Search results

1 – 10 of 37
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 August 2019

Nihel Chabrak, Jim Haslam and Helen Oakes

The purpose of this paper is to reflect a critical perspective drawing from phenomenology, especially informed by a reading of Heidegger, to enhance and extend…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect a critical perspective drawing from phenomenology, especially informed by a reading of Heidegger, to enhance and extend appreciation of the need to question accounting’s meaning or delineation and how research might be undertaken into the accounting phenomenon and related areas.

Design/methodology/approach

To illustrate and clarify argumentation in terms of accounting mobilization and the domain of accounting research, the mainstream and strongly positivistic accounting perspective adopted in the USA is critically assessed. At the same time, the authors elaborate how much of interpretive research (including much of that labeled critical) is also lacking in terms of the perspective articulated here.

Findings

The paper stresses the case for questioning the taken-for-granted and conventional. It promotes reflexivity, cautious pragmatism, attentiveness to the value of the existing, responsibility to difference and otherness and openness to new possibilities as part of a deeper critical orientation.

Originality/value

The paper draws from phenomenology, especially in Heideggerian terms to open-up new conversational domain to debate accounting.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 May 2013

Steve Oakes, Anthony Patterson and Helen Oakes

Despite the relatively low cultural status of department store music, it is proposed that music – the shopping soundtrack – is capable of transforming perceptions of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the relatively low cultural status of department store music, it is proposed that music – the shopping soundtrack – is capable of transforming perceptions of the environment in which it is heard, and eliciting immediate emotional and behavioural responses, thus underlining the influence of music, regardless of whether it is passively heard as a background element or actively listened to as a live performance in a dedicated venue.

Design/methodology/approach

This study addresses a gap in the marketing literature for introspective research evaluating the experience of music in service environments. It draws upon auto‐ethnographic data through which participants ponder their own consumption experience and provide detailed, subjective accounts of events and memories.

Findings

When considering the effects of music upon emotional, cognitive and behavioural responses, it highlights the importance of musicscape response moderators.

Practical implications

The service environment appears more exciting and attractive and may encourage increased spending when background music is congruous with other servicescape elements. Music with positive autobiographical resonance elicits pleasurably nostalgic emotions, positive evaluations and longer stay. However, the aural incongruity of unexpected silence in music‐free zones produces feelings of discomfort leading to negative store evaluation and departure.

Originality/value

Qualitative data are deliberately represented using typically positivist discourse to encourage resolution of the inherent tension between interpretivist and positivist perspectives and stimulate increased methodological integration (e.g. through future studies of music combining quantitative and qualitative data).

Details

Arts Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-2084

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 April 2009

Helen Oakes

The orthopaedic consultants at East Kent Hospitals NHS Trust had questioned whether the Extended Scope Practitioners (ESPs) and consultants were forming a comparable…

Abstract

Purpose

The orthopaedic consultants at East Kent Hospitals NHS Trust had questioned whether the Extended Scope Practitioners (ESPs) and consultants were forming a comparable diagnosis and treatment plan. This audit aims to identify what percentage of patients received a comparable diagnosis from the ESPs and the orthopaedic consultant and to find out what percentage of patients referred from the ESP to the orthopaedic consultant for a surgical opinion underwent surgery.

Design/methodology/approach

The medical notes of a sample of patients from the ESP clinic who had been referred to the orthopaedic consultant were reviewed retrospectively and the following information was documented in a table: the ESP's diagnosis, the consultant's diagnosis and whether the patient underwent surgery.

Findings

The audit found a 31 per cent partially and 65 per cent fully comparable diagnosis rate between the consultant and the ESPs, and the ESPs predicted which patient would undergo surgery in 86 per cent of cases. The results of this audit compared favourably with the benchmarks set.

Practical implications

Audits such as this will hopefully help improve consultant, ESP, manager and patient confidence that the ESP is a valuable and effective member of the orthopaedic team.

Originality/value

A search for papers relating to ESP services on the healthcare databases AMED, BNI, CINAHL and MEDLINE found a number of articles which have reported on audits of ESP services but to date not with regard to shoulder problems. The paper may encourage other clinicians to do similar audits, supporting the expansion of ESP services within the NHS and ultimately improving patient care.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1980

Beth Stafford

The publication rate and volume of bibliographies on women's studies in the past ten years have grown dramatically. As an interdisciplinary field of scholarship, women's…

Abstract

The publication rate and volume of bibliographies on women's studies in the past ten years have grown dramatically. As an interdisciplinary field of scholarship, women's studies covers a vast array of subjects. For this reason, most of the bibliographies being published are fairly specialized. That is, they cover specific aspects of women's studies such as history or education. The very excellent Esther Stineman work, Women's Studies: A Recommended Core Bibliography (discussed more fully below), which has a cutoff date of 1978, includes 90 bibliographies itself. This author has easily identified nearly 30 women's studies bibliographies published separately since 1978 and many more soon to be published.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1977

The case, briefly reported in the last issue of BFJ, an appeal to a Milk and Dairies Tribunal arising out of a local authority's refusal to grant a licence to a milk…

Abstract

The case, briefly reported in the last issue of BFJ, an appeal to a Milk and Dairies Tribunal arising out of a local authority's refusal to grant a licence to a milk distributor because he failed to comply with a requirement that he should provide protective curtains to his milk floats, was a rare and in many ways, an interesting event. The Tribunal in this case was set up under reg. 16(2) (f), Milk (Special Designation) Regulations, 1963, constituted in accordance with Part I, clause 2 (2), Schedule 4 of the Regulations. Part II outlines procedure for such tribunals. The Tribunal is similar to that authorized by S.30, Food and Drugs Act, 1955, which deals with the registration of dairymen, dairy farms and farmers, and the Milk and Dairies (General) Regulations, 1959. Part II, Schedule 2 of the Act provided for reference to a tribunal of appeals against refusal or cancellation of registration by the Ministry, but of producers only. A local authority's power to refuse to register or cancellation contained in Part I, Schedule 2 provided for no such reference and related to instances where “public health is or is likely to be endangered by any act or default” of such a person, who was given the right of appeal against refusal to register, etc., to a magistrates' court. No such limitation exists in respect of the revoking, suspending, refusal to renew a licence under the Milk (Special Designation) Regulations, 1963; an appeal against same lies to the Minister, who must refer the matter to a tribunal, if the person so requests. This occurred in the case under discussion.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 79 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 27 October 2016

Alexandra L. Ferrentino, Meghan L. Maliga, Richard A. Bernardi and Susan M. Bosco

This research provides accounting-ethics authors and administrators with a benchmark for accounting-ethics research. While Bernardi and Bean (2010) considered publications…

Abstract

This research provides accounting-ethics authors and administrators with a benchmark for accounting-ethics research. While Bernardi and Bean (2010) considered publications in business-ethics and accounting’s top-40 journals this study considers research in eight accounting-ethics and public-interest journals, as well as, 34 business-ethics journals. We analyzed the contents of our 42 journals for the 25-year period between 1991 through 2015. This research documents the continued growth (Bernardi & Bean, 2007) of accounting-ethics research in both accounting-ethics and business-ethics journals. We provide data on the top-10 ethics authors in each doctoral year group, the top-50 ethics authors over the most recent 10, 20, and 25 years, and a distribution among ethics scholars for these periods. For the 25-year timeframe, our data indicate that only 665 (274) of the 5,125 accounting PhDs/DBAs (13.0% and 5.4% respectively) in Canada and the United States had authored or co-authored one (more than one) ethics article.

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-973-2

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Helen M.G. Watt, Jacquelynne S. Eccles and Amanda M. Durik

Why do girls and women progressively opt out of maths‐related study and careers? This study aims to examine motivations influencing female adolescents' choices for maths…

Abstract

Purpose

Why do girls and women progressively opt out of maths‐related study and careers? This study aims to examine motivations influencing female adolescents' choices for maths participation during high school, which has implications for their long‐term careers.

Design/methodology/approach

Two longitudinal samples were included from different contexts – one from Sydney, Australia (N=459), and the other from Southeastern Michigan, USA (N=266). Both samples involved adolescents from upper middle‐class backgrounds, from coeducational government schools, and data in both settings were collected in the mid 1990s. Australian data spanned a three‐year period through grades 9 to 11; while the US sample spanned a five‐year period, with data from grades 8, 10, 11, and 12. The Expectancy‐Value model of Eccles (Parsons) et al., framed structural equation modelling analyses for the influences of maths ability‐related beliefs and values on boys' and girls' subsequent choices for senior high maths participation.

Findings

Boys selected higher levels of maths than girls in the Australian setting, although not in the US sample. There was no support for gendered maths achievement as a basis for gendered maths participation. Interest in and liking for maths were the strongest influence on the Australian adolescents' choices for maths participation, with ability beliefs also influencing choices over and above prior mathematical achievement. Ability‐related beliefs and different kinds of values also predicted adolescents' choices in the US sample, more strongly for girls than boys.

Practical implications

Interpretations and implications focus on ways to increase girls' and women's retention in the leaky maths pipeline.

Originality/value

Longitudinal data allow one to determine the extent to which different kinds of motivations predict boys' and girls' mathematical course‐taking through senior high school across Australian and US samples. This has implications for their long‐term careers.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2020

Abstract

Details

What’s Hot in Literacy: Exemplar Models of Effective Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-874-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Helen Sanderson, Jeanette Thompson and Jackie Kilbane

Recent research (Robertson et al, 2005) has demonstrated that person‐centred planning (PCP) leads to positive changes for people. This research shows how PCP is associated…

Abstract

Recent research (Robertson et al, 2005) has demonstrated that person‐centred planning (PCP) leads to positive changes for people. This research shows how PCP is associated with benefits in the areas of community involvement, contact with friends, contact with family and choice. This paper briefly describes this research and its recommendations. In addition it explores the implications for managers and professionals supporting people with learning disabilities.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

1 – 10 of 37