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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Helen Connor and Sue Shaw

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a selection of papers on the subject of graduate training and development, covering current trends and issues.

11489

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a selection of papers on the subject of graduate training and development, covering current trends and issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper outlines the special issue which identifies developments in the field of training for graduates, recruitment, their transition to work, and their continuous development.

Findings

The papers discuss various ways that generational differences play in competitiveness and success among graduates and it is argued that “Generation Y” possess very different characteristics from their predecessor generations. Companies have become more wise to recruitment, managing the pool of talent with potential positions in mind.

Originality/value

This paper, a part of the special issue, considers recent developments in the field of graduate recruitment and development.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Brenda Little

The purpose of this article is to explore to what extent there are variations in the development of graduates once in employment; to what extent these variations can be…

1645

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to explore to what extent there are variations in the development of graduates once in employment; to what extent these variations can be explained by differences in the higher education systems; and what the current moves towards greater harmonisation between these systems might mean for graduates' continuing professional development in employment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from the graduating cohort of 1999/2000 across 11 European countries, five years after graduation. The views of higher education providers and employers on graduates in the knowledge society were investigated in a smaller sub‐set of countries.

Findings

There are differences in the incidence and length of UK graduates' initial training in employment compared to all graduates which can be explained, in part, by the traditionally looser “fit” between higher education and employment in the UK (compared to many continental European countries). Five years after graduation, UK graduates enjoy similar levels of work‐related training as their European counterparts, although there are quite large differences between employment sectors.

Originality/value

This article looks into what extent harmonisation of higher education programmes (arising from the Bologna process) will affect the relationship between higher education and employment, and in particular the role played by higher education and by employers in graduates' initial professional formation and continuing development; it will be of interest to those in that field.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Sue Shaw and David Fairhurst

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of generational difference and reflect on how this might impact on organisational approaches to graduate development.

16520

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of generational difference and reflect on how this might impact on organisational approaches to graduate development.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores the characteristics of Generation Y graduates and the implications of their entry into the workplace for organisations' graduate learning and development programmes, drawing on academic and popular literature and the organisational experience of one major employer of young people.

Findings

This paper presents a profile of Generation Y and suggests that the learning styles and expectations of this group are very different from earlier generations. Using its experiences of employing Generation Y the case study organisation suggests future graduate development schemes need to utilise the latest technology to deliver audio‐visually rich, multi‐tasking challenges which require a collaborative approach, offer instant feedback whilst at the same time recognising that its participants may not see the need for or indeed take responsibility for their own development or its perceived failings.

Research limitations/implications

The paper suggests that further in‐depth research into Generation Y and organisational graduate development schemes is necessary to determine how far such schemes are meeting expectations.

Practical implications

Employers of graduates need to evaluate the effectiveness of their programmes.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this paper is to highlight how employers, and particularly graduate development managers, need to re‐examine their graduate development schemes to ensure they are not only meeting the needs and expectations of the organisation but also the individuals for whom they are designed.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Shirley Jenner

The purpose of this paper is to examine the evolution of an employee opinion survey and to evaluate its impact on the graduate training programme and associated employment…

3041

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the evolution of an employee opinion survey and to evaluate its impact on the graduate training programme and associated employment relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a detailed, longitudinal case study of one large‐scale UK organisation. The approach recognises that discursive resources have a material existence in the sense that they are embodied in the social practices of individuals and the institutions and organisations within which these social practices take place. Drawing on qualitative and quantitative data, the paper demonstrates how the design, delivery and evaluation of the graduate programme formed a learning nexus between management, graduates and other stakeholders.

Findings

The case study highlights the contested nature of organisational life, particularly in relation to matters of control and autonomy. However, improved graduate opinion survey ratings over time suggest that the evolving surveillance offered by internal research has been successful in achieving changed management behaviours. The case study has shown how graduate training, development and career management are best understood as discursive practices. Shared understandings about the nature of work are constructed though a communications nexus of key stakeholders.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this paper is to highlight the pivotal role of the corporate training programme and associated communications in the development of shared understandings of the nature of the employment relationship.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Jacques Angot, Hedley Malloch and Birgit Kleymann

The paper aims to show how professional identity is constructed at a very early stage of initial management education. In so doing, it questions the notion of le métier in…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to show how professional identity is constructed at a very early stage of initial management education. In so doing, it questions the notion of le métier in management.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a study of the experiences of six French management apprentices (or apprentis) who participated in a management apprentice programme in 2005. The research methodology is qualitative and illuminates the process of professional identity building. The central question of the study concerns the manager as an individual, an actor, and the link between the individual and his or her métier.

Findings

The findings suggest that from their very first immersion into the real world of corporate employment at junior management level, students construct different types of professional identity which can be shown as a 2×2 matrix whose independent axes are the type of acting displayed by the apprentis; and the degree to which the apprentis enacted their roles. This can be interpreted using the coupling system metaphor. Some of these types of professional identity are born of cynicism and disillusion engendered by their experiences.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on a small number of students drawn from one business school and concentrated in one job function – marketing.

Practical implications

The paper draws attention to the implications of the findings for those in business schools and organisations concerned with the formation of professional identity in young graduates.

Originality/value

The article proposes a new model for the formation of professional identity; and is the first study that deals with the French Apprenti manager programme.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Hugh O'Donnell, Takis Karallis, Eric Sandelands, James Cassin and Donal O'Neill

The aim of this paper is to outline the approach and process in place within Kentz Engineers & Constructors to develop graduate engineers on an international basis.

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to outline the approach and process in place within Kentz Engineers & Constructors to develop graduate engineers on an international basis.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach adopted is that of a case study which describes activities and processes within the organization and the rationale behind them, supported by appropriate material. The case study is based upon threads of experiences within the organization over an extended period of some years.

Findings

Findings include the need to facilitate experiential learning and provide mentoring within a socialization as well as developmental process.

Research limitations/implications

This is a case study focusing on the experiences and practices of one organization. It does not represent an empirical study. However, it contains insights that may be of practical value within businesses and other organizations seeking to develop graduate engineers, or, more broadly, seeking to manage the transition of new workers.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates the approach of one international organization to the development of graduate engineers within the construction industry.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 June 2008

Cecilia Hegarty and Janet Johnston

This paper aims to explore graduate training through SME‐based project work. The views and behaviours of graduates are examined along with the perceptions of the SMEs and…

1326

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore graduate training through SME‐based project work. The views and behaviours of graduates are examined along with the perceptions of the SMEs and academic partner institutions charged with training graduates.

Design/methodology/approach

The data are largely qualitative and derived from the experiences of graduates, company supervisors and University of Ulster staff involved in projects during 2001‐2007 when 140 FUSION projects were undertaken across the island of Ireland.

Findings

More job opportunities, changing job values and work ethic impact upon the uptake and success of FUSION projects. Employers, especially within growing SMEs, have adopted a learner‐centred approach in order to maximise the benefits of the project for both the graduate and the company. Graduate development programmes continue to strengthen university‐to‐business links, which in turn ensures graduate output meets the needs of industry.

Research limitations/implications

Data collected throughout the term of FUSION projects are reported; further analyses of stakeholder views post‐project completion would provide further insight into the longer‐term effects of graduate training upon career progression.

Practical implications

This analysis proffers graduate reflections on “work‐based learning”. It serves key reminders for evaluating satisfaction with graduate development programmes presenting two key implications, pathways for better preparing graduates/SMEs and routes for enhancing the benefits of such projects.

Originality/value

The paper focuses on research that seeks to enhance graduate training and placement experiences within SMEs.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Helen Connor

The second in a series of four articles that seek to answer questions about where and where not action learning is most applicable. Aims to identify the kinds of people…

398

Abstract

The second in a series of four articles that seek to answer questions about where and where not action learning is most applicable. Aims to identify the kinds of people who benefit most from action learning and the most appropriate times in their lives to undertake an action learning programme. The authors reflect on their own experience as action learning participants and set advisers to identify those who have got most and least out of action learning. Concludes that action learning has worked best with people who are willing and able to take action, are skilled at reflection and want to take responsibility for their own learning. Such people are likely to be mature adults who want to learn about themselves, as well as the world they inhabit, with a view to changing both themselves and their worlds.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

176

Abstract

Details

Education + Training, vol. 43 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

292

Abstract

Details

Education + Training, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

1 – 10 of 228