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Article

Walter Lloyd-Smith, Lindsey Bampton, Julia Caldwell, Anita Eader, Helen Jones and Steven Turner

This paper aims to set out to share the reflections of safeguarding adult board managers as they worked through what is likely to be just the first wave of the coronavirus…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to set out to share the reflections of safeguarding adult board managers as they worked through what is likely to be just the first wave of the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on the experience of small number of safeguarding adult board managers who have provided reflections from practice.

Findings

This paper illustrates just some of the responses developed by safeguarding adult board managers and their boards to continue to deliver the work of safeguarding those at risk of abuse and harm in the face of unprecedented impact of the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic on a key aspect of the safeguarding adult system in England.

Originality/value

The reflections reported here are not intended to offer a representative commentary on the experiences of those who oversee and manage safeguarding adults’ boards. It is intention to provide a flavour of some of the challenges and dilemmas faced and some of the creative solutions to address them used by one group of adult safeguarding practitioners.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article

Martin Innes, Fiona Brookman and Helen Jones

This article explores how homicide detectives make sense of and manipulate multiple physical, digital and informational artefacts when assembling case narratives. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This article explores how homicide detectives make sense of and manipulate multiple physical, digital and informational artefacts when assembling case narratives. The authors introduce the concept of mosaicking to illuminate how different modes of information, deriving from different investigative methods, are used in concert at key moments of the investigative process – defining what type of crime has occurred; the incrimination and elimination of suspects; and decisions to charge key suspects.

Design/methodology/approach

The data qualitatively analysed include several hundred case papers, interview transcripts (n = 144) and detailed ethnographic fieldnotes relating to 44 homicide investigations across four police services. These were collected during a four-year ethnographic study of the use of forensic sciences and technologies (FSTs) in British homicide investigations.

Findings

Mosaicking describes how investigators blend and combine information, intelligence and evidence generated via different techniques and methods, to make sense of “who did what to whom and why?” Through processes of convergent and divergent mosaicking, detectives are able to “lean” on different kinds of material to reinforce or connect key points of evidence or intelligence.

Originality/value

The findings fill a gap in knowledge about how investigators blend and composite diverse sources of information in the construction of case narratives. The findings present a more complex and nuanced understanding of the epistemological and interpretative work conducted by contemporary detectives, given the array of investigative technologies they increasingly have at their disposal.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article

Peter Smee, Sue North and Helen Jones

The “information triangle” identifies the key personnel within information management. By respecting the skills and abilities of the different roles, and building…

Abstract

The “information triangle” identifies the key personnel within information management. By respecting the skills and abilities of the different roles, and building relationships through understanding, there are greater chances for maximising the effective management and use of information within the organisation.

Details

New Library World, vol. 102 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

Helen Jones, Mary Connor and John Bennett

Outlines the philosophy, concepts and structure of a course incounselling for consultants. The participants on the first course wereintroduced to counselling whilst on a…

Abstract

Outlines the philosophy, concepts and structure of a course in counselling for consultants. The participants on the first course were introduced to counselling whilst on a management course and had asked for further training. They found the skills useful in enabling their own personal development; in working with their patients; in supporting their colleagues and in career advice to junior staff. Evaluation indicates the high value placed by participants on this course.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article

Trevor Jones and Helen Macilwaine

Total Quality Management is becoming widely known in health care organisations, and one health authority′s methods of setting up such a scheme is explored. All departments…

Abstract

Total Quality Management is becoming widely known in health care organisations, and one health authority′s methods of setting up such a scheme is explored. All departments and units were canvassed by letter to contribute ideas and suggestions, and subsequently programmes and agendas were established to implement these.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 4 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article

Helen Jones, Carole S. Gazey and Sophia M. Martin

Describes the need to improve communication between doctors andmanagers in the NHS, to enable them to work together. Describes anapproach to management development based…

Abstract

Describes the need to improve communication between doctors and managers in the NHS, to enable them to work together. Describes an approach to management development based on research findings. Those involved include a group of associates who contribute to management development programmes and initiatives for doctors and managers within Yorkshire.

Details

Health Manpower Management, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-2065

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Article

Stephanie Davis‐Kahl

The purpose of this article is to prove that chick lit is a legitimate and important area of collection for academic libraries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to prove that chick lit is a legitimate and important area of collection for academic libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

This article presents a definition of chick lit with an overview of the origin and significance of the term itself, discusses chick lit's impact on publishing, and its relationship to academia and women's writing.

Findings

Chick lit is an important area for libraries to collect in because it is representative of women's writing in the twentieth‐twenty‐first century, and because it is a cultural and economic force in the publishing and entertainment worlds.

Practical implications

This article presents guidelines on building a chick lit collection.

Originality/value

This article provides a perspective on chick lit lacking in the literature aimed at academic libraries. A search of Library and Information Science Abstracts (LISA), Library Literature and Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts (LISTA) reflects the dearth of articles on this specific topic.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Book part

Helen May and Mark Jones

In recent years, there have been a growing number of references to social capital, in debates about higher education (HE), by policy makers, senior institutional leaders…

Abstract

In recent years, there have been a growing number of references to social capital, in debates about higher education (HE), by policy makers, senior institutional leaders and academics. This chapter highlights the value of social capital to both students and institutions alike, as a contributing factor to the transformational effect of HE; and as an important tool to explain the value of HE to policy makers and the public. We draw on empirical data from students articulating the value of social capital. Their voices demonstrate that social capital has a significant role to play in institutional endeavours to maximise student success.

Details

Access to Success and Social Mobility through Higher Education: A Curate's Egg?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-836-1

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Article

Helen Thornton‐Jones, Susan Hampshaw, Hora Soltan and Rajan Madhok

Reviews antenatal and early childhood screening programmes to assess the impact of guidance from the National Screening Committee (NSC). Develops methods to investigate…

Abstract

Reviews antenatal and early childhood screening programmes to assess the impact of guidance from the National Screening Committee (NSC). Develops methods to investigate local practice (questionnaires and telephone interviews) and summarises best practice guidance from authoritative sources. Reviews 23 antenatal and 15 early childhood programmes, of which 22 and eight respectively are in place locally. Different types of authoritative sources varied in the aspect of screening on which they commented. Guidance from authoritative sources differed and local practice variations reflected this. In three programmes these variations needed to be addressed. Elsewhere, the NSC’s “watch and wait” stance was confirmed. Limitations to local quality assurance were also identified. Programmes are for the most part following authoritative guidance, but variations in authoritative guidance are a significant issue. Robust audit is required to ensure that the local programmes are achieving optimal health gain.

Details

British Journal of Clinical Governance, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-4100

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Article

Geoffrey Sherington and Julia Horne

From the mid‐nineteenth to the early twentieth century universities and colleges were founded throughout Australia and New Zealand in the context of the expanding British…

Abstract

From the mid‐nineteenth to the early twentieth century universities and colleges were founded throughout Australia and New Zealand in the context of the expanding British Empire. This article provides an analytical framework to understand the engagement between changing ideas of higher education at the centre of Empire and within the settler societies in the Antipodes. Imperial influences remained significant, but so was locality in association with the role of the emerging state, while the idea of the public purpose of higher education helped to widen social access forming and sustaining the basis of middle class professions.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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