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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Leslie M. Klevay

The origins of ischaemic heart disease are obscure. The articlediscusses the influence of environment, heredity and diet (especiallyfor consumption). It is then proposed…

Abstract

The origins of ischaemic heart disease are obscure. The article discusses the influence of environment, heredity and diet (especially for consumption). It is then proposed that dietary deficiencies of copper may be a factor that enhances risk of the disease. The evidence for this is discussed.

Details

Environmental Management and Health, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

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Book part
Publication date: 29 July 2009

Sally Lindsay

There is growing evidence to suggest that childhood deprivation is linked to social inequalities and has important consequences for health in later life. Past studies tend…

Abstract

There is growing evidence to suggest that childhood deprivation is linked to social inequalities and has important consequences for health in later life. Past studies tend to focus on the influence of cumulative deprivation on the risk of developing a particular disease. This study adds to the literature by exploring how deprivation in childhood may be linked to how people (who already have a disease) self-manage their condition in later life. Questionnaires and focus groups were analysed to explore this relationship (n=91) among coronary heart disease patients living in a deprived urban area of Northern England. The results suggest that childhood deprivation may influence health behaviours and lifestyle in later life especially with regard to diet, health locus of control and doctor visits.

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Social Sources of Disparities in Health and Health Care and Linkages to Policy, Population Concerns and Providers of Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-835-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

James H. Jenkins

African American men and women suffer from health problems such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, AIDS, sickle cell anemia, and various forms of cancer…

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Abstract

African American men and women suffer from health problems such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, AIDS, sickle cell anemia, and various forms of cancer, often at a higher rate than the rest of the population. There is a need for information about these and other health problems affecting this particular community. This annotated bibliography includes recent articles, books, Internet resources, and Web sites. The audience for this essay includes the layperson, health‐care professionals, and information specialists who wish to provide information to patrons on these important health issues.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 July 2021

Koki Hirata, Kunichika Matsumoto, Ryo Onishi and Tomonori Hasegawa

The purpose of this article is to clarify the social burden of Japan’s three major diseases including Long-term Care (LTC) burden.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to clarify the social burden of Japan’s three major diseases including Long-term Care (LTC) burden.

Design/methodology/approach

A modification of the Cost of Illness (COI)—the Comprehensive-COI (C-COI) was utilized to estimate three major diseases: cancer, heart disease, and cerebrovascular diseases (CVD). The C-COI consists of five parts: medical direct cost, morbidity cost, mortality cost, formal LTC cost and informal LTC cost. The latter was calculated by two approaches: opportunity cost approach (OC) and replacement approach (RA), which assumed that informal caregivers were substituted by paid caregivers.

Findings

The C-COI of cancer, heart disease and CVD in 2017 amounted to 10.5 trillion JPY, 5.2 trillion JPY, and 6.7 trillion JPY, respectively (110 JPY= 1 US$). The mortality cost was preponderant for cancer (61 percent) and heart disease (47.9 percent); while the informal LTC cost was preponderant for CVD (27.5 percent). The informal LTC cost of the CVD in OC amounted to 1.8 trillion JPY; while the RA amounted to 3.0 trillion JPY.

Social implications

The LTC burden accounted for a significant proportion of the social burden of chronic diseases. The informal care was maintained by unsustainable structures such as the elderly providing care for the elderly. This result can affect health policy decisions.

Originality/value

The C-COI is more appropriate for estimating the social burden of chronic diseases including the LTC burden and can be calculated using governmental statistics.

Details

Public Administration and Policy, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1727-2645

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Arnold Barfield

The question is: should women be encouraged to reduce dietary fats– especially saturated fats – as a measure to preventcardiovascular disease (i.e. heart disease plus…

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516

Abstract

The question is: should women be encouraged to reduce dietary fats – especially saturated fats – as a measure to prevent cardiovascular disease (i.e. heart disease plus stroke)? Presents evidence to support the conclusion that enhanced levels of blood cholesterol do not indicate enhanced risk of cardiovascular disease in women. Similar evidence supports the conclusion that enhanced blood cholesterol levels do not indicate enhanced risk of all‐cause death, i.e. they do not indicate reduced life expectancy. Hence there is no rational basis for adopting a diet designed to reduce cholesterol, e.g. one based on reduced consumption of saturated fat. These conclusions illustrate the undesirability of pursuing measures to reduce a single disease – in this case coronary heart disease – in isolation from consideration of risk relations for other ailments and for overall health.

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 95 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Shahnaz Aziz, Karl Wuensch and Saame Raza Shaikh

The purpose of this paper is to examine if facets of workaholism are associated with a family history of metabolic diseases.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine if facets of workaholism are associated with a family history of metabolic diseases.

Design/methodology/approach

Data on workaholism and family history of health issues were collected, through administration of an online survey, from 194 employees.

Findings

Workaholism significantly related to a family history of metabolic diseases.

Research limitations/implications

Future researchers should collect objective disease data, examine work-related moderators as well as potential mediators, and implement longitudinal designs with much larger samples. That said, the data reveal a correlation between workaholism and family history of metabolic disease.

Practical implications

The results provide valuable information to help promote a healthy workforce and to improve employees’ health by reducing workaholic tendencies. They could also help to minimize health-related costs associated with metabolic diseases that could develop in parallel with workaholism, as well as costs in terms of a loss in productivity due absenteeism.

Originality/value

It is, the authors believe, the first study to investigate the relationship between facets of workaholism and family history of health issues that have often been associated with metabolic diseases.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2012

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888

Abstract

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International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Book part
Publication date: 21 October 2008

Sally Lindsay

Although much is known about inequalities in the prevalence of CHD, less is known about the barriers experienced in self-managing it. Questionnaires, focus groups, and…

Abstract

Although much is known about inequalities in the prevalence of CHD, less is known about the barriers experienced in self-managing it. Questionnaires, focus groups, and Internet forums were analyzed to explore obstacles in self-managing CHD. Most people found it difficult and costly to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Gender inequalities included women being more likely to live on their own and with a lower income. Marital status was an issue as several were either caring for an ill spouse or were coping with their recent death. Socio-demographic factors played a key role in influencing people's ability to manage their CHD.

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Care for Major Health Problems and Population Health Concerns: Impacts on Patients, Providers and Policy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-160-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1975

A.S. Truswell

Coronary heart disease, which is sometimes called ischaemic heart disease, is the major cause of death in the United Kingdom. Much more is known, and even more talked…

Abstract

Coronary heart disease, which is sometimes called ischaemic heart disease, is the major cause of death in the United Kingdom. Much more is known, and even more talked about, the relationship between coronary heart disease (CHD) and diet than any other type of medical disorders except for the deficiency diseases.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 75 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Verner Wheelock

Discusses the pros and cons of a healthy eating programme and looksat ways of avoiding nutritional deficiencies, which are often related toareas of residence or similar…

Abstract

Discusses the pros and cons of a healthy eating programme and looks at ways of avoiding nutritional deficiencies, which are often related to areas of residence or similar reasons. Looks at ways of avoiding chronic heart disease (CHD) and cancer‐related illnesses through knowledge and diet. Food businesses by implication are involved in this. Discusses results of various surveys, in particular one by the American Cancer Society involving 750,000 men and women. Shows that statistics come down fully on the person of average (sic) weight living a longer, fuller life than the overweight one. Concludes that people who are overweight, who do little or no exercise and eat sugar and fat in unsafe quantities may shorten their lives by as much as 50 per cent. Increasing fibre intake, decreasing fat, will therefore lessen the risk of heart and related illness (as in Scotland) and prolong life, as occurs in people of the Greek, Italian, some Spanish and French areas.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 94 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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