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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Heather Salt, Simon Callow and Robert Bor

The extent to which an employer has the right to information aboutan employee′s mental and physical health is a much debated topic, offsetby the employee′s right to…

Abstract

The extent to which an employer has the right to information about an employee′s mental and physical health is a much debated topic, offset by the employee′s right to privacy. Indeed, privacy is often confused with confidentiality and secrecy. Identifies some of the dilemmas facing management, personnel, and occupational health departments about confidential health matters in relation to recruitment, retention and dismissal of employees believed or known to have physical or mental health problems. Gives a case example of an employee who is infected with the virus which causes AIDS, to highlight confidentiality issues. Makes recommendations for confidentiality policy, giving guidelines for management on information relating to employees′ mental and physical health.

Details

Employee Councelling Today, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-8217

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Heather K. Salt and Simon Callow

AIDS is a relatively new disease associated with stigma and death.In the UK, mass media AIDS campaigns have increased public knowledgeabout this disease but there is still…

Abstract

AIDS is a relatively new disease associated with stigma and death. In the UK, mass media AIDS campaigns have increased public knowledge about this disease but there is still misinformation and fear about how it is spread and how it affects people. This is the basis for fear of discrimination at work towards people suspected or known to be infected with HIV, the virus which causes AIDS. How might HIV infection or AIDS affect the workforce and what can be done to promote the physical and mental wellbeing of employees? How can employees be helped to reduce their risk of contracting this disease? Discusses ideas for personnel, management and occupational health services. Addresses AIDS counselling issues at work and provides a framework for organizational assessment, counselling and training, intervention and evaluation. This is in conjunction with policy development. Describes the role of the external consultant to provide objective confidential and expert advice.

Details

Employee Councelling Today, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-8217

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Joanna Gibson, Gillian Armstrong and Heather McIlveen

Salt is one of the most valuable substances available to man, with a definitive role in the human body and in food production. However, the continued use or indeed misuse…

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Abstract

Salt is one of the most valuable substances available to man, with a definitive role in the human body and in food production. However, the continued use or indeed misuse of salt has led to adverse effects on health. The increasing consumption of convenience foods has contributed greatly to a high salt intake. Highly processed, convenience foods are known to contain large quantities of salt to optimise storage stability and flavour acceptability. Current high salt intakes have therefore been attributed to processed foods, accounting for 75‐85 per cent of total salt intake. Such findings and associated health implications have prompted a call from health professionals and food researchers to reduce salt intake. Effective salt reduction, however, can only be achieved with the co‐operation and commitment of the food industry in the development of lower‐salt processed foods.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Douglas W. Murray, Heather Hartwell, Charles H. Feldman and Meena Mahadevan

Public health policy has long called for significant reductions in salt intake. To date most research has been confined to processed foods. This approach fails to include…

405

Abstract

Purpose

Public health policy has long called for significant reductions in salt intake. To date most research has been confined to processed foods. This approach fails to include the foodservice industry and its impact on population health. The purpose of this paper is to understand perceptions of what responsibility, if any, these professionals felt they had within the public health agenda. International comparisons were made to assess whether previous reductions of salt intake among UK adults was attributable to groundswell attitudinal changes at the chef/manager level, which US counterparts may not have embraced.

Design/methodology/approach

This study took the qualitative approach of phenomenology as the research strategy to explore prevailing perceptions of the role and responsibility of food service regarding salt intake. Chefs and managers who deal directly with consumers were given in-depth semi-structured interviews designed to reveal the underlying themes that inform the participant’s perceptions of added salt.

Findings

Major findings from both the USA and UK indicate that ground-level chef/managers do not feel a social responsibility to limit public salt consumption. Chef/managers of both countries exhibited little nutritional understanding of the health impacts of salt intake and strong reluctance to make any reductions in salt use in their daily operations. The participants cite a lack of consumer interest and the fear that any salt adjustment would change the food’s sensory acceptability putting them at a competitive disadvantage.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge this is the first study to examine professional foodservice personnel’s perceptions and knowledge of salt intake and the public health perspective.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2021

Heather C. Melton

Sexual assault continues to be a major criminal problem. Sexual assault kits (SAK) are one way to preserve evidence to use to pursue justice in sexual assault cases. In…

Abstract

Purpose

Sexual assault continues to be a major criminal problem. Sexual assault kits (SAK) are one way to preserve evidence to use to pursue justice in sexual assault cases. In recent years, it has become clear that very often these SAKs are never sent to the crime lab to be processed. In an effort to deal with these unsubmitted kits and to research their impact, the Bureau of Justice Assistance funded various grants, known as the Sexual Assault Kit Initiative (SAKI) nationwide to create multidisciplinary teams to both improve the process and response to sexual assault and to provide research on this issue. This paper aims to explore a process created by one of the multidisciplinary teams in one SAKI site – the case review. Ultimately, the goal is to explore how different participants in the case review process perceive and experience the case review and provide implications of these findings.

Design/methodology/approach

Using surveys of case review participants, participant observation and key stakeholder interviews findings indicate that case reviews are beneficial in terms of training, collaboration and overall response to sexual assault.

Findings

Using all methods, the participants of case reviews found them beneficial. Both new information was gleaned from almost every case review and decisions on particular cases were potentially changed, particularly among the key stakeholders with the ability to impact decisions in sexual assault cases – law enforcement and prosecutors. Issues were raised through the case review process that might not have been without this process. Thus, case reviews have the potential to affect policy and practice and improve future reporting, investigations and prosecutions of sexual assault cases.

Practical implications

Multidisciplinary responses to sexual assault cases, specifically the case review process, are beneficial. Issues for training, opportunities for collaboration and general issues for a particular jurisdiction are all potentially raised during a case review. The case reviews need to be organized, preparation work completed and properly facilitated to be effective. Participants in the case review process themselves perceive case reviews to be beneficial.

Originality/value

This paper presents findings from one of the SAKI sites. A specific process, the case review process, that was developed and implemented at this site was explored. The findings on this process have implications for both practice and policy.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 July 2019

Heather Melton

The family justice center (FJC) model centralizes social and legal services available to intimate partner abuse (IPA) victims in order to facilitate their help-seeking and…

Abstract

Purpose

The family justice center (FJC) model centralizes social and legal services available to intimate partner abuse (IPA) victims in order to facilitate their help-seeking and improve their experiences and the response to IPA. Little, yet promising, research has highlighted the effectiveness of this model. The purpose of this paper is to explore experiences of victims of IPA at one FJC.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 24 respondents who utilized a FJC in a western county in the USA were interviewed using a survey that included both descriptive quantitative and qualitative questions. Descriptive analysis was performed on the quantitative portion and content analysis on the qualitative portion.

Findings

Most of the respondents used the FJC multiple times and for multiple services. Most were referred by a shelter or a hotline. The most common services used were housing services, followed by counseling. Overall, these respondents felt supported by FJC staff and were satisfied. However, some of the respondents who did indicate satisfaction in the quantitative portion of the survey expressed concerns in the qualitative portion.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited by a small sample size; however, it has implications for recruitment, outreach and training as well as methodological implications for how FJCs should be evaluated.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the scant literature on FJCs and the FJC model.

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

David La Rooy, Sonja P Brubacher, Anu Aromäki-Stratos, Mireille Cyr, Irit Hershkowitz, Julia Korkman, Trond Myklebust, Makiko Naka, Carlos E. Peixoto, Kim P Roberts, Heather Stewart and Michael E Lamb

The purpose of this paper is to review an evidence-based tool for training child forensic interviewers called the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review an evidence-based tool for training child forensic interviewers called the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Protocol (NICHD Protocol), with a specific focus on how the Protocol is being adapted in various countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors include international contributions from experienced trainers, practitioners, and scientists, who are already using the Protocol or whose national or regional procedures have been directly influenced by the NICHD Protocol research (Canada, Finland, Israel, Japan, Korea, Norway, Portugal, Scotland, and USA). Throughout the review, these experts comment on: how and when the Protocol was adopted in their country; who uses it; training procedures; challenges to implementation and translation; and other pertinent aspects. The authors aim to further promote good interviewing practice by sharing the experiences of these international experts.

Findings

The NICHD Protocol can be easily incorporated into existing training programs worldwide and is available for free. It was originally developed in English and Hebrew and is available in several other languages.

Originality/value

This paper reviews an evidence-based tool for training child forensic interviewers called the NICHD Protocol. It has been extensively studied and reviewed over the past 20 years. This paper is unique in that it brings together practitioners who are actually responsible for training forensic interviewers and conducting forensic interviews from all around the world.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1973

The new authorities created by this Act, probably the most important local government measure of the century, will be voted into existence during 1973 and commence…

Abstract

The new authorities created by this Act, probably the most important local government measure of the century, will be voted into existence during 1973 and commence functioning on 1st April 1974. Their responsibilities and the problems facing them are in many ways quite different and of greater complexity than those with which existing councils have had to cope. In its passage through the Lords, a number of amendments were made to the Act, but in the main, it is a scheme of reorganization originally produced after years of discussion and long sessions in the Commons. Local government reorganization in Scotland takes place one year later and for Northern Ireland, we must continue to wait and pray for a return of sanity.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 75 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1927

The Departmental Committee appointed in June, 1924, to inquire into the question as to whether and to what extent the practice of treating flour with chemical substances…

Abstract

The Departmental Committee appointed in June, 1924, to inquire into the question as to whether and to what extent the practice of treating flour with chemical substances is objectionable on grounds of health and whether it is desirable that the practice should be prohibited or restricted, have issued their report. The Committee observe :—

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2022

Heather J. Swenddal, Mathews Nkhoma and Sarah Joy Gumbley

The quality and market viability of international branch campuses (IBCs) depend upon their integration with university headquarters. Recent trends toward localizing…

Abstract

Purpose

The quality and market viability of international branch campuses (IBCs) depend upon their integration with university headquarters. Recent trends toward localizing branch-campus hiring have raised questions about the extent to which non-parent-campus lecturers will support global integration pursuits. This paper aims to examine IBC lecturers’ orientations towards global integration, exploring how they identify themselves and their campuses as part of their wider universities.

Design/methodology/approach

Employing constructivist grounded theory methodology, 37 lecturers and leaders at four Australian branch campuses in Southeast Asia were interviewed, engaging them in semi-structured discussions of their identities and experiences. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using NVivo in an iterative process of theory development.

Findings

Branch-campus lecturers interviewed generally construct their individual and campus identities as separate from their wider universities. Barriers to branch campuses’ global integration include low organizational identification of lecturers, challenges in their relationships with headquarters colleagues and perceptions of cross-campus disparities in resources and students. Branch campuses’ organizationally separate identities are enacted in practice, fueling a self-reinforcing “Othering Loop” that could undermine these campuses’ quality and viability.

Originality/value

This research is the first emic exploration of locally-hired branch-campus lecturers’ views toward global integration. These findings provide an important corrective to the existing literature on this topic, challenging assumptions that localizing branch-campus hiring is the primary risk to integration. Multiple points of potential managerial intervention were identified, highlighting opportunities for university leaders to address contextual barriers and improve international branch campuses’ global integration while continuing current trends toward localized hiring.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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