Search results

1 – 10 of 91
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 December 2009

Sam Bennett, Helen Sanderson and Gill Bailey

The active and passive flow of information that this issue of WwOP has so far explored is all about the betterment of older people's lives. But how far can we drill down…

Abstract

The active and passive flow of information that this issue of WwOP has so far explored is all about the betterment of older people's lives. But how far can we drill down into the minutiae of an individual's life in order to make it better without being intrusive? Through the story of Dennis, Sam Bennett, Helen Sanderson and Gill Bailey now describe a method that is being refined to do just that.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Helen Sanderson

Person‐centred planning is central to Valuing People. This has resulted in lots of planning activity, but implementing plans in services is deeply challenging. Developing…

Abstract

Person‐centred planning is central to Valuing People. This has resulted in lots of planning activity, but implementing plans in services is deeply challenging. Developing person‐centred teams is a key to implementing plans. This article presents a model for developing person‐centred teams based on research. Examples of how teams worked to implement plans are shown to illustrate this process and clarify why it requires a change in thinking as well as a change in practice.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 October 2009

Max Neill, Julie Allen, Neil Woodhead, Helen Sanderson, Stephen Reid and Lori Erwin

This article discusses the question of risk in the lives of people who are supported by human services. It responds to the way in which risk, as it has traditionally been…

Abstract

This article discusses the question of risk in the lives of people who are supported by human services. It responds to the way in which risk, as it has traditionally been approached by these services, imposes a barrier to social inclusion and to an interesting and productive life. The article proposes an alternative person‐centred risk process. We argue that, by beginning with a focus on who the person is, their gifts and skills, and offering a positive vision of success, it could be possible to avoid the implied aversion to any form of risk embedded in the traditional approaches and attitudes.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Helen Sanderson, Jeanette Thompson and Jackie Kilbane

Recent research (Robertson et al, 2005) has demonstrated that person‐centred planning (PCP) leads to positive changes for people. This research shows how PCP is associated…

Abstract

Recent research (Robertson et al, 2005) has demonstrated that person‐centred planning (PCP) leads to positive changes for people. This research shows how PCP is associated with benefits in the areas of community involvement, contact with friends, contact with family and choice. This paper briefly describes this research and its recommendations. In addition it explores the implications for managers and professionals supporting people with learning disabilities.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

Helen Sanderson, Edwin Jones and Kathy Brown

Valuing People (DoH, 2001) proposes person‐centred planning (PCP) as a way for service users to exercise more power and control. Active support (AS) is also an approach…

Abstract

Valuing People (DoH, 2001) proposes person‐centred planning (PCP) as a way for service users to exercise more power and control. Active support (AS) is also an approach designed to improve the quality of life of people with severe disabilities by enabling them to participate as fully as possible in daily activities. PCP and some of the components of AS are complementary rather than mutually exclusive. While PCP can generate ideas, AS can help implement them, and used together PCP and AS can provide a way to facilitate user participation and improve users' quality of life. This paper uses a case history to illustrate this potential, and describes how a particular form of PCP, essential lifestyle planning (ELP), was used in conjunction with some of the planning and programming components of AS.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Helen Sanderson, Simon Duffy, Carl Poll and Chris Hatton

In Control is a system of self‐directed support. This paper tells the story of its first two years and of the pilot implementation projects run in six local authorities…

Abstract

In Control is a system of self‐directed support. This paper tells the story of its first two years and of the pilot implementation projects run in six local authorities. The key findings from the evaluation are that people are more self‐determined, people have a better sense of direction in their lives, people's support has improved, people's money situation has improved, people are improving their home situation and people's community lives are improving.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 January 2011

Angela Olsen and Sarah Heaton

Services for offenders who have learning disabilities are generally provided in secure and medium secure units. These services are often provided in segregated and…

Abstract

Services for offenders who have learning disabilities are generally provided in secure and medium secure units. These services are often provided in segregated and congregated settings using therapeutic interventions. This paper presents a case study of a housing‐based service provided within the community, based on developing valued social roles for vulnerable people.In 2003 the then Labour government in the UK sought to align all of the state benefits paid to people who were not in work due to disability and other disadvantages. The resulting ‘transitional housing benefit’ integrated housing benefit and other support grants, with the aim of providing vulnerable people and service providers with a single point of reference when it came to the funding of accommodation and support. The service is based on the principle of normalisation (Wolfensberger, 1972; Tyne & O'Brien, 1981), the theory of social role valorisation (SRV) (Wolfensberger & Thomas, 1983; Wolfensberger et al, 1996; Race, 1999) and O'Brien's Framework for Accomplishment (O'Brien, 1987) and provides a credible alternative to more traditional approaches.The paper provides a critical introduction to SRV and O'Brien's Framework and how their principles have been used to support people with complex needs. It discusses some of the structures and attitudes prevalent in society or, as Wolfensberger calls them, the ‘domains’ and ‘major channels’ by which people with learning disabilities are oppressed.The case study includes examples of practice and shows some interesting differences in patterns of referral and destination routes for males and females and concludes with some implications for practice.

Details

Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0927

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Rob Greig

Abstract

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 May 2009

Ian Hall, Edward Burns, Sue Martin, Edd Carter, Samantha Macreath, Magda Pearson and Angela Hassiotis

The care programme approach (CPA) is an important part of supporting people with mental health problems in the community and has been applied with variable success in…

Abstract

The care programme approach (CPA) is an important part of supporting people with mental health problems in the community and has been applied with variable success in services for people with learning disabilities. Investigation into service users' understanding of the CPA has been limited. We employed multiple methodologies to explore what service users with learning disabilities and additional mental health problems thought about the CPA process, and what their understanding of it was. We used the findings to work with other professionals to adapt the meetings in a way that was accessible and inclusive. We included this work in the service communication plan and produced guidance for care co‐ordinators and materials to be used at the meetings. The guidance and materials can be used by any service and will be available online.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

Keywords

1 – 10 of 91