquiring information. The purpose of this paper is to move forward on this trajectory and to present a framework for explicating how in addition to being sought, existing information are made useful and taken into use.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual enquiry draws on an empirical vignette based on an observation study of an archaeological teaching excavation. The conceptual perspective builds on Andersen’s genre approach and Huvila’s notion of situational appropriation.

Findings

This paper suggests that information becomes appropriable, and appropriated (i.e. taken into use), when informational and social genres intertwine with each other. This happens in a continuous process of (re)appropriation of information where existing information scaffolds new information and the on-going process of appropriation.

Originality/value

The approach is proposed as a potentially powerful conceptualisation for explicating information interactions when existing information is taken into use rather than sought that have received little attention in traditional models and theories of human information behaviour.

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