Search results

1 – 10 of 33
Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Helen Findlay

The Sir William Beveridge Foundation is a young, UK based, international charitable organisation that was formed in 2006 and has its main office in London. Its main aims are to…

Abstract

The Sir William Beveridge Foundation is a young, UK based, international charitable organisation that was formed in 2006 and has its main office in London. Its main aims are to fight poverty; promote care and dignity for the elderly and to promote gender equality. It has developed out of a culturally appropriate homecare service that has been operating in the inner boroughs of London for nine years. The Foundation's emphasis is on practical works in order to pursue its aims and has begun its international effort in Bangladesh where it has been operating for 15 months. This article describes the Foundation's current and proposed projects in Bangladesh and implications in particular that its work can provide for enhancing knowledge and practice in health and social care in the UK and wider world.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2024

Gail Hebson and Clare Mumford

This chapter draws on longitudinal case study research that focused on the experiences of hospitality employees working in a UK university who worked split shifts in the morning…

Abstract

This chapter draws on longitudinal case study research that focused on the experiences of hospitality employees working in a UK university who worked split shifts in the morning and evening while completing NVQ 2 and 3 apprenticeship training. We show how fragmented working time (Rubery, Grimshaw, Hebson, & Ugarte, 2015) rather than long hours led to the apprenticeship training further eroding an already blurred work-life boundary as workers were required to complete training activities in their non-work time which for them is during the middle of the day. We argue current depictions of the positive impact of training and development on low paid workers are decontextualized from the challenges and priorities of workers whose work-life interface is already complex because of working fragmented hours across the day. This is complicated even further by the dynamic and evolving experiences of workers themselves as they experience the highs and lows of combining paid work and training. We situate the research in the context of wider conceptual debates that call for a more inclusive approach to research on the work-life interface (Warren, 2021) and highlight implications for HR practitioners who want to offer such opportunities to low paid workers in sectors such as hospitality, while also recognizing the complex challenges such workers may face.

Details

Work-Life Inclusion: Broadening Perspectives Across the Life-Course
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-219-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Helen Bartlett

The consequences of population ageing for Australia are increasingly debated at a national and state level. Ageing issues on the policy agenda now reflect the need to take a…

3471

Abstract

The consequences of population ageing for Australia are increasingly debated at a national and state level. Ageing issues on the policy agenda now reflect the need to take a broader societal approach. However, the evidence to inform policy is still lacking in a number of areas. In particular, more needs to be understood about ageing from the community perspective, including evidence on values and attitudes across the generations and the expectations and needs of older age groups. This paper explores the evidence on community perspectives and attitudes on ageing and the extent to which it has informed policy and program development. Using illustrations from Queensland, key policy challenges presented by some of the broader emerging issues will be highlighted, along with possible strategies for policy development in the future.

Details

Foresight, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Galin Petrov Gornev

Aims to build a theory of human creativity on the premisses of autopoietic systems theory (AST) in contrast to the classical representationist paradigm. Correspondingly…

493

Abstract

Aims to build a theory of human creativity on the premisses of autopoietic systems theory (AST) in contrast to the classical representationist paradigm. Correspondingly, creativity is seen as an activity recurrently reproduced by couplings of specific states of moderate emotional arousal with “transitional” environments, i.e. “soft” social structures in which the world is permitted to be both subjective and objective; the archetype of these creative couplings can be found in the earliest “perfect environment” formed by the symbiotic infant‐mother relationship. Hypothesizes that these early states of synergy serve as centres of emotional gravity that are actively sought after by the mature creative person in his/her efforts to overcome splits of verbal space corresponding to schisms of cultural value and belief systems.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 26 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Gender, Athletes’ Rights, and the Court of Arbitration for Sport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-753-1

Abstract

Details

Gender, Athletes’ Rights, and the Court of Arbitration for Sport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-753-1

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Helen Lenskyj

The Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), created by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in 1983, resolves disputes between athletes and national or international sports…

Abstract

Purpose

The Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), created by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in 1983, resolves disputes between athletes and national or international sports governing bodies. The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the history and functions of CAS, with a particular focus on the ways in which athletes’ rights are threatened by the IOC’s Code of Sports-Related Arbitration.

Design/methodology/approach

The author reviews relevant law literature and media sources.

Findings

The concept of lex sportiva (global sport law), general arbitration practices and controversies concerning CAS’s impartiality are investigated, and the “strict liability” principle that CAS applies to doping allegations is assessed. This analysis points to a long record of inconsistencies and contradictions in the history and function of CAS. The findings lead to questions of arbitration or litigation; confidential or public proceedings; specialist or generalist arbitrators; lex sportiva or international legal principles; precedential or non-precedential awards; and civil or criminal burden of proof.

Originality/value

These unresolved issues demonstrate how the IOC struggles to maintain supremacy over world sport by promoting sport exceptionalism, and provide possible grounds for athletes’ future challenges to CAS.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Gender, Athletes’ Rights, and the Court of Arbitration for Sport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-753-1

Book part
Publication date: 28 September 2018

Helen Jefferson Lenskyj

Abstract

Details

Gender, Athletes’ Rights, and the Court of Arbitration for Sport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-753-1

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Helen Francis

The discourse of human resource management (HRM) is increasingly dominated by a normative, consensus‐oriented perspective on managing the employment relationship. This paper aims…

1890

Abstract

Purpose

The discourse of human resource management (HRM) is increasingly dominated by a normative, consensus‐oriented perspective on managing the employment relationship. This paper aims to explore the potential of critical discourse analysis (CDA) to provide new and different understandings of HRM and processes of organisational change, and which highlights the creative role of language in the shaping of organisation and management practice.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study analysis of managers' experiences of introducing change in a large catering firm is drawn upon to highlight the inherent tensions in people management, which stem from the need for employers to motivate and control labour in order to remain profitable. This is illustrated in a change programme aimed at increasing organisational efficiency and achieving a “results driven culture” that exhorted managers to think and behave as “entrepreneurs” and to “comply” with stringent new rules on managing their staff.

Findings

It is concluded that conflict and resistance is an inevitable feature of HRM‐based initiatives and that CDA offers a powerful lens for exploring this dynamic. Importantly, it provides a less restrictive view of management decision making than that found in conventional understandings of HRM, which tend to treat management as a more or less culturally unified body, and ignores the subjectivity of managers. In contrast, the empirical evidence presented here provides an example of how the deployment of CDA can provide rich insights into the dynamics of HRM‐based change rooted in a complex shifting network of alliances (and related discourses).

Originality/value

Focus is placed on how concepts, objects and subject positions are constituted through language and embedded in power relations.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

1 – 10 of 33