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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2017

Babak Taheri, Filipe J. Coelho, Carlos M.P. Sousa and Heiner Evanschitzky

Customers play a key role in value creation. Not surprisingly, research has investigated customers’ motivations to engage in the creation of value. Thus, this study aims…

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Abstract

Purpose

Customers play a key role in value creation. Not surprisingly, research has investigated customers’ motivations to engage in the creation of value. Thus, this study aims to assess the link between mood-regulatory processes and customer participation in value creation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study develops a model that relates mood-regulatory processes to customer participation and customer value creation, and tests it with a sample of 419 hotel customers, using partial least squares estimation.

Findings

It is found that mood clarity relates directly with customer relational value; mood monitoring relates directly with customer participation as well as directly and indirectly with customer economic and relational value; and mood repair relates directly with customer participation and customer economic value, as well as indirectly with customer economic and relational value.

Research limitations/implications

This is a cross-sectional study limited only to hotels in Iran. This is the first study to evaluate the relationship between mood regulation with customer participation and value creation. Hospitality service organizations interested in promoting customer participation may consider mood as a segmentation criterion.

Originality/value

Value creation theory was applied to identify the relationship among customer mood regulation, participation, economic value and relational value, as it is first attempted in the hospitality studies.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2019

Mozard Mohtar, John M. Rudd and Heiner Evanschitzky

This paper aims to investigate the variations in brand personality trait items to describe both global and local brands in Malaysia.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the variations in brand personality trait items to describe both global and local brands in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopted both factor analytic and experimental methods to investigate the internal and external validity of Malaysia brand personality (MBP) scale. They followed a stringent scale development process that ensures the scale conform to psychometric properties.

Findings

In seven studies, the results show that the 22-item four-factor Malaysian brand personality scale adheres to strong psychometric properties of scale development process. The findings further indicate that there are seven indigenous traits, while most traits emerge from factor analyses originate from studies of Aaker (1997) and colleagues (2001). This confirms universality of some brand personality traits and dimensions.

Research limitations/implications

Within the limits of the study, we did not examine the MBP facet level, and were confined to those respondents in Klang Valley only.

Practical implications

The MBP scale enables marketing managers in Malaysia to focus on brand personality dimensions that their customers can relate to. In other words, marketing communications can be more efficient when managers can identify brand personality traits that enhance customers’ behaviors and profitability.

Originality/value

Malaysia is a multicultural and multiethnic country which is increasingly becoming the focus of international brand expansion. The authors view that the development of the MBP scale is timely and should provide managers further insights into the brand personality structure that is relevant in Malaysia.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2020

Amela Dizdarevic, Heiner Evanschitzky and Christof Backhaus

  • Retail agglomerations are predestined to capitalise on the combination of the strengths of traditional retailing and digital service innovations.
  • Digital touchpoints can…

Abstract

Learning Outcomes

  • Retail agglomerations are predestined to capitalise on the combination of the strengths of traditional retailing and digital service innovations.

  • Digital touchpoints can enhance the visitor experience throughout the whole customer journey, that is not only on-site but also before reaching as well as after having left the agglomeration.

  • Digital service innovations can provide additional value to visitors of a retail agglomeration through four elements of the digital marketing mix: Information, orientation, communication and atmosphere.

  • Technologies like augmented reality (AR) or virtual reality (VR) can create unique and memorable customer experiences, ensuring that retailers and service providers as well as the retail agglomeration as a whole continue to thrive.

  • Key success factors for the implementation of digital services in the context of retail agglomerations include participative innovation processes, cooperation and the communication of clear benefits to stakeholders.

Retail agglomerations are predestined to capitalise on the combination of the strengths of traditional retailing and digital service innovations.

Digital touchpoints can enhance the visitor experience throughout the whole customer journey, that is not only on-site but also before reaching as well as after having left the agglomeration.

Digital service innovations can provide additional value to visitors of a retail agglomeration through four elements of the digital marketing mix: Information, orientation, communication and atmosphere.

Technologies like augmented reality (AR) or virtual reality (VR) can create unique and memorable customer experiences, ensuring that retailers and service providers as well as the retail agglomeration as a whole continue to thrive.

Key success factors for the implementation of digital services in the context of retail agglomerations include participative innovation processes, cooperation and the communication of clear benefits to stakeholders.

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

Gianfranco Walsh, Heiner Evanschitzky and Maren Wunderlich

Research on the relationship between customer satisfaction and customer loyalty has advanced to a stage that requires a more thorough examination of moderator variables…

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Abstract

Purpose

Research on the relationship between customer satisfaction and customer loyalty has advanced to a stage that requires a more thorough examination of moderator variables. Limited research shows how moderators influence the relationship between customer satisfaction and customer loyalty in a service context; this article aims to present empirical evidence of the conditions in which the satisfaction‐loyalty relationship becomes stronger or weaker.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of more than 700 customers of DIY retailers and multi‐group structural equation modelling, the authors examine moderating effects of several firm‐related variables, variables that result from firm/employee‐customer interactions and individual‐level variables (i.e. loyalty cards, critical incidents, customer age, gender, income, expertise).

Findings

The empirical results suggest that not all of the moderators considered influence the satisfaction‐loyalty link. Specifically, critical incidents and income are important moderators of the relationship between customer satisfaction and customer loyalty.

Practical implications

Several of the moderator variables considered in this study are manageable variables.

Originality/value

This study should prove valuable to academic researchers as well as service and retailing managers. It systematically analyses the moderating effect of firm‐related and individual‐level variables on the relationship between customer satisfaction and loyalty. It shows the differential effect of different types of moderator variables on the satisfaction‐loyalty link.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 42 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 February 2007

Peter Kenning, Heiner Evanschitzky, Verena Vogel and Dieter Ahlert

The aim of this study is to analyze consumers' price knowledge in the market for apparels.

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to analyze consumers' price knowledge in the market for apparels.

Design/methodology/approach

After reviewing earlier attempts at assessing the construct, the price estimation error “PEE” was used, a measure based on explicit price knowledge stored in long‐term memory, as a valid indicator of price knowledge.

Findings

The results, including data from about 1,527 consumers on 66 products from the German apparel market, indicate that price knowledge is relatively low.

Originality/value

Although, in the literature, there are several studies on price knowledge in the food industry, little is known about price knowledge in other industry sectors. This is quite surprising since pricing strategy is a concept which is vitally important to all retailers. Therefore, this study is a first contribution to extending the concept of behavioral pricing to the apparel market.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

Heiner Evanschitzky, Florian v. Wangenheim, David Woisetschläger and Markus Blut

International marketing researchers have long been concerned with determining whether consumers are predisposed towards a preference for domestic products, as opposed to…

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Abstract

Purpose

International marketing researchers have long been concerned with determining whether consumers are predisposed towards a preference for domestic products, as opposed to foreign products. The purpose of this paper is to assess such a domestic‐country bias (DCB) in the German market.

Design/methodology/approach

This study empirically investigates DCB across six countries and 14 product categories in the Germany market. By so doing, it replicates an earlier study conducted in the UK. Ordered logit analysis was employed as well as multidimensional unfolding to present results.

Findings

As in the study conducted in the UK, there is in general a strong DCB in the German market. However, it differs largely across the 14 product categories. Results indicate that consumer preference rankings can best be explained by a combination of demographic variables and country‐of‐origin effects.

Practical implications

Results indicate that domestic firms in Germany can well rely on a safeguarding effect when marketing their products. At the same time, managers from foreign countries cannot rely on consumer ethnocentrism as a reliable indicator of the inclination of consumers to downgrade their products.

Originality/value

This study confirms some findings from the UK. However, results from Germany indicate that at least economic competitiveness of the country‐of‐origin plays a role in determining respondents' judgments. This study underlines the value of replication studies in cross‐cultural settings in particular.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Khanyapuss Punjaisri, Alan Wilson and Heiner Evanschitzky

The purpose of this paper is to understand the internal branding process from the perspective of service providers in Thailand. It will reveal the key internal branding…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the internal branding process from the perspective of service providers in Thailand. It will reveal the key internal branding mechanisms and empirically assess the relationship between internal branding and employees' brand attitudes and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study representing the Thai hotel industry is adopted with mixed methodologies. In‐depth interviews are first carried out with 30 customer‐interface employees in six major hotels in Thailand. On a census basis, a quantitative survey with 699 respondents from five major hotels in Thailand follows.

Findings

Internal branding coordinating marketing with human resource management has a statistically significant impact on attitudinal and behavioural aspects of employees in their delivery of the brand promise. As employees' brand commitment do not have a statistically significant relationship with employees' brand performance, it is not regarded as a mediator in the link between internal branding and employees' brand performance.

Practical implications

A number of significant managerial implications are drawn from this study, for example using both internal communication and training to influence employees' brand‐supporting attitudes and behaviours. Still, it should be noted that the effect of internal branding on employee behaviours could be dependent on the extent to which it influences their brand attitudes.

Originality/value

The paper provides valuable insights, from the key internal audience's perspectives, into an internal branding process. It has empirically shown the relationship between internal branding and the behavioural outcome as well as the partial meditating effects of employees' brand identification, commitment and loyalty.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

Heiner Evanschitzky, Arun Sharma and Catja Prykop

Previous research has emphasized the pivotal role that salespeople play in customer satisfaction. In this regard, the relationship between salespeople's attitudes, skills…

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Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has emphasized the pivotal role that salespeople play in customer satisfaction. In this regard, the relationship between salespeople's attitudes, skills, and characteristics, and customer satisfaction remains an area of interest. The paper aims to make three contributions: first, it seeks to examine the impact of salespeople's satisfaction, adaptive selling, and dominance on customer satisfaction. Second, this research aims to use dyadic data, which is a better test of the relationships between constructs since it avoids common method variance. Finally, in contrast to previous research, it aims to test all of the customers of salespeople rather than customers selected by salespeople.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs multilevel analysis to examine the relationship between salespeople's satisfaction with the firm on customer satisfaction, using a dyadic, matched business‐to‐business sample of a large European financial service provider that comprises 188 customers and 18 employees.

Findings

The paper finds that customers' evaluation of service quality, product quality, and value influence customer satisfaction. The analysis at the selling firm's employee level shows that adaptive selling and employee satisfaction positively impact customer satisfaction, while dominance is negatively related to customer satisfaction.

Practical implications

Research shows that customer‐focus is a key driver in the success of service companies. Customer satisfaction is regarded as a prerequisite for establishing long‐term, profitable relations between company and customer, and customer contact employees are key to nurturing this relationship. The role of salespeople's attitudes, skills, and characteristics in the customer satisfaction process are highlighted in this paper.

Originality/value

The use of dyadic, multilevel studies to assess the nature of the relationship between employees and customers is, to date, surprisingly limited. The paper examines the link between employee attitudes, skills, and characteristics, and customer satisfaction in a business‐to‐business setting in the financial service sector, differentiating between customer‐ and employee‐level drivers of business customer satisfaction.

Article
Publication date: 24 April 2009

Khanyapuss Punjaisri, Heiner Evanschitzky and Alan Wilson

The purpose of this paper is to understand the internal branding process from the employees' perspective; it will empirically assess the relationship between internal…

13623

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the internal branding process from the employees' perspective; it will empirically assess the relationship between internal branding and employees' delivery of the brand promise as well as the relationships among their brand identification, brand commitment and brand loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

On a census basis, a quantitative survey is carried out with 699 customer‐interface employees from five major hotels.

Findings

Internal branding is found to have a positive impact on attitudinal and behavioural aspects of employees in their delivery of the brand promise. As employees' brand commitment does not have a statistically significant relationship with employees' brand performance, it is not regarded as a mediator in the link between internal branding and employees' brand performance. Furthermore, the study shows that brand identification is a driver of brand commitment, which precedes brand loyalty of employees.

Practical implications

A number of significant managerial implications are drawn from this study, for example using both internal communication and training to influence employees' brand‐supporting attitudes and behaviours. Still, it should be noted that the effect of internal branding on the behaviours could be dependent on the extent to which it could effectively influence their brand attitudes.

Originality/value

The results provide valuable insights from the key internal audience's perspectives into an internal branding process to ensure the delivery of the brand promise. It empirically shows the relationship between internal branding and the behavioural outcome as well as the meditational effects of employees' brand identification, commitment and loyalty.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2007

Heiner Evanschitzky, Dieter Ahlert, Günther Blaich and Peter Kenning

The main purpose of this paper is to analyze knowledge management in service networks. It analyzes the knowledge management process and identifies related challenges. The…

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Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this paper is to analyze knowledge management in service networks. It analyzes the knowledge management process and identifies related challenges. The authors take a strategic management approach instead of a more technology‐oriented approach, since it is believed that managerial problems still remain after technological problems are solved.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores the literature on the topic of knowledge management as well as the resource (or knowledge) based view of the firm. It offers conceptual insights and provides possible solutions for knowledge management problems.

Findings

The paper discusses several possible solutions for managing knowledge processes in knowledge‐intensive service networks. Solutions for knowledge identification/generation, knowledge application, knowledge combination/transfer and supporting the evolution of tacit network knowledge include personal and technological aspects, as well as organizational and cultural elements.

Practical implications

In a complex environment, knowledge management and network management become crucial for business success. It is the task of network management to establish routines, and to build and regularly refresh meta‐knowledge about the competencies and abilities that exist within the network. It is suggested that each network partner should be rated according to the contribution to the network knowledge base. Based on this rating, a particular network partner is a member of a certain knowledge club, meaning that the partner has access to a particular level of network knowledge. Such an established routine provides strong incentives to add knowledge to the network's knowledge base

Originality/value

This paper is a first attempt to outline the problems of knowledge management in knowledge‐intensive service networks and, by so doing, to introduce strategic management reasoning to the discussion.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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