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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Terceira A. Berdahl and Helen A. Moore

Purpose: to explore the experiences of employees in a local bank merger in the United States and examine the concept of job exit queues. We introduce the concept of a job…

Abstract

Purpose: to explore the experiences of employees in a local bank merger in the United States and examine the concept of job exit queues. We introduce the concept of a job exit queue, which describes how workers position themselves or are positioned by employers to leave jobs and enter new jobs following the announcement of a corporate merger. Design/methodology/approach: Qualitative interviews with mid‐ level managers, technical specialists and low status workers during the sale and merger process were conducted and coded thematically. We explore: (1) how workers and managers describe the job search as an “opportunity” or as a recurring cycle of low‐wage, high‐turnover work and (2) how severance packages structure the job exit queue to meet corporate needs. Findings: The role of severance pay is pivotal in understanding women’s and men’s job relations to job exit queues. We conclude that employers create job exit queues, placing low status workers and mid‐level women managers with less formal education at a disadvantage in reemployment. Value: This paper contributes a new concept “job exit queue” to the research and theory on work place diversity, gender inequality, and queuing theories.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 23 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Denis Adams, Albakri Ahmad, Doug Haynes and Jim Sheehan

Begins by summarizing Stafford Beer's minimal model proposed in his report on the organization of Manchester Business School in 1970, and the conclusions made by Sir…

Abstract

Begins by summarizing Stafford Beer's minimal model proposed in his report on the organization of Manchester Business School in 1970, and the conclusions made by Sir Douglas Hague, when Beer's model was used as a framework to examine current business school practices and a vision for the twenty‐first century. To facilitate learning in a “reality” which closely resembled situations in A‐space, a business simulator course was designed and its cybernetics is explained to show how Beer's ideas were actually used to teach Beer's ideas. Also delineates the experiences of the students' practical use of Beer's VSM. Continuing the theme to interplay teaching, research and consultancy, describes the concept, model and the implementation of Janus — The Centre for Systems Thinking and Organizational Transformation; a centre for those who wish to study, develop, apply and promote Stafford Beer's ideas and works.

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Kybernetes, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Carolyn Summerbell, Helen Moore and Claire O’Malley

– The purpose of this paper is to review the evidence base for effective public health interventions which aim to improve the diet of children aged zero to three years.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the evidence base for effective public health interventions which aim to improve the diet of children aged zero to three years.

Design/methodology/approach

General review.

Findings

Key approaches and components of effective interventions include: repeated tasting, parental modelling, use of rewards, moderate restriction of “unhealthy” foods alongside an increase in portion sizes of fruits and vegetables, culturally appropriate messages, culturally acceptable health care provider, sufficient intensity of intervention, and an intervention which targets parental self-efficacy and modelling. Interventions which provide home visits (rather than require visits to a GP surgery or local community centre) financial incentives and/or mobile phone reminders may increase retention, particularly for some individuals. Recruiting mothers into programmes whilst they are pregnant may improve recruitment and retention rates.

Originality/value

Allows for key public health interventions, approaches and components to be explored and identified. This will ensure that there is guidance to inform the development of new interventions for this age group and more importantly recommend that those components which are most successful be incorporated in policy and practice.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

John F. Wallace and Martin F. Parnell

Examines in depth the practical realities and difficulties ofinitiating and sustaining a major tourism development project which isintended to further economic…

Abstract

Examines in depth the practical realities and difficulties of initiating and sustaining a major tourism development project which is intended to further economic regeneration and job‐creation and is funded in partnership with the European Union. The financial framework of the scheme, the “Hotties” in St Helens (Merseyside), is provided by the European Structural Funds including the RECHAR Initiative. The contribution of the European Regional Development Fund and the European Social Fund are also evaluated. In addition the purportedly complementary role of central government is addressed, through the Urban Programme and City Challenge schemes. Two fundamental issues emerge as crucially governing outcomes: the precise structure and nature of the complex public/private partnerships involved; and vexed problem of “additionality”, which remains an unresolved matter. Clearly demonstrates the urgent need for far greater integration and co‐ordination of public policy and the rationalization of the application and implementation procedures.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 95 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2008

Helen Moore

Interest in the role of the New Zealand School Journal as an officially sanctioned publication for schools, has resulted in a number of past studies exploring its…

Abstract

Interest in the role of the New Zealand School Journal as an officially sanctioned publication for schools, has resulted in a number of past studies exploring its relationship to official curriculum, educational policy and wider socio‐political developments, largely in relation to the written text. This article focuses on selected visual imagery, drawing on a masters study that examined discourses of art and identity through an interdisciplinary approach. Primary sources such as the School Journal publications themselves, material from the National Archives, and the stories of illustrators (gathered through a variety of communications including oral history), contributed a range of voices to the research. This article addresses some of the themes identified in relation to post World War 2 discourses of identity seeking to construct a sense of New Zealandness in educational publications. Acknowledging the role of imagery in educational publication itself offers another voice in constructing our educational history.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 24 January 2011

Paul Moores, Rebecca Fish and Helen Duperouzel

This article is written from the point of view of a service user who is involved in training staff about working with people who self‐injure in the secure learning…

Abstract

This article is written from the point of view of a service user who is involved in training staff about working with people who self‐injure in the secure learning disability service where he lives.• I am a service user living in a secure unit who talks to staff in training about self‐injury.• I do an hour each month answering questions and I get paid for it.• I enjoy training the staff and it has made me more confident.• I get some good feedback about my work from the staff.• I wanted to tell other people about this experience.• This report is made of parts of a recorded interview that I did with a member of staff and meetings with her to write this into an article.

Details

Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0927

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Alice Moore and Helen Lynch

Play occupation has been identified as an essential part of children’s lives, and it subsequently features in paediatric occupational therapy. However, few studies address…

Abstract

Purpose

Play occupation has been identified as an essential part of children’s lives, and it subsequently features in paediatric occupational therapy. However, few studies address the current place of play and play occupation in occupational therapy practice. This study aims to address this gap in knowledge by exploring paediatric occupational therapists’ perspectives on the place of play and play occupation in occupational therapy practice in Ireland.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional online survey was conducted to gather data about the current use of play in the occupational therapy for children under 12 years. Convenience sampling and snowball recruitment techniques were used to recruit paediatric occupational therapists. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and qualitative content analysis.

Findings

In total, 65 therapists responded to the survey (estimated response rate, 32%). Results are organised into four sections: demographics and practice context, play assessment practices, use of play in practice and perceived barriers to play-centred practice. Respondents reported that they valued play as a childhood occupation. However, the survey findings identified that the primary focus was on play as a means to an end. Lack of education on play (research, theory and interventions) and pressures in the workplace have been identified as barriers to play-centred practice.

Research limitations/implications

Findings indicate that there is a mismatch between therapists valuing play as an occupation and how play is used in occupational therapy practice. Unless clarifications are made about play occupation as being different to skills acquisition in childhood, play occupation will continue to get overlooked as an authentic concern of occupation-centred practice. Thus, play as occupation deserves further attention from educators, researchers and practitioners as a means of strengthening occupation-centred practice, in particular play-centred practice in the paediatric context.

Originality/value

Play has been described as an important occupation in childhood, and consequently, it features in paediatric occupational therapy. However, little is known about the current place of play in occupational therapy practice. This study addresses this gap by considering the current place of play in occupational therapy practice in Ireland.

Details

Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-8819

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Book part
Publication date: 16 March 2021

Helen M Burrows

Social Work education has seen some changes since my first paper on how The Archers could be used to enhance a student's understanding of service user experiences…

Abstract

Social Work education has seen some changes since my first paper on how The Archers could be used to enhance a student's understanding of service user experiences (Burrows, 2016). Social Work students still, however, need to understand the difficulties that their future service users may experience; learning is developed through lectures, seminars and workshops, and most of all through practice experience, but a real challenge for educators is how to show students the constant lived reality of families and communities who have complex difficulties. A visit to a household only gives a snapshot of their life, and service users may be guarded in their behaviour during a professional visit. My original paper considered the educational value of the ‘fly-on-the-wall’ perspective of The Archers, in catching unguarded moments and drawing attention to issues in the community. From the impact of rural poverty and unaffordable housing, through issues of mental health, hospital discharge, to adult survivors of child sexual abuse and the tangled webs of modern slavery, these issues will resonate with any social worker, in Adult, Children and Families or Mental Health fields. These are not just issues in a rural setting; professionals in more urban settings will recognise these as things the families and individuals they work with must deal with from time to time.

Details

Flapjacks and Feudalism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-389-5

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Andrea Begley, Danielle Gallegos and Helen Vidgen

The purpose of this paper is to assess the effectiveness of cooking skill interventions (CSIs) targeting adults to improve dietary intakes in public health nutrition settings.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the effectiveness of cooking skill interventions (CSIs) targeting adults to improve dietary intakes in public health nutrition settings.

Design/methodology/approach

A scoping review of the literature was used to identify and assess the quality and effectiveness of Australian single-strategy CSIs and multi-strategy programmes that included cooking for independent healthy people older than 16 years from 1992 to 2015.

Findings

There were only 15 interventions (n=15) identified for review and included CSIs as single strategies (n=8) or as part of multi-strategy programmes (n=7) over 23 years. The majority of the interventions were rated as weak in quality (66 per cent) due to their study design, lack of control groups, lack of validated evaluation measures and small sample sizes. Just over half (53 per cent) of the CSIs reviewed described some measurement related to improved dietary behaviours.

Research limitations/implications

There is inconclusive evidence that CSIs are effective in changing dietary behaviours in Australia. However, they are valued by policymakers and practitioners and used in public health nutrition programmes, particularly for indigenous groups.

Originality/value

This is the first time that CSIs have been reviewed in an Australian context and they provide evidence of the critical need to improve the quality CSIs to positively influence dietary behaviour change in Australia.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2019

Helen St Clair-Thompson and Carla Chivers

It is well established that there are several benefits of taking a placement year, for example, higher academic attainment, the acquisition of transferable skills and…

Abstract

Purpose

It is well established that there are several benefits of taking a placement year, for example, higher academic attainment, the acquisition of transferable skills and enhanced employability. It is therefore important to understand why students choose to take or not to take a placement. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

In the current study, 159 first year students studying psychology were asked about their perceptions of the advantages and disadvantages of taking a psychology professional placement year. Their responses were analysed using thematic analysis, and the number of participants who provided information relating to each main theme was also tabulated.

Findings

Students perceived the main benefits of placements as relating to career certainty, future prospects, experience, knowledge and skills. In contrast, they perceived the main disadvantages as practical disadvantages, social/emotional disadvantages, difficulty, and there being no guaranteed benefit of a placement.

Practical implications

The results are discussed in terms of their potential to inform practices for developing and enhancing psychology placements within higher education. For example, providing further empirical evidence of the benefits of placements may help staff in higher education to further promote placement years.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the knowledge of perceived advantages and disadvantages of taking a placement in psychology. Placements in psychology are likely to be very beneficial for employability, but are often only available on a voluntary basis.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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