Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Helen Brown and Fiona Howlett

The purpose of this paper is to critically evaluate an innovative collaboration between health, housing and social care by exploring the “short stay project” apartments…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically evaluate an innovative collaboration between health, housing and social care by exploring the “short stay project” apartments from service users’ perspectives and considering the effectiveness of this service model as part of enabling provision locally.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative methodology for this evaluation was interpretative phenomenological analysis (Smith, 2011), critically exploring service users’ personal lived experience of the “short stay project”. Three service users (n=3) participated in semi-structured interviews.

Findings

This study has identified the “short stay project” can prevent admission into and facilitate discharge from care and health services by offering a temporary stay in self-contained, adapted accommodation. Service users found value in staying at the apartments for differing reasons. However, practitioners must address service users’ emotional and social needs as well as physical needs to reduce the risk of occupational deprivation.

Research limitations/implications

Sample size is not fully representative of the total population making transferability limited.

Practical implications

This research found there is demand for temporary housing provision for service users with health, housing and/or social care needs.

Social implications

Key drivers of demand for the service are social inequalities relating to homelessness, poverty and gender-based violence rather than the health-related issues that could have been expected. Further research into the development of effective integrated services which maximise service users’ wellbeing and occupational performance is recommended.

Originality/value

Service models which integrate health, housing and social care can be innovative and maintain service users’ independence and wellbeing in the community. Commissioners across health, housing and social care could utilise the Better Care Fund to deliver integrated services to meet rising demands.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 August 2019

Ellis Cashmore

Abstract

Details

Kardashian Kulture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-706-7

Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Torres L. Brown

Technology proliferation is on a movement to outpace an 18th-century computing industry paradigm known as “Moore’s law.” This law establishes the rate of technological…

Abstract

Technology proliferation is on a movement to outpace an 18th-century computing industry paradigm known as “Moore’s law.” This law establishes the rate of technological advancements. The premise of this edict is evident in our coupled workplace with the integration of an emerging technology known as Ambient Intelligence (Aml).

The modernization of the traditional office is designed to be collaborative and environment-friendly. Modernization is primarily due to ambient intelligence. “Opportunities for process and business improvements will derive from a “real-world Web” of smart objects and ambient intelligence, and from consumer-oriented trends such as Web business platforms, aesthetic design, and mobile robots as they move into the business world” (Fenn and Smith, 2005, para. 1). It is safe to reason that ambient intelligence is on a trendy trajectory in many business-oriented workplaces, worksites and workspaces. The business culture is inconspicuously changing before our eyes. Architects and designers are seamlessly incorporating this trend into their respective end-to-end processes of constructing new or retrofitting existing office spaces.

Its unnoticeably embedded adoption is in conference rooms, doorways, elevators, escalators, lighting, meeting rooms, phone displays, and walkways. As ambient technology naturally collides with the functional way an office professional interactively operates through a usual workday, its adaptation becomes seemingly smart and swift. The interesting facet of this technology is that one would not know it unless it was pointed out.

Although there are equipment and devices that offer a singular approach of being convenient and hands-free, there exist common misconceptions and unassuming annoyances that are in place as inherent issues. Once the work environment impedes productivity or natural flow of movement, we realize something is different. These differences align to the surrounding tangible and intangible cues. The information presented in this chapter will disclose the underlying issues at a practical level.

Details

Advances in the Technology of Managing People: Contemporary Issues in Business
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-074-6

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 April 2003

Lawrence Angus, Ilana Snyder and Wendy Sutherland-Smith

This chapter reports research conducted in Melbourne, Australia that is focused on the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in schools and families…

Abstract

This chapter reports research conducted in Melbourne, Australia that is focused on the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in schools and families. The emphasis is on the relationship between technology, learning, culture and (dis)advantage. It is generally agreed that ICTs are associated with major social, cultural, pedagogical and lifestyle changes, although the nature of those changes is subject to conflicting norms and interpretations. In this chapter we adopt a critical, multi-disciplined, relational perspective in order to examine the influence of ICTs, in schools and homes, on a sample of students and their families.

Details

Investigating Educational Policy Through Ethnography
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-018-0

Book part
Publication date: 6 December 2004

Lawrence Angus, Wendy Sutherland-Smith and Ilana Snyder

Because access to new technologies is unequally distributed, there has been considerable discussion in Australia and elsewhere about the growing gap, the “digital divide,”…

Abstract

Because access to new technologies is unequally distributed, there has been considerable discussion in Australia and elsewhere about the growing gap, the “digital divide,” between the information-rich and information-poor (Bolt & Crawford, 2000; Castells, 2001; Companie, 2001; Gordon, 2001; Haywood, 1998; Negroponte, 1996; Nixon, 2001). Most schools have incorporated computers and Internet access into classrooms, partly in response to concerns about the gap between technology “haves” and “have nots” (Facer et al., 2001). Such concerns have led to high-profile information technology policy initiatives in the USA (Lentz, 2000; US Department of Commerce, 1999), U.K. (Selwyn, 2000), Australia (Foster, 2000) and other nations. Many families have invested in computer systems at home in order to provide their children with access to the growing body of information available through technology. Similarly, in an attempt to “redress the balance between the information rich and poor” by providing “equal access to the World Wide Web” (Virtual Communities, 2002), the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU), Virtual Communities (a computer/software distributor) and Primus (an Internet provider) in late 1999 formed an alliance to offer relatively inexpensive computer and Internet access to union members in order to make “technology affordable for all Australians” (Virtual Communities, 2002).

Details

Ethnographies of Educational and Cultural Conflicts: Strategies and Resolutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-275-7

Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Jennifer Scanlon

This article aims to explore the work lives and contributions of a group of women employed at the J. Walter Thompson advertising agency in the early twentieth century.

1785

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to explore the work lives and contributions of a group of women employed at the J. Walter Thompson advertising agency in the early twentieth century.

Design/methodology/approach

Archival source material from the J. Walter Thompson Company archives at Duke University includes personnel files, advertising campaign reports, and meeting minutes. The archival work is placed in historical context.

Findings

The J. Walter Thompson Women's Editorial Department played a significant role in the development of advertising and in furthering women's opportunities as advertising professionals.

Originality/value

Advertising was one of the few male‐dominated professions open to women in the early years of the twentieth century. An exploration of these women's work experiences greatly enhances our understanding of the field, of women's roles as advertisers, and of women's roles as consumers.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 April 2018

Helen Brown Coverdale

The chapter reflects on the strengths and limitations of David Carpenter’s proposal to support the work of research ethics committees through consideration of the virtues…

Abstract

The chapter reflects on the strengths and limitations of David Carpenter’s proposal to support the work of research ethics committees through consideration of the virtues required by their members. Carpenter’s approach has many strengths, responsibilising researchers and ethics committees, and increasing the scope for robust and active theoretical engagement with ethical issues. I bring two alternative perspectives on research ethics to bear on this discussion. First, I discuss work in care ethics and relational ethics, approaches to ethics that have some similarities with virtue ethics but also distinct differences. Bruce Macfarlane’s text, on which Carpenter draws, notes care ethics briefly. I offer a more detailed consideration of what this perspective can offer, both for research ethics and for the virtuous research ethics committee. This helps to identify the relationships that are missing from a virtue ethics focus. Further, a context sensitive relational approach suggests ways in which we can strengthen Carpenter’s proposals to help research ethics committees select between competing principles or virtues. Second, my research ethics expertise is in undergraduate teaching for a multidisciplinary course, and an enquiry-based learning programme, which allows students in mixed discipline groups to plan, conduct, report and present their own original social research. The research skills training provided includes an interactive introduction to research ethics, what they are for and why they matter. Since we aim to offer practical guidance to research ethics committees when they consider what they should do and how this should be done, such a first principles approach may be useful.

Details

Virtue Ethics in the Conduct and Governance of Social Science Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-608-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1930

WE write on the eve of an Annual Meeting of the Library Association. We expect many interesting things from it, for although it is not the first meeting under the new…

Abstract

WE write on the eve of an Annual Meeting of the Library Association. We expect many interesting things from it, for although it is not the first meeting under the new constitution, it is the first in which all the sections will be actively engaged. From a membership of eight hundred in 1927 we are, in 1930, within measurable distance of a membership of three thousand; and, although we have not reached that figure by a few hundreds—and those few will be the most difficult to obtain quickly—this is a really memorable achievement. There are certain necessary results of the Association's expansion. In the former days it was possible for every member, if he desired, to attend all the meetings; today parallel meetings are necessary in order to represent all interests, and members must make a selection amongst the good things offered. Large meetings are not entirely desirable; discussion of any effective sort is impossible in them; and the speakers are usually those who always speak, and who possess more nerve than the rest of us. This does not mean that they are not worth a hearing. Nevertheless, seeing that at least 1,000 will be at Cambridge, small sectional meetings in which no one who has anything to say need be afraid of saying it, are an ideal to which we are forced by the growth of our numbers.

Details

New Library World, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 18 May 2022

Abstract

Details

Fandom Culture and The Archers
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-970-5

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Helen Brown

Sexual offences are committed against women tourists in Nepal by men working in tourism. The authorities do not remove known offenders from positions of trust. Women who…

2923

Abstract

Sexual offences are committed against women tourists in Nepal by men working in tourism. The authorities do not remove known offenders from positions of trust. Women who speak out suffer repeated abuse and trauma. Since complaints are disregarded, these offences are widely denied. Describes an activist strategy on the Internet to persuade the Nepalese authorities and travel industry to take effective steps against the abuse of tourists. The author’s Website raises awareness of the problem. It contained, first, an interactive form to protest to the travel industry and authorities of Nepal, now it carries a request for victims of abuse to make contact. Aims to oblige the Nepalese to make changes in favour of women’s human rights, which will give leverage to press for an end to sex trafficking.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 11 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000