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1 – 10 of 166
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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2020

Julian Ashton and Heather Edwards

315

Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Article
Publication date: 11 August 2020

Heather Edwards

This paper aims to present findings of a project implementing training to enable care staff to create simple audio-biographical resources with older tenants and residents in…

160

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present findings of a project implementing training to enable care staff to create simple audio-biographical resources with older tenants and residents in sheltered housing and care homes.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on written evaluations by participants of training workshops delivered to 136 care home staff within 28 care homes of the NorseCare group in Norfolk, UK and of their experience after three months in the workplace.

Findings

The evaluations showed a high degree of satisfaction with training and impact of the intervention. Successful implementation of training in the workplace depended on factors of time and leadership within individual homes and housing schemes.

Originality/value

Making innovative personal information documents valued carers’ unique understanding of residents and tenants. This creative co-production may have benefits in personalising and enriching the experience of care for both staff and residents.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2024

Jurgen Grotz, Lindsay Armstrong, Heather Edwards, Aileen Jones, Michael Locke, Laurel Smith, Ewen Speed and Linda Birt

This study aims to critically examine the effects of COVID-19 social discourses and policy decisions specifically on older adult volunteers in the UK, comparing the responses and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to critically examine the effects of COVID-19 social discourses and policy decisions specifically on older adult volunteers in the UK, comparing the responses and their effects in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, providing perspectives on effects of policy changes designed to reduce risk of infection as a result of COVID-19, specifically on volunteer involvement of and for older adults, and understand, from the perspectives of volunteer managers, how COVID-19 restrictions had impacted older people’s volunteering and situating this within statutory public health policies.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a critical discourse approach to explore, compare and contrast accounts of volunteering of and for older people in policy, and then compare the discourses within policy documents with the discourses in personal accounts of volunteering in health and social care settings in the four nations of the UK. This paper is co-produced in collaboration with co-authors who have direct experience with volunteer involvement responses and their impact on older people.

Findings

The prevailing overall policy approach during the pandemic was that risk of morbidity and mortality to older people was too high to permit them to participate in volunteering activities. Disenfranchising of older people, as exemplified in volunteer involvement, was remarkably uniform across the four nations of the UK. However, the authors find that despite, rather than because of policy changes, older volunteers, as part of, or with the help of, volunteer involving organisations, are taking time to think and to reconsider their involvement and are renewing their volunteer involvement with associated health benefits.

Research limitations/implications

Working with participants as co-authors helps to ensure the credibility of results in that there was agreement in the themes identified and the conclusions. A limitation of this study lies in the sampling method, as a convenience sample was used and there is only representation from one organisation in each of the four nations.

Originality/value

The paper combines existing knowledge about volunteer involvement of and for older adults.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 April 2020

Martina Topić, Maria Joäo Cunha, Amelia Reigstad, Alenka Jelen-Sanchez and Ángeles Moreno

This paper aims to analyse the current literature on women in public relations to establish trends and areas of inquiry in the literature and identify research gaps for future…

2048

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse the current literature on women in public relations to establish trends and areas of inquiry in the literature and identify research gaps for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 223 articles have been empirically analysed using thematic analysis to identify trends in the existing literature. The data has been coded and analysed per decade (1982–1989, 1990–1999, 2000–2009, 2010–2019). The articles have been identified by searching major journals in the field of public relations and communications, as well as snowballing from identified articles.

Findings

The results show that the majority of academic articles have been produced by using lived experiences of women working in the public relations industry and thus reflect the professional situation of female public relations employees. The results show that the position of women has reached a full circle in four decades of research and returned to the discriminatory work environment. Finally, the results show that a liberal feminist perspective has an advantage in the literature since the majority of works have been produced in the United States; however, there is an increase in authors calling for the use of socialist and radical feminism.

Originality/value

The paper provides a comprehensive literature review of works published in the field. The paper takes an empirical approach to the analysis rather than the descriptive one, which helped in identifying major trends in the research and identified a research gap for future inquiries.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 January 2013

7

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Sheila Cannell and Fred Guy

This paper discusses cross‐sectoral collaboration in procuring and implementing a new library management system. After a historical review of collaboration in this area in the UK…

Abstract

This paper discusses cross‐sectoral collaboration in procuring and implementing a new library management system. After a historical review of collaboration in this area in the UK and other countries, it focuses on the joint purchase of the Voyager system (supplied by Endeavor Information Systems Inc.) by Edinburgh University and the National Library of Scotland. The differing missions and automation histories of the two institutions are discussed, followed by a practical summary of the procurement and implementation processes. The theoretical and practical advantages and disadvantages of this form of collaborative approach between academic and government organisations are described.

Details

Program, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Colin Darch, Joan Rapp and Peter G. Underwood

Academic library consortia in South Africa are indeed beasts whose time has come at last, although whether they constitute a second coming for our profession or our end‐users…

1757

Abstract

Academic library consortia in South Africa are indeed beasts whose time has come at last, although whether they constitute a second coming for our profession or our end‐users remains to be seen. They can probably be described as a group of diverse entities, rough and as‐yet unsure of their destination. In this descriptive text, we attempt to outline, for a mainly North American audience, the specifics which distinguish the developing consortia in a newly democratic and newly globalised South Africa from those in other more economically advantaged parts of the world. It remains to be seen whether the center will in fact hold. Letting go reluctantly of this literary conceit, for the time being at least, we describe the all‐important social and political background in which our institutions must operate, moving on to an analysis of the impulse to cooperate and the obstacles that have emerged to stifle that impulse. In our conclusion we risk some predictions about where academic library consortia may be headed in our part of the world.

Details

Library Consortium Management: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-2760

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Colin Darch and Peter G. Underwood

Information and communication technology (ICT) development in South African libraries cannot be understood outside the context of the post‐apartheid period. The society consists…

1493

Abstract

Information and communication technology (ICT) development in South African libraries cannot be understood outside the context of the post‐apartheid period. The society consists of a technologically sophisticated sector, and an underdeveloped Third World sector. Higher education and other libraries attempt to straddle this divide. Government policy emphasises the importance of connectivity in redressing inequality. Policy is a contested area, and investigations have been conducted with little concrete result. The main development has been the emergence of academic library consortia, which have succeeded in attracting funding from the USA and other foundations. But without information literacy, these developments will have little impact. There are grounds for techno‐pessimism, as digital information resources are seen by advanced countries as commodities for which payment must be made, even if knowledge production originally took place in the South.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1988

Kenneth Mullen

At the present time there is a general dissatisfaction among both theoreticians and practitioners with the disease model of alcoholism. It is often felt that it has served its…

Abstract

At the present time there is a general dissatisfaction among both theoreticians and practitioners with the disease model of alcoholism. It is often felt that it has served its usefulness. This can be witnessed in the literature in the increased questioning of the central components of the alcohol addiction model. Such dissatisfaction is not new but the present unease has resulted in the creation of new models of problem drinking. New theories of alcoholism have been expressly fashioned to replace outmoded ideas.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 26 August 2022

Heather Douglas and Robin Fitzgerald

Non-fatal strangulation (NFS) is a dangerous form of domestic violence. We need to understand and address the challenges of prosecuting offences of NFS to help ensure the safety…

Abstract

Non-fatal strangulation (NFS) is a dangerous form of domestic violence. We need to understand and address the challenges of prosecuting offences of NFS to help ensure the safety of women and children. This policy brief draws on an examination of prosecution case files involving NFS. It identifies the key challenges and makes recommendations for responding to them.

Details

Emerald Open Research, vol. 1 no. 13
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-3952

Keywords

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