Search results

1 – 10 of 17
Article
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Craig S. Fleisher, Sheila Wright and Helen T. Allard

The paper seeks to address the viability of planning and executing the integration of four often independent marketing information management techniques, i.e. competitive…

2968

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to address the viability of planning and executing the integration of four often independent marketing information management techniques, i.e. competitive intelligence (CI), customer relationship management (CRM), data mining (DM) and market research (MR).

Design/methodology/approach

The research presented is a longitudinal, exploratory and descriptive case study, covering a three‐year period during a critical development phase of a medium‐size, national employer association which sought to improve the quality of marketing‐based insights to its strategic planning capability as well as improve economic outcomes.

Findings

It is possible to achieve profitable and capability enhancing integration of diverse marketing information management techniques. Successful integration and the use of a highly focused cross‐functional team generated better market strategies and bottom line benefits.

Practical implications

The need to generate greater insight from popular marketing information management and planning techniques is routinely experienced by marketing and other executive decision makers. This article provides a multi‐year roadmap of the successful execution of technique integration, including identifying barriers that arose as well as suggesting solutions for achieving progress.

Originality/value

There are very few case studies published that demonstrate the successful evolution and integration of CI, CRM, DM and MR into the enterprise's strategy‐making process. The unique element of this example is that it was achieved within the context of a medium‐sized, national, not‐for‐profit employer association.

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

John H. Bickford III and Katherine A. Silva

State and national initiatives provide teachers opportunities for interdisciplinary units with increased significance of non-fiction in English Language Arts and decreased…

Abstract

State and national initiatives provide teachers opportunities for interdisciplinary units with increased significance of non-fiction in English Language Arts and decreased reliance on the textbook in history and social studies. In these three disciplines, beginning in elementary school, students are expected to scrutinize multiple trade books of the same event, era, or person to construct understandings. Trade books are a logical curricular link between these three curricula. The initiatives, however, do not prescribe specific curricular materials; teachers rely on their own discretion when selecting available trade books. Historical misrepresentations have been found to emerge within trade books to varying degrees, yet only a few empirical studies have been conducted. We empirically evaluated trade books centered on the Anne Sullivan Macy, Helen Keller’s teacher. Celebrated as the Miracle Worker, she remains a relatively obscure figure. As a child, Macy faced the desertion or death of every family member and struggled to overcome poverty and isolation. Macy’s story, thus, complements Keller’s in consequential ways. We report various historical misrepresentations within the trade books and provide ancillary primary sources for teachers interested in addressing the historical omissions.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1915

The danger of damage to buildings and their contents that might be caused by German air‐craft and warships has been seriously exercising the thoughts of owners, trustees…

Abstract

The danger of damage to buildings and their contents that might be caused by German air‐craft and warships has been seriously exercising the thoughts of owners, trustees and occupiers, and strong representations have been made to the Board of Trade, urging upon the Government that the State should accept liability in respect of same. This seems only reasonable at a time like the present. The danger is a national one, while any damage done would naturally be local, and we believe the whole nation would be willing to bear the loss for the localities attacked. Mr. Runciman has intimated that the Government is only prepared to consider the matter on the lines of a modified scheme of State Insurance, and while we do not think this satisfactory, it is better than nothing, and some scheme should undoubtedly be arranged by which the local authorities could cover their risks so far as the Municipal Buildings and the Public Libraries are concerned. The Libraries, in many cases, particularly when holding in trust or through bequest or gift the collections of individuals, contain books and articles of great value, and the matter should be in the mind of all librarians, and not be allowed to drop.

Details

New Library World, vol. 17 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2016

John H. Bickford III and Taylor A. Badal

Contemporary education initiatives require English language arts educators spend half their time on non-fiction and history and social studies teachers to include diverse…

Abstract

Contemporary education initiatives require English language arts educators spend half their time on non-fiction and history and social studies teachers to include diverse sources. Beginning in the early grades within the aforementioned curricula, students are to scrutinize multiple texts of the same historical event, era, or figure. Whereas trade books are a logical curricular resource for English language arts and history and social studies curricula, the education mandates do not provide suggestions. Research indicates trade books are rife with historical misrepresentations, yet few empirical studies have been completed so more research is needed. Our research examined the historical representation of Eleanor Roosevelt within trade books for early and middle-grades students. Identified historical misrepresentations included minimized or omitted accounts of the societal contexts and social relationships that shaped Mrs. Roosevelt’s social conscience and civic involvement. Effective content spiraling, in which complexity and nuance increase with grade level, between early and middle-grades trade books did not appear. Pedagogical suggestions included ways to position students to identify the varying degrees of historical representation within different trade books and integrate supplementary primary sources to balance the historical gaps.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

David C. Bell, John S. Atkinson and Victoria Mosier

Describes how HIV and AIDS are carried and spread, particularly for high‐risk groups, but adds that it is not only behavioural but also those behaviours in conjunction…

Abstract

Describes how HIV and AIDS are carried and spread, particularly for high‐risk groups, but adds that it is not only behavioural but also those behaviours in conjunction with others. Employs figures and tables for added explanation and emphasis. Chronicles some individual case studies showing different “risk” behaviours and types of “unsafe” practices. Makes clear that the use of varied types of education are of major importance in the fight against ignorance and nonchalance in the battle against AIDS.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 22 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Chantal Sylvain and Lise Lamothe

There has been considerable effort in recent years to link and integrate professional services more closely for patients with comorbidities. However, difficulties persist…

Abstract

Purpose

There has been considerable effort in recent years to link and integrate professional services more closely for patients with comorbidities. However, difficulties persist, especially at the clinical level. This study aims to shed light on these difficulties by examining the process of sensemaking in professionals directly involved in this integration.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted an eight‐year longitudinal case study of an organization specializing in mental health and substance abuse. Different data collection methods were used, including 34 interviews conducted between 2003 and 2009, observations and document analysis. The authors performed a qualitative analysis of the data using a processual perspective.

Findings

This paper provides empirical insights about the nature of the sensemaking process in which professionals collectively participate and the effects of this process on the evolution of integrated services. It suggests that the development of integrated practices results from an evolutional and collective process of constructing meanings that is rooted in the work activities of the professionals involved.

Practical implications

By drawing attention to the capacity of professionals to shape the projects they are implementing, this study questions the capacity of managers to actually manage such a process. In order to obtain the expected benefits of integration projects, such emergent dynamics must first be recognized and then supported. Only then can thought be given to mastering them.

Research limitations/implications

The fact that this is a single case study is not a limitation per se, although it does raise the issue of the transferability of results. Replicating the study in other contexts would verify the applicability of the authors' conclusions.

Originality/value

This study offers a fresh perspective on the difficulties generally encountered at the clinical level when trying to integrate services. It makes a significant contribution to work on the dynamics of sensemaking in organizational life.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2007

Michael Organ and Helen Mandl

The purpose of this article is to outline the experiences of an Australian university in selecting a proprietary solution for its open access digital repository requirements.

1037

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to outline the experiences of an Australian university in selecting a proprietary solution for its open access digital repository requirements.

Design/methodology/approach

An overview is presented of the environment leading up to the decision to select Digital Commons over an open source software solution. The paper also outlines subsequent experiences during a one‐year period in operating the outsourced solution.

Findings

Outsourcing is an appropriate digital repository option for higher education institutions when costs are considered and compared with open source solutions, and especially when on‐site IT support is limited. Outsourcing allows local staff to concentrate on liaison with faculty in promoting and populating the repository.

Practical implications

A useful resource for those considering the use of proprietary or open source software for their institutional repository.

Originality/value

This papers deals with a little discussed area of the relatively new subject of open access institutional repositories.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1900

A point repeatedly brought forward for the defence, or at all events for the purpose of mitigating the fine, in adulteration cases, is the statement that defendant's goods…

Abstract

A point repeatedly brought forward for the defence, or at all events for the purpose of mitigating the fine, in adulteration cases, is the statement that defendant's goods have been analysed on former occasions and have been found genuine. As illustrating the slight value of analyses of previous samples may be taken the average laudatory analyses on patent or proprietary foods, drinks, or medicine. The manufacturer calculates—and calculates rightly—that the general public will believe that the published analysis of a particular specimen which had been submitted to the analytical expert by the manufacturer himself, guarantees all the samples on the market to be equally pure. History has repeatedly proved that in 99 cases out of 100 the goods found on the market fall below the quality indicated by the published analyses. Not long ago a case bearing on this matter was tried in court, where samples of cocoa supplied by the wholesale firm were distributed; but, when the retailer tried to sell the bulk of the consignment, he had repeated complaints from his customers that the samples were a very much better article than what he was then supplying. He summoned the wholesale dealer and won his case. But what guarantee have the general public of the quality of any manufacturer's goods—unless the Control System as instituted in Great Britain is accepted and applied ? Inasmuch as any manufacturer who joins the firms under the British Analytical Control thereby undertakes to keep all his samples up to the requisite standard; as his goods thenceforth bear the Control stamp; and as any purchaser can at any time submit a sample bought on the open market to the analytical experts of the British Analytical Control, free of any charge, to ascertain if the sample is up to the published and requisite standard, it is plain that a condition of things is created which not only protects the public from being cheated, but also acts most beneficially for these firms which are not afraid to supply a genuine article. The public are much more willing to buy an absolutely guaranteed article, of which each sample must be kept up to the previous high quality, rather than one which was good while it was being introduced, but as soon as it became well known fell off in quality and continued to live on its reputation alone.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 2 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2016

Joshua L. Kenna and Stewart Waters

We expand on the use of monuments and memorials in the social studies classroom, while further promoting a more inclusive curriculum that better represents women in the…

Abstract

We expand on the use of monuments and memorials in the social studies classroom, while further promoting a more inclusive curriculum that better represents women in the social studies. The way and frequency in which history textbooks and social studies classrooms represent women has improved over the decades; though, it still needs refining. The imbalance goes beyond the social studies classroom and includes the very resources we are advocating social studies teachers use, the United States’ historical monuments and memorials. We, therefore, offer social studies teachers a rationale, resources, and suggested activities for incorporating monuments and memorials commemorating the role of females in U.S. history. Considering less than eight percent of the United States’ cataloged, public outdoor statues honoring individuals are of women.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2014

Kathryn E. Engebretson

As the Era of Accountability has given rise to the prevalence of curriculum standards and multiple educational stakeholders have engaged in the writing of these documents…

Abstract

As the Era of Accountability has given rise to the prevalence of curriculum standards and multiple educational stakeholders have engaged in the writing of these documents, the National Council for the Social Studies has revised its original standards document published nearly two decades ago. This study investigated what the revised document reveals in terms of gendered discourses. Through employing the tools of discourse analysis, the dominant discourses advanced in the document’s curricular recommendations were revealed. Two discourses prevailed in the analysis: gender imbalance with a narrow view of valued masculinity and gender-free with a hidden discourse of males dominating in those spaces. A discussion of the presence of trans and other gender identities in the document is included. As gender is sparsely mentioned in the curricular recommendations, and a binary view of gender is adhered to throughout, there is little guidance for curriculum writers and teachers to teach in transformative ways that challenge the status quo.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

1 – 10 of 17