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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Helen Hockx‐Yu

To discuss the issues and challenges of digital preservation facing institutional repositories and to illustrate the Joint Information Systems Committee's (JISC) view on…

Abstract

Purpose

To discuss the issues and challenges of digital preservation facing institutional repositories and to illustrate the Joint Information Systems Committee's (JISC) view on institutional repositories and its key initiatives in helping UK institutions address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of published work and JISC documents (public facing or internal) were used as reference material.

Findings

Digital preservation is a complex process and there are still many unsolved issues which make it a challenging task for institutional repositories. However, the wide deployment of institutional repositories also provides new opportunities for digital preservation. Much could be done to consider digital preservation from the outset, to involve the authors and to embed digital preservation into repository workflow, which will ease the later preservation tasks.

Research limitations/implications

A number of ongoing JISC‐funded projects are briefly reported which explore different models for the provision of digital preservation services for institutional repositories. These models may be a way forward to tackle collectively the issue of long‐term preservation within the setting of institutional repositories. Depending on the outcomes of the projects, further investigation and implementation could be undertaken to test the models.

Practical implications

This paper will help the reader to gain a better understanding of the issues related to digital preservation in general and how JISC's work has helped to tackle these issues.

Originality/value

This paper clearly states JISC's view on, and future plan for, digital repositories. This is of value to the UK educational community as JISC works on its behalf and responds to its needs.

Details

Program, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2008

Golnessa Galyani Moghaddam

This paper seeks to review the archiving initiatives of scientific journals created and supported by various organizations or institutions.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to review the archiving initiatives of scientific journals created and supported by various organizations or institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of nine archiving initiatives including JSTOR, Portico, E‐Print Repositories, Open Access Model, LOCKSS, OCLC Digital Archive, JISC PubMed Central and KB e‐Depot was carried out. The paper focuses mainly on the initiatives by employing an analytical approach.

Research limitations/implications

There is a wide range of archiving initiatives around the world, making it difficult for the author to carry out a comprehensive review. Nevertheless, limiting its focus to the nine existing initiatives, this paper provides a useful overview.

Originality/value

The paper provides a useful starting‐point to anyone who wants to know about the archiving for posterity of scientific electronic journals and enables people to quickly achieve an overview of the existing archiving initiatives to date.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2021

Paul Gooding, Melissa Terras and Linda Berube

To date, there has been little research into users of the Legal Deposit Libraries (Non-Print Works) Regulations 2013. This paper addresses that gap by presenting key…

Abstract

Purpose

To date, there has been little research into users of the Legal Deposit Libraries (Non-Print Works) Regulations 2013. This paper addresses that gap by presenting key findings from the AHRC-funded Digital Library Futures project. Its purpose is to present a “user-centric” perspective on the potential future impact of the digital collections that are being created under electronic legal deposit regulations.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilises a mixed methods case study of two academic legal deposit libraries in the United Kingdom: The Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford; and Cambridge University Library. It combines surveys of users, web log analysis and expert interviews with librarians and cognate professionals.

Findings

User perspectives on NPLD were not fully considered in the planning and implementation of the 2013 regulations. The authors present findings from their user survey to show how contemporary tensions between user behaviour and access protocols risk limiting the instrumental value of NPLD collections, which have high perceived legacy value.

Originality/value

This is the first study to address the user context for UK Non-Print Legal Deposit. Its value lies in presenting a research-led user assessment of NPLD and in proposing “user-centric” analysis as an addition to the existing “four pillars” of legal deposit research.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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