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Article

Thomas Fischer and Heike Neuroth

Project SSG‐FI at the Lower Saxony State and University Library, Göttingen (Germany) provides special subject gateways to international high quality Internet resources for…

Abstract

Project SSG‐FI at the Lower Saxony State and University Library, Göttingen (Germany) provides special subject gateways to international high quality Internet resources for scientific users. Internet sites are selected by subject specialists and described using an extension of qualified Dublin Core metadata. A basic evaluation is added. These descriptions are freely available and can be searched and browsed. There are now subject gateways for three subject areas: earth sciences (Geo‐guide); mathematics (Mathguide); and Anglo‐American culture (split into History guide and Anglistik guide). Together they receive about 3,300 “hard” requests per day, thus reaching over 1 million requests per year. The project SSG‐FI behind these guides is open to collaboration. Institutions and private persons wishing to contribute can notify the SSG‐FI team or send full data sets. Regular contributors can request registration with the project to access the database via the Internet and create and edit records.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article

Almuth Gastinger

The purpose of this paper is to share with readers the issues of the 9th International Bielefeld Conference.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to share with readers the issues of the 9th International Bielefeld Conference.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a descriptive report.

Findings

The conference discussed essential current and future developments towards enhanced libraries and information infrastructures meeting the emerging demands of eScience and eLearning.

Originality/value

Will be of interest to library and information professionals.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 26 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article

Paula Goossens

The 25th annual seminar of the European Library Automation Group (ELAG) was held in Prague in June 2001. This report provides an overview of the papers presented…

Abstract

The 25th annual seminar of the European Library Automation Group (ELAG) was held in Prague in June 2001. This report provides an overview of the papers presented, including those describing relevant developments in the Czech Republic, those covering the theme of the seminar (the integration and linking of electronic resources), as well as papers on the functional requirements for bibliographic records (FRBR). Workshops are a key feature of ELAG seminars and the paper also reports on those held during the 2001 meeting.

Details

Program, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article

Kathrin Grzeschik, Yevgeniya Kruppa, Diana Marti and Paul Donner

The purpose of these experiments is to find out whether and how reading behavior might be influenced by reading devices.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of these experiments is to find out whether and how reading behavior might be influenced by reading devices.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, three experiments, the first one more independent from the second and third, investigate how European Library and Information Science students react to electronic reading devices, unfamiliar as they are with them. The second and third experiments explore implications such as reading rate, concentration and symptoms of fatigue in conjunction with electronic reading devices. Test objects were the Sony eBook Reader, the IREX iLiad, LCD computer screens, Laptops and the Smart Phone HTC Touch HD in comparison with printed documents and books.

Findings

Contrary to common opinion, the results indicate a trend that concentration and/or reading rates do not suffer from reading on electronic reading devices. Further, it was found that influences on reading rate and concentration are posed rather by the individual reading behavior of a person, as well as by the nature of a text (scholarly or novelistic), than by the reading devices used.

Research limitations/implications

Problems included the limited means to acquire technical support. The first experiment, in particular, suffered from inadequate equipment such as audio recordings that were too quiet. The value of the statistics is limited by the small number of test subjects and test runs. Additionally, the test persons had differing experience in reading with an electronic device. Two had used an electronic reading device before, whilst the others never had.

Originality/value

Based on the findings in recent literature, experiments such as this have rarely been conducted. Research in this particular field, i.e. print vs screen reading performance in adults, is sparse in recent history and more often done through examining personal preferences. To the knowledge of the authors, the research has never been done from the perspective of Library and Information Science (LIS). The preliminary results question common assumptions and theses.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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