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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

Judy Curson and Heather Parnell

Explores the challenges faced in leading organizations through times of uncertainty and how a positive approach can result in expansion.

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Abstract

Purpose

Explores the challenges faced in leading organizations through times of uncertainty and how a positive approach can result in expansion.

Design/methodology/approach

Examines how a positive and open approach to a lengthy period of uncertainty preceding takeover resulted in significant growth and expansion and lower‐than‐expected staff turnover. Considers the significance of stable leadership, the importance of looking after and continuing to develop staff, and how expanding the horizons of both the organization and staff can grow the business. Looks at the importance of open and constant communication at all levels, and the value of team‐building activities in maintaining staff morale.

Findings

Reveals that staff value honesty and transparency in times of uncertainty and respond positively to leadership stability and a strong lead to continue to look forward and expand both the business and their personal horizons through taking on new and exciting challenges.

Practical implications

Shows how an active response to uncertainty and change can provide the impetus for business expansion and continued staff development at a time when these would more naturally be expected to remain static or contract.

Social implications

Emphasizes that, in times of difficulty or uncertainty, it is essential that staff continue to feel valued as individuals and team members.

Originality/value

Argues strongly that leaders must rise to the challenge when guiding an organization through uncertain times, resisting the temptation to “sit out the storm.”

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2010

Judy Curson and Tom Skidmore

The purpose of this paper is to explore the challenges faced by a small, specialized NHS organization in recruiting and retaining a high quality workforce in a highly…

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1719

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the challenges faced by a small, specialized NHS organization in recruiting and retaining a high quality workforce in a highly competitive market.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper focuses on four main areas: recruitment, employee development, office environment, and management style.

Findings

The conclusion is that against the odds a public sector organization can attract and retain a high quality workforce in a highly competitive market.

Originality/value

An innovative and flexible approach to recruiting and managing your staff can achieve remarkable results.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Book part
Publication date: 20 September 2021

Beth G. Clarkson, Ali Bowes, Lucy Lomax and Jessica Piasecki

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic in early 2020 prompted widespread global lockdowns as the world looked to contain and reduce the impact of the virus, including a pause…

Abstract

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic in early 2020 prompted widespread global lockdowns as the world looked to contain and reduce the impact of the virus, including a pause on most sporting competitions (Parnell et al., 2020). COVID-19 has greatly affected the world, exposing stark inequalities, especially across gendered lines, in areas of society such as the labour market, domestic responsibility and economic hardship (Alon et al., 2020). Sport is a crucial, interwoven aspect of society and like wider societal trends, elite women's sport has been adversely affected by the pandemic, facing an existential threat (Bowes et al., 2020; Clarkson et al., 2020; Rowe, 2020). The aim of this chapter is to provide an overview of how the pandemic is negatively impacting a wide variety of elite women's sports. Specifically, we cover sports where women have traditionally existed on the margins of the sport and could be considered as male-dominated labour industries. Centring primarily on the United Kingdom, we present a brief chronology of the impact of the crisis on elite women's sport, across football, rugby, cricket and golf – in many ways different from the men's versions – spanning the eight months since the start of the pandemic in March 2020 until the time of writing in November 2020. Throughout, the chapter utilises qualitative data from elite sportswomen encouraged to share their experiences during the pandemic (see Bowes et al., 2020). Subsequently, this chapter concludes with a summary of the challenges for women operating in (semi-)professional sports environments.

Details

The Professionalisation of Women’s Sport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-196-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Carlos Balsas

The Capitol Mall is a very complex urban area adjacent to downtown Phoenix, where Governmental buildings exist side by side with a historic residential neighborhood…

Abstract

The Capitol Mall is a very complex urban area adjacent to downtown Phoenix, where Governmental buildings exist side by side with a historic residential neighborhood, warehouse buildings, an under-construction human services campus, vacant lots, and many homeless people on the streets. This area has been 'forgotten' in recent efforts to revitalize downtown Phoenix. The Capitol Mall project involved two studios - Architecture and Planning - conducted simultaneously during spring 2005. The planning studio was intended to develop a revitalization plan and the architecture studio was charged with developing specific programs and projects of urban design and architecture.

The purpose of this paper is threefold: 1) to introduce our studios as examples of community embeddedness, 2) to discuss our pedagogical approaches and the project's outcomes, and 3) to present a set of lessons learned that can be valuable to others teaching similar joint studio arrangements. In brief the five lessons are: a) joint studios can have different approaches to reality, b) interdisciplinary studios can benefit from different methodologies and outcomes, c) planning and architecture studios use classroom resources differently, d) joint studios display creativity in different ways, 5) interdisciplinary studios can lead to joint discovery and re-enforcement of learning experiences.

Details

Open House International, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Angely Boske

This narrative describes the author’s experience as an artist, author, and a humanitarian. She uses pictures, art, and collage to make connections between her past…

Abstract

This narrative describes the author’s experience as an artist, author, and a humanitarian. She uses pictures, art, and collage to make connections between her past, present, and future.

Details

Living the Work: Promoting Social Justice and Equity Work in Schools around the World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-127-5

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2018

Heather Skinner

Anecdotal evidence suggests that in times of economic constraints particularly in countries such as Greece that have long been stereotyped as corrupt, business practices…

Abstract

Purpose

Anecdotal evidence suggests that in times of economic constraints particularly in countries such as Greece that have long been stereotyped as corrupt, business practices amongst small- and medium-sized organisations that make up the majority of these nations’ tourism operators may become less than ethical or legal. The purpose of this paper is to explore these issues empirically in order to understand the impact of both cultural values and economic constraints on tourism businesses’ practices.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory case study using mixed methods has been adopted. Quantitative data were gathered from tourism business owners, managers and employees via questionnaires to establish the nature and scope of various unethical, illegal or immoral practices. Qualitative data were gathered to explore the ways these issues are considered and enacted.

Findings

Results show that there are many unethical and illegal practices that have been witnessed first-hand. Businesses’ attempts at acting in an ethical and socially responsible manner tend to be affected by not only cultural issues, but also economic constraints, yet there remains a desire to act in a way that does not impact negatively on tourists or on the local society and environment.

Originality/value

This research fills a gap in the literature relating to the ethical stance and practices of tourism entrepreneurs. It also presents an original conceptualisation of these issues in light of their location within the extant literature on ethics, corporate social responsibility and both sustainable and responsible tourism.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1932

AFTER more than thirty‐three years THE LIBRARY WORLD appears in a new and, we hope our readers will agree, more attractive form. In making such a change the oldest of the…

Abstract

AFTER more than thirty‐three years THE LIBRARY WORLD appears in a new and, we hope our readers will agree, more attractive form. In making such a change the oldest of the independent British library journals is only following the precedent of practically all its contemporaries. The new age is impatient with long‐standing patterns in typography and in page sizes, and all crafts progress by such experiments as we are making. Our new form lends itself better than the old to illustration; we have selected a paper designed for that purpose, and illustrated articles will therefore be a feature of our issues. We shall continue as in the past to urge progress in every department of the library field by the admission of any matter which seems to have living interest for the body of librarians.

Details

New Library World, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1976

John O'Riordan

IT WOULD NOT BE beyond the powers of exaggeration to claim that James Joyce is one of the greatest writers of the twentieth century. But it would be doubly…

Abstract

IT WOULD NOT BE beyond the powers of exaggeration to claim that James Joyce is one of the greatest writers of the twentieth century. But it would be doubly difficult—difficult, even, for a star‐spangled Dubliner whose lips had been royally touched—to substantiate such a claim within the limits of a single sentence. It is true Joyce wrote a great number of pages, but he did not write a great number of books. He was a great humorist in the true Irish tradition: a savage satirist in the manner of Swift (though subtler in his technique) and a natural parodist and punster. He could perform miracles with words, and just as Wilde was a master of the epigram, so Joyce achieved endless subtleties and successes with the pun.

Details

Library Review, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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