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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

Helen T. Bailie

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560

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Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2013

Helen T. Bailie

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67

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Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 23 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Helen Penn

Sets the context for this special issue focusing on nurseryeducation. Discusses the way in which nursery education relates to othertypes of early childhood services.

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3192

Abstract

Sets the context for this special issue focusing on nursery education. Discusses the way in which nursery education relates to other types of early childhood services.

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Helen Penn

The articles in this issue have highlighted some of the confusionssurrounding early years services. The consensus seems to be thatproviding more nursery education is not a…

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675

Abstract

The articles in this issue have highlighted some of the confusions surrounding early years services. The consensus seems to be that providing more nursery education is not a sufficient solution, even if it could be afforded. What other options are possible? Looks very briefly at two different systems of early childhood services, in Denmark and Spain, and considers some of their implications for the UK.

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

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84

Abstract

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Journal of Children's Services, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Library Hi Tech News, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Case study
Publication date: 1 May 2011

Charles M. Carson, Donald C. Mosley, John S. Bishop and Douglas L. Smith

This case involves the issues within an organization of growth, expansion, change, and a possible shift of focus from hobby to profit. The case also deals with important…

Abstract

This case involves the issues within an organization of growth, expansion, change, and a possible shift of focus from hobby to profit. The case also deals with important factors, which could potentially impact any company's operation. The owners are seeking to address two key issues. The first is a valuation issue prompted by one of the shareholders wishing to sell her interest in the railcar LLC. The second issue is one of expansion. A potential investment ($60,000-$135,000) would permit the company to lease the railcar to other operators who could run the railcar on Amtrak certified tracks nationwide but would remove the shareholders from the day to day operations of the train. The critical decision is whether the owners should invest more money in the business or maintain their current business model and operational structure.

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The CASE Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

S. Hakan Can, William Holt and Helen M. Hendy

When patrol officers experience poor job satisfaction and make the decision to leave their profession, their departments face the cost of recruiting and training new…

Abstract

Purpose

When patrol officers experience poor job satisfaction and make the decision to leave their profession, their departments face the cost of recruiting and training new officers. The purpose of this paper is to develop a new measure that could be used by police departments to identify specific dimensions of job satisfaction in their officers so that appropriate interventions could be made before officers reach the point of ending their employment.

Design/methodology/approach

To enhance widespread applicability of the new measure, the 221 study participants were from convenience samples of patrol officers in the USA and Turkey (95.9 percent male; mean age=29.4 years; mean service=5.9 years). Officers completed anonymous surveys to report individual and departmental demographics, to give satisfaction ratings for a variety of aspects of their work environment, and to report other psychosocial variables that might be used to assess validity of job satisfaction dimensions.

Findings

Exploratory factor analysis produced the 14-item Patrol Officer Job Satisfaction Scale (POJSS) with three dimensions: supervisor fairness, peer comradery, occupational pride. The three POJSS dimensions showed acceptable goodness-of-fit, internal reliability, and test-retest reliability. Multiple regression analyses demonstrated no significant associations between nine individual and department demographics (gender, age, marital status, education, service years, weekly work hours, nation, city location, number of officers) and any of the three POJSS dimensions.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of the present study was that it included only convenience samples of patrol officers from the USA and Turkey. Future research could conduct confirmatory factor analyses on more diverse and representative samples of patrol officers from various international locations to determine if they also perceive the same three POJSS dimensions of job satisfaction (supervisor fairness, peer comradery, occupational pride).

Practical implications

Police departments could use the POJSS as an assessment tool to identify any problems of poor job satisfaction in their patrol officers so they could provide targeted improvements. For example, if patrol officers report low ratings for supportive peers, some scholars have recommended the formation of officer support groups (Johnson, 2012; Pienaar et al., 2007; Rhoades and Eisenberger, 2002; Scott, 2004; Stamper and Johlke, 2003; Toch, 2002; Walker et al., 2006).

Social implications

If patrol officers report low ratings for supervisor fairness, peer comradery, and occupational pride, police departments could arrange leadership seminars, hold “Clear the Air” meetings or anonymous surveys to allow patrol officers to identify specific improvements they suggest to improve these components of job satisfaction.

Originality/value

Research on police officer job satisfaction has been increasing in recent decades, but is still relatively sparse when compared to the study of employee job satisfaction in the private sector and other areas of government. Recent research on police job satisfaction has typically included law enforcement officers with a wide range of ranks, rather than focusing solely on patrol officers. Also, the few studies that focus on job satisfaction in patrol officers used either secondary data (Ingram and Lee, 2015) or re-evaluated data over eight-year old (Johnson, 2012). Especially with the recent turbulent events seen between community members and their front-line police officers (including in the USA and Turkey), available research may have missed the most important dimensions of job satisfaction for present patrol officers supporting the measure's widespread relevance.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Book part
Publication date: 27 October 2016

Alexandra L. Ferrentino, Meghan L. Maliga, Richard A. Bernardi and Susan M. Bosco

This research provides accounting-ethics authors and administrators with a benchmark for accounting-ethics research. While Bernardi and Bean (2010) considered publications…

Abstract

This research provides accounting-ethics authors and administrators with a benchmark for accounting-ethics research. While Bernardi and Bean (2010) considered publications in business-ethics and accounting’s top-40 journals this study considers research in eight accounting-ethics and public-interest journals, as well as, 34 business-ethics journals. We analyzed the contents of our 42 journals for the 25-year period between 1991 through 2015. This research documents the continued growth (Bernardi & Bean, 2007) of accounting-ethics research in both accounting-ethics and business-ethics journals. We provide data on the top-10 ethics authors in each doctoral year group, the top-50 ethics authors over the most recent 10, 20, and 25 years, and a distribution among ethics scholars for these periods. For the 25-year timeframe, our data indicate that only 665 (274) of the 5,125 accounting PhDs/DBAs (13.0% and 5.4% respectively) in Canada and the United States had authored or co-authored one (more than one) ethics article.

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-973-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Ibrahim Ahmed Al-Kindi and Helen T. Bailie

The aim of this study is to examine how national cultural values influence and impact management practices and styles in the Sultanate of Oman. Administrative and…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to examine how national cultural values influence and impact management practices and styles in the Sultanate of Oman. Administrative and managerial performance, especially in developing countries, is thought to be shaped to a large degree by traditional social values, which prevent managers from effectively implementing sound management processes.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses empirical research to explore and determine the link between Oman’s cultural values and managers’ managerial practices and styles. The aim is to examine the correlations between the influence of cultural values on managerial practices and styles using Schwartz’s (1992) Value Survey, the Portrait Value Questionnaire and Managerial Style and Practice.

Findings

It was found that in Oman, cultural values affect the efficiency of managerial performance and lead to a limited interest in management theory and sound managerial practices.

Research limitations/implications

This study was limited to managerial practices in Oman. Further study could include other developing countries in the Arabian Gulf States.

Originality/value

While management performance in developing countries has received wide attention during the past three decades, few studies have researched the area of management and managerial practices and styles in Omani organizations.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

Keywords

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