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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Laura Ramsay, Jamie S. Walton, Gavin Frost, Chloe Rewaj, Gemma Westley, Helen Tucker, Sarah Millington, Aparna Dhar, Gemma Martin and Caitriona Gill

The purpose of this paper is to outline the qualitative research findings of the effectiveness of Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service Programme Needs Assessment…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the qualitative research findings of the effectiveness of Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service Programme Needs Assessment (PNA) in supporting decision making regarding selection onto high-intensity offending behaviour programmes.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data analysis was used through the application of thematic analysis. Results were pooled using principles from meta-synthesis in order to draw conclusions as to whether the PNA was operating as designed.

Findings

Four overarching themes were identified, which have meaning in guiding decision making into, or out of high-intensity programmes. These were risk, need and responsivity, the importance of attitudes, motivation and formulation and planning.

Research limitations/implications

The majority of data were collected from category C prisons. Generalisability of findings to high-intensity programmes delivered in maximum security prisons and prisons for younger people aged 18–21 years is limited. The research team had prior knowledge of the PNA, whether through design or application. Procedures were put in place to minimise researcher biases.

Practical implications

Findings suggest that the PNA is effective in guiding clinical decision making. Practitioners and policy makers can be assured that the processes in place to select into high-intensity programmes are effective, and aligned with the What Works in reducing re-offending.

Originality/value

This is the first evaluation into the effectiveness of the PNA designed to support clinical decision making regarding participant selection onto accredited offending behaviour programmes. Implications for practice have been discussed.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2010

Helen Tucker

As one of the 16 pilots in the Department of Health Integrated Care Organisation (ICO) programme, Norfolk is exploring ways of integrating primary, community and social…

Abstract

As one of the 16 pilots in the Department of Health Integrated Care Organisation (ICO) programme, Norfolk is exploring ways of integrating primary, community and social care services in six localities. Progress in the first few months is assessed within the framework of the six laws of integration developed by Leutz. The initiative has a high degree of support across the County, and local practitioners are taking the opportunity of being within a national programme to redesign their services for the benefit of patients and carers. There is work to do at every level to align the strategy, policy, management and operation of the service to facilitate integrated working for the benefit of patients and carers. The Norfolk approach is to build on existing knowledge of good practice, identify champions by inviting volunteers to work on the pilot, and share experience through a network for the six localities in preparation for rolling out and replicating the model. Progress is being monitored nationally as well as locally.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Helen Tucker

There is a strong tradition of integration in rural community hospitals which has been largely unrecognised in the past. The national strategy for health in England now…

Abstract

There is a strong tradition of integration in rural community hospitals which has been largely unrecognised in the past. The national strategy for health in England now gives community hospitals a central role in providing integrated health and social care, in a policy referred to as ‘care closer to home’. The evidence emerging from international and national studies is demonstrating the benefit of the community hospital model of care. Public support for community hospitals over their 100‐year history has been strong, with value being placed on accessibility, quality and continuity. There is, however, a tension between the national policy and the current financial pressures to close or reduce services in one in three community hospitals in England. Innovative ways of owning and managing these services are being put forward by communities who are actively seeking to maintain and develop their local hospitals. The challenge is to demonstrate that community hospital services are valued models of person‐centred integrated care, and to demonstrate their contribution to the health and well‐being of their communities.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Helen Tucker, Veronica Larkin and Martina Martin

The Midland Health Board in Ireland has invested significantly in promoting integrated care in order to improve the quality and efficiency of its services. Stakeholders in…

Abstract

The Midland Health Board in Ireland has invested significantly in promoting integrated care in order to improve the quality and efficiency of its services. Stakeholders in all agencies have shared in the creation of the ICON model that provides a structured approach to integration. The diagrammatic model has enabled shared understanding of providing, managing and receiving integrated health and care services. A resource pack and measurement tool have been developed to continue to support the increasing number of implementation sites for integration across all client groups. The transferability of the project is being tested in another Board in Ireland, and lessons will be shared as the projects progress.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Helen Tucker, Veronica Larkin and Martina Martin

This article updates an article in Issue 12 (5) of the Journal of Integrated Care, which explained the first two phases of the ICON project in the Midland Area of Ireland…

Abstract

This article updates an article in Issue 12 (5) of the Journal of Integrated Care, which explained the first two phases of the ICON project in the Midland Area of Ireland. It describes the systems and processes put in place to support improving practice, focusing on process, culture and context, and illustrates the impact so far on individual clients and families, and how this information is being shared.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2013

Helen Tucker

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the presence and nature of integrated care in community hospitals.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the presence and nature of integrated care in community hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

Staff reported their views and experiences of integrated care in 48 questionnaires for a Community Hospitals Association programme. An analytical framework was developed based on eight types of integration, and the community hospital services concerned were grouped into nine service categories.

Findings

Staff reported multiple types of integration, averaging four types (median), with a range of two to eight (of the eight types studied). The types of integration most frequently reported were multidisciplinary care, and community hospital/secondary care and community hospital/primary care. Integration with communities, patients and the third sector featured in many of the services. Integration with social care and local authorities were least frequently reported. Services with the highest number of types of integration (5+) included palliative care, maternity services and health promotion. Staff reported that commitment was a positive factor whilst a lack of staff resources hindered partnership working.

Research limitations/implications

Staff volunteered to be part of the programme which promoted good practice, and although the findings from the study cannot be generalised, they do contribute knowledge on key partnerships in local hospitals. Further research on the types, levels and outcomes of integrated care in a larger sample of community hospitals would build on this study and enable further exploration of partnership working.

Practical implications

The analytical framework developed for the study is being applied by staff and community groups as a tool to help assess appropriate partnership working and help identify the scope for further developing integrated care. The evidence of integrated working is available to inform those commissioning and providing community health services.

Originality/value

This study has shown that integrated working is present in community hospitals. This research provides new knowledge on the types of integrated care present in a range of community hospital services. The study shows a tradition of joint working, the presence of multiple simultaneous types of integration and demonstrated that integrated care can be provided in a range of services to patients of all ages in local communities.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Helen Tucker and Mark Burgis

This paper aims to demonstrate the approach taken in Norfolk, UK, to engage patients and staff to develop and improve services by stimulating improvements in integrated…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate the approach taken in Norfolk, UK, to engage patients and staff to develop and improve services by stimulating improvements in integrated working. The two year programme focused on making specific improvements that patients said they wanted to see by working with staff who volunteered to take part in the programme.

Design/methodology/approach

The “Integrating Care in Norfolk” pilot (ICN) was one of 16 national pilots. GPs from 32 practices worked with local community staff to redesign services to meet “patient pledges”. The impact of changes on patients, staff and services were evaluated locally using questionnaires and by analysing data combined in a performance dashboard. The ICN was subject to both national and local evaluations, which provided a basis for comparison.

Findings

The local evaluation showed that progress had been made towards meeting objectives, including patients and staff satisfaction and reducing unplanned admissions. GPs recorded improvements to joint working, and all staff concerned chose to continue the project beyond the pilot period.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of the local evaluation contrasted with those of the national evaluation. The Norfolk study demonstrated the positive impact of integrating care on patients, staff and services. The national study concluded that there were minimal or negative impacts of integrating care, although the study amalgamated all 16 pilots, with very different clients, services and objectives.

Originality/value

The ICN was novel in the way that patients and staff were engaged. Patients were invited to set an agenda for change, and provided a mandate to staff from each organisation to redesign their services. This approach may provide a solution to sustainable integrated working. The ICN was evaluated locally as well as nationally as part of the DH ICP programme, enabling respective findings to be compared and validated.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 November 2013

Helen Dickinson and Robin Miller and Jon Glasby

Abstract

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2011

Helen Tucker, Gita Prasad and Mark Burgis

This paper aims to demonstrate the approach taken in Norfolk to improve the health and welfare of young people. Local practitioners in Thetford want to address teenage…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate the approach taken in Norfolk to improve the health and welfare of young people. Local practitioners in Thetford want to address teenage pregnancy rates as a priority issue for their community; they have volunteered to be part of a national pilot to test integrated working in a service that involves many agencies and services.

Design/methodology/approach

This health promotion service was a particular challenge for integration as it involved building partnerships between children's and adults’ services, health and social care, education and care services, and voluntary and statutory services. The service also covered the counties of Norfolk and Suffolk. A local core group, chaired by a GP, planned four phases of work: design, information gathering, service redesign and evaluation. This paper sets out an analysis of progress and achievements.

Findings

The group recognised the multiple factors affecting young people and their lives and lifestyles in this area of social deprivation and the benefits of partnership working. Improvements to date include better coordination, improved access to services and an enhancement of services.

Research limitations/implications

The impact will not be measurable within the timescale of the pilot project in respect of reducing pregnancy rates; the work is ongoing.

Practical implications

Implications of the study include how partnership working can lead to targeting resources and to improving access to contraception and services.

Originality/value

This study is a local initiative within the national programme for integrating care, demonstrating the benefits of working together to target resources and working in a more coordinated way.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2011

Kelly M. Mack, Claudia M. Rankins and Cynthia E. Winston

The nation's first Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) were founded before the end of the U.S. Civil War. However, most were established in the post-Civil…

Abstract

The nation's first Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) were founded before the end of the U.S. Civil War. However, most were established in the post-Civil War era, through the Freedmen's Bureau and other organizations such as the American Missionary Association (AMA) when the U.S. federal government initiated an organized effort to educate newly freed slaves (Hoffman, 1996). Additional support for HBCUs arose from the second Morrill Act of 1890, which provided opportunities for all races in those states where Black students were excluded from public higher education. Thus, since their founding in the 1800s, the nation's HBCUs have had as their missions to provide access to higher education for the disenfranchised and underprivileged of our society. Today, these institutions continue to make significant contributions in educating African American and other underrepresented minority students, particularly in the areas of science and engineering. Although they comprise only 3% of U.S. institutions of higher education, HBCUs in 2008 awarded 20% of the baccalaureate degrees earned by Blacks in science and engineering (National Science Foundation, 2011).

Details

Beyond Stock Stories and Folktales: African Americans' Paths to STEM Fields
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-168-8

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