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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Lynn A. Isabella, Jessica Pohl and Jason Sinnarajah

Hee Soap, Hee Soap,” Timothy Jones sang out in a mocking fashion towards Hee Seop Choi, a fellow learning team member at a noted graduate school of business. Hoping to…

Abstract

Hee Soap, Hee Soap,” Timothy Jones sang out in a mocking fashion towards Hee Seop Choi, a fellow learning team member at a noted graduate school of business. Hoping to gain the benefits from a diversity of resources, knowledge, and ideas, MBA students at this school were assigned to learning teams. Each member was specifically chosen with an effort to mix up gender, nationalities, professional backgrounds, and interests. But those advantages may be outweighed by problems stemming from multicultural differences. This case offers a disguised, yet real, team experience that can be used in the classroom to unpack how this richly diverse group had trouble getting along and why their personality clashes intensified. The opportunity to discuss the challenges in light of culture, and the difference between that and problems stemming from personalities will help students reap the benefits intrinsic in multicultural teams.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

M. Kessler and D.G. Feldmann

To develop a new, biodegradable hydraulic fluid, numerous standard and in‐house screening tests are necessary to verify the lubricating properties. It was further…

Abstract

To develop a new, biodegradable hydraulic fluid, numerous standard and in‐house screening tests are necessary to verify the lubricating properties. It was further determined that evaluation within a hydrostatic transmission, simulating field operating conditions, as a final test is critical but needed, as new fluids will occasionally fail this test, although all prior tests were passed. This paper describes recent experiences at the authors’ institute with ester based hydraulic fluids run in a heavily loaded hydrostatic transmission under laboratory conditions on the so‐called “flywheel test rig”. Change of fluid properties and wear behavior of the hydrostatic components are compared to derive statements about the fluids’ behavior to be expected in the field application.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 54 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2020

Juliana Thompson, Sue Tiplady, Phil Hodgson and Carole Proud

This study aims to scope the profile and application of an advanced clinical practitioner (ACP) roles in primary care in the North of England and how these roles meet the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to scope the profile and application of an advanced clinical practitioner (ACP) roles in primary care in the North of England and how these roles meet the requirements of Health Education England's (HEE’s) ACP workforce capability framework.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-stage design was used. Stage 1 analysed health and social care workforce intelligence reports to inform scoping of numbers of ACPs working in primary care. Stage 2 used two surveys. Survey 1 targeted ACP leads and collected strategic-level data about ACP application. Survey 2 targeted staff who perceived themselves to be working as ACPs. Survey 2 was in three parts. Part 1 collected demographic data. Part 2 required participants to record their perceived competence against each of the HEE ACP framework capability criteria. Part 3 required respondents to identify facilitators and barriers to ACP practice.

Findings

Despite the introduction of HEE's ACP capability framework, there is inconsistency and confusion about the ACP role. The results indicated a need for standardisation of role definition and educational and practice requirements. The results also suggested that some ACPs are not working to their full potential, while some staff who are employed as “gap-fillers” to provide routine clinical services perceive themselves as ACPs despite not working at the ACP level.

Originality/value

Although previous research has explored the application of ACP practice in primary care, few studies have considered ACP application in the light of the introduction of workforce capability frameworks aimed at standardising ACP practice.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2011

Roy Allen, Norman Bedford and András Margitay‐Becht

The purpose of this paper is to present a “human ecology economics (HEE)” framework for understanding economic growth and development challenges in Eastern Europe.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a “human ecology economics (HEE)” framework for understanding economic growth and development challenges in Eastern Europe.

Design/methodology/approach

The HEE approach relies on evolutionary and complex systems processes; it expands the field of ecological economics by incorporating interdisciplinary material from the humanities; and it allows a long‐run perspective with a focus on sustainability of human systems. Using this framework and primary research from Hungary, Estonia, and Azerbaijan, challenges to Eastern European development are identified.

Findings

The main limit to Eastern European sustainable development is not “production capital”, i.e. the availability of natural resources, fixed human‐made capital, and intermediate consumption, but instead shortages of “transaction capital”, i.e. “social capital, informational capital, and financial capital.”

Research limitations/implications

Rigorous analytical models of, and precise predictions of, change in the human ecology are at present not possible using evolutionary and complex systems approaches; however, Eastern Europe can be fruitfully studied through the HEE approach, and certain simulation methods and lessons from recent history are suggested.

Practical implications

Greater support for various kinds of transaction capital is recommended, including for social and communication networks, for information exchange between small and medium size businesses, for innovation and creative learning by doing, for financial intermediation, for better inter‐party cooperation at the national level, etc.

Social implications

The need for greater social cooperation, including a reduction in discrimination exercised by dominant individuals or groups, arises as a more important pre‐condition for sustainable economic growth than is commonly believed.

Originality/value

Scholars, policymakers, and practitioners might appreciate the more comprehensive interdisciplinary framework for understanding economic growth and development challenges in Eastern Europe, especially the role played by intangible belief systems, social agreements, and levels of cooperation.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 January 2021

Clare Edwards and Dominic Gilroy

This paper aims to demonstrate the approach taken in delivering the quality and impact elements of Knowledge for Healthcare, the strategic development framework for…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate the approach taken in delivering the quality and impact elements of Knowledge for Healthcare, the strategic development framework for National Health Service (NHS) library and knowledge services in England. It examines the work undertaken to enhance quality and demonstrate the value and impact of health library and knowledge services. It describes the interventions developed and implemented over a five-year period 2015–2020 and the move towards an outcome rather than process approach to impact and quality.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study illustrates a range of interventions that have been developed, including the outcomes of implementation to date. The methodology behind each intervention is informed by the evidence base and includes professional engagement.

Findings

The outcomes approach to the development and implementation of quality and impact interventions and assets provides evidence to demonstrate the value of library and knowledge staff to the NHS in England to both high-level decision-makers and service users.

Originality/value

The interventions are original concepts developed within the NHS to demonstrate system-wide impacts and change. The Evaluation Framework has been developed based on the impact planning and assessment (IPA) methodology. The interventions can be applied to other healthcare systems, and the generic learning is transferable to other library and knowledge sectors, such as higher education.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Virginia McCririck and Rhidian Hughes

NHS reforms in England led to the establishment of Local Education and Training Board (LETBs) to ensure the future supply of staff. LETBs have an important role in…

Abstract

Purpose

NHS reforms in England led to the establishment of Local Education and Training Board (LETBs) to ensure the future supply of staff. LETBs have an important role in addressing health and social care integration. This paper aims to stimulate debate, ideas and opportunities to improve integrated workforce planning, practice and policy.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a thought leadership article which presents a distillation of key policy and strategy, drawing out implications for policy makers and workforce planners at a strategic level.

Findings

The paper describes and critically appraises the role of LETBs in supporting integration between health and social care. The key messages include: ensure social care and public health representation on the board, track education and training decisions against commissioning priorities, focus on outcomes and transition points, build health‐related skills in social care, support providers and use performance measures of integration.

Practical implications

LETBs need to demonstrate an open and transparent approach to workforce education and planning. All partners need to engage including social care and public health service commissioners and providers.

Originality/value

There is a substantial body of literature on integration, although much less is devoted to examining workforce. This article will be of particular interest to LETB leaders, those responsible for reviewing and assessing the performance of LETBs as well as social care leaders and workforce planners. In addition the article will be of interest to those supporting integrated workforce planning and development across the UK and internationally.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Myung Ja Kim, Woo Gon Kim, Joung Man Kim and Chulwon Kim

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships among determinant (ease of use), extrinsic (usefulness) and intrinsic motivations (enjoyment), attachment and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships among determinant (ease of use), extrinsic (usefulness) and intrinsic motivations (enjoyment), attachment and usage intention regarding seniors’ use of mobile devices for tourism. In addition, this study examines the moderating role of knowledge in these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers collected data via online surveys to reach the target population of this study, 55 years and older adults who had used mobile devices for tourism. The researchers used the partial least squares approach for this study.

Findings

The results reveal that ease of use has significant effects on extrinsic and intrinsic motivations. The motivations of usefulness and enjoyment significantly affect attachment, which, in turn, influences usage intention. The relationships between ease of use and usefulness, ease of use and enjoyment and enjoyment and attachment were stronger for the high-knowledge group than for the low-knowledge group. The relationship between usefulness and attachment was stronger for the low-knowledge group than for the high-knowledge group.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study provide compelling implications for academics and practitioners in the senior tourism field.

Originality/value

The compelling insight of this study is the development of a research model that combines an emergent construct of attachment as a mediator and knowledge of technology as a moderator.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2019

Matt Aiello and Julian D. Mellor

The NHS needs to adapt as never before to maintain and plan for an integrated and sustainable multi-professional workforce, spanning all health and care sectors. This…

Abstract

Purpose

The NHS needs to adapt as never before to maintain and plan for an integrated and sustainable multi-professional workforce, spanning all health and care sectors. This cannot happen without system leaders embracing workforce transformation at scale and enabling system-wide collaboration and support for multi-professional learning and role development. “By learning together, we learn how to work together”. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The case studies included in this paper provide evidence of the ability of NHS systems to adopt integrated workforce models at scale. The case studies were chosen to demonstrate how system-wide change is possible, but still requires a partnership approach to innovation, strategic workforce planning and commissioner support for new models of care.

Findings

With partnership working between arm’s length bodies, commissioners, educators and workforce planners, the NHS is more than capable of generating a transformed workforce; a workforce able to continue providing safe, effective and joined-up person-centred care.

Research limitations/implications

The focus of this paper is integrated workforce development undertaken by Health Education England from 2017 to the date of drafting. The case studies within this paper relate to England only and are a cross-section chosen by the authors as a representative of Health Education England activity.

Practical implications

The NHS needs to find ways to use the wider health and care workforce to manage an ever-increasing and diverse patient population. Silo working, traditional models of workforce planning and commissioning no longer provide an appropriate response to increasing patient need and complexity.

Social implications

The evolution of the NHS into a joined-up, integrated health and social care workforce is essential to meet the aspirations of national policy and local workforce need – to centre care holistically on the needs of patients and populations and blur the boundaries between primary and secondary care; health and social care; physical and mental health.

Originality/value

This paper contains Health Education England project work and outcomes which are original and as yet unpublished.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2018

Young Hoon Kim, Daniel L. Spears, Elecer E. Vargas-Ortega and Tae-Hee Kim

This paper aims to review the current joint master’s program between two international institutions in the USA and Costa Rica; to identify students’ perceptions and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the current joint master’s program between two international institutions in the USA and Costa Rica; to identify students’ perceptions and experiences with the sustainability house (SH); and to apply these experiences in an effort to improve the practical learning environment for future students.

Design/methodology/approach

In an effort to understand student outcomes provided by the SH, an in-depth literature review on practical learning environments and interview methods were applied. The following open-ended questions were asked in an effort to gather and consolidate student experiences with the SH. What are your experiences in/with SH? Please tell us briefly about your experiences. The language has been adjusted and interviewers answered questions and made clarifications if asked to. Master’s in international sustainable tourism (MIST) program students were selected for this study. Participants’ responses were recorded using the computer-assisted personal interviewing technique.

Findings

The most important characteristic students recognized about the SH is that it “provided us a safe place to fail”. One student described SH as “[…] a safe space where students can gain experiences of learning new processes firsthand without external pressures (e.g., on-the-job training, eventuation, and financial analysis)”. The safety attribute of the SH environment is considered as a comfortable place to learn from other classmates or visitors (mostly volunteers and interns). It is a “real” hospitality and tourism business-learning center, which is a great benefit to the students not only because of its environment but also because of the diversity among student’s educational and professional backgrounds.

Research limitations/implications

The primary limitations of this study need to be addressed. The number of interviews was very limited with one year data which could affect the generalizability of this study. In addition, it was not clearly explained to the student what rubrics and standardized metrics were used during interview process; after interview, students were asked to provide a better way to improve the research outcomes. For further studies, it is strongly recommended to provide the direction to make sure it applies to the conditions that are prevalent in the existing site to be examined.

Practical implications

Both strategies that link the SH to this MIST program have significant merit. Students implementing best practices in the courses have clearly identified the challenges of implementation, but all agree that there is tremendous value in the experiences they have received during their studies. Furthermore, using the SH as an engagement tool has motivated students to consciously interactive and collaborative in a more proactive manner.

Originality/value

This unique experience and operational competency at the SH provides participants with an in-depth understanding of the context and challenges of sustainability but needs to be detailed and promoted more in the future. The SH is facilitating a learning environment among not only students but also faculty and staff. The results clearly indicated that the SH has influenced sustainable behaviors by promoting interactive engagement.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2021

Ann-Marie Streeton, Fleur Kitsell, Nichola Gambles and Rose McCarthy

The improving global health (IGH) programme is a leadership development programme that aims to develop leadership skills and behaviours alongside quality improvement…

Abstract

Purpose

The improving global health (IGH) programme is a leadership development programme that aims to develop leadership skills and behaviours alongside quality improvement methodology in National Health Service (NHS) employees in a global health setting. Through collaboration, experiential learning and mentorship, the programme aims to produce both vertical and horizontal leadership development in its participants. This paper aims to describe the programme and its impact, in terms of leadership development, in a sample of participants.

Design/methodology/approach

Open coding and thematic analysis of leadership development summaries (LDS) completed by 39 returned IGH participants were conducted. LDS are written on completion of the overseas placement; participants reflect on their personal leadership development against the nine dimensions of the NHS Healthcare Leadership Model (2013).

Findings

These IGH programme participants have reported a change in the way they think, behave and see the world. A development in sense of self and experience in developing team members are the two most commonly reported themes. Adaptability, communication, overcoming boundaries, collaborative working, “big picture” thinking and strategic thinking were also identified.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited by the relatively low number of completed LDS. More work is needed to understand the long-term effect of this type of leadership development on the NHS. Other leadership development programmes should consider focussing on vertical and horizontal leadership development.

Originality/value

This more granular understanding of the leadership skills and behaviours developed and how it is the programme’s design that creates it, has not previously been described.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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