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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

Hedda Bird

Abstract

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Strategic HR Review, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2008

Hedda Bird

The purpose of this article is to discuss a process for demonstrating the value of training to help justify training budget spend to the board.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to discuss a process for demonstrating the value of training to help justify training budget spend to the board.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides a discussion on the ROI Academy™ line of sight approach to valuing training. Explains the concept behind the approach, demonstrates how value if calculated and suggests ways of using this data within the organization.

Findings

Provides a method of linking training program outcomes to organizational goals, indicating how this process can be used at a number of levels within the organization.

Practical implications

A practical method that can be used in an learning and development environment.

Originality/value

This paper outlines a practical method of valuing training that can be used to justify learning and development activity.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Hedda Bird

The purpose of this paper is to build understanding of how to engage a highly educated workforce with the benefits of performance management through sharing the lessons…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to build understanding of how to engage a highly educated workforce with the benefits of performance management through sharing the lessons learned from introducing performance reviews (appraisals) into an academic environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a case study of a four-year programme in a UK higher education establishment. The author was closely involved in the last two years of the programme, and completed a detailed evaluation of the programme for the client.

Findings

Performance management creates significant value within a highly educated workforce through bringing together individual capability and expertise to focus on delivering the strategy. Obstacles to success such as routine complaints of “time-wasting” and “pointlessness” can be overcome by wide and deep engagement with employees throughout the design and development of the approach.

Research limitations/implications

This is a single case study; however, the author has worked on many similar programmes with highly educated work forces with very similar results.

Practical implications

The vast majority of staff positively want a high-quality performance review; the practical challenge is to channel this desire into shared ownership and responsibility for the success of performance review in practice.

Originality/value

Literature abounds with analysis of what is wrong with performance review, this paper is a rarer piece in that it develops our understanding of how to set up performance management and review for success.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

The Nationwide’s regional call centers are designed to supplement the services of the society’s two main call centers, in Swindon and Nottingham. These two centers employ…

Abstract

The Nationwide’s regional call centers are designed to supplement the services of the society’s two main call centers, in Swindon and Nottingham. These two centers employ hundreds of staff, trained face to face by instructors working in classrooms. In order to meet the needs of the new regional centers, the Nationwide had to find an efficient way of introducing new staff and managers across the country to basic call‐center skills and to the Nationwide customer culture while maintaining an acceptable level of service.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Abstract

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1971

John O'Riordan

‘WHY MUST EVERYBODY IN IRELAND’, says Sean O'Faolain, in one of his recent flashes of inspiration, ‘live like an express train that starts off for heaven full of beautiful…

Abstract

‘WHY MUST EVERYBODY IN IRELAND’, says Sean O'Faolain, in one of his recent flashes of inspiration, ‘live like an express train that starts off for heaven full of beautiful dreams, and marvellous ambitions and, halfway, Bejasus, you switch off the bloody track down some sideline that brings you to exactly where you began?’ Such highly coloured comment might equally well be applied to the characters and situations we find in the plays of that Dublin genius—the centenary of whose birth we are commemorating this year—John Millington Synge. The writings of both authors, incidentally, are characterized by a rueful, amusing, gently self‐mocking tone about Ireland and the Irish. Both adopt a wider, detached, almost continental view of their country. Synge, in particular, refers to Ireland as the furthermost corner of Western Europe and himself as an Irish European.

Details

Library Review, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1977

Leslie Kane

“Since films attract an audience of millions, the need and appetite for information about them is enormous.” So said Harold Leonard in his introduction to The Film Index

Abstract

“Since films attract an audience of millions, the need and appetite for information about them is enormous.” So said Harold Leonard in his introduction to The Film Index published in 1941. The 1970's has produced more than enough — too much — food to satisfy that appetite. In the past five years the number of reference books, in this context defined as encyclopedias, handbooks, directories, dictionaries, indexes and bibliographies, and the astounding number of volumes on individual directors, complete histories, genre history and analysis, published screenplays, critics' anthologies, biographies of actors and actresses, film theory, film technique and production and nostalgia, that have been published is overwhelming. The problem in film scholarship is not too little material but the senseless duplication of materials that already exist and the embarrassing output of items that are poorly or haphazardly researched, or perhaps should not have been written at all.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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