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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Bianca Dos Santos and Vanessa Beavan

The distress that is associated with auditory hallucinations, or voices, is well documented. However, increasingly research into this phenomenon is also capturing those…

Abstract

Purpose

The distress that is associated with auditory hallucinations, or voices, is well documented. However, increasingly research into this phenomenon is also capturing those who cope with their voices, and live meaningful lives. Peer support is a popular and useful way in which to learn to manage the distress for voice-hearers. The Hearing Voices Network (HVN) acts as an umbrella organisation for which research, training and peer support groups exist (www.intervoiceonline.org). Despite the growing amount of peer support groups established, there is to date no published material on these groups. The purpose of this paper is to discuss these issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study used Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis to explore the experiences of four informants across three New South Wales HVN groups.

Findings

Results suggest that the social connections, value of sharing and desire for more group members are all important within the group. Beyond the group, informants described the increased willingness to talk to others about their voice experiences, improvements in sense of self and a positive change in their relationship with their voices.

Originality/value

The study demonstrates the importance of peer participation in the mental health workforce and the provision of safe spaces for those with lived experience to share and learn from each other in meaningful ways. Research implications include the need for further research measuring outcomes on a larger scale for these support groups.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Peter Bullimore and Jerome Carson

This paper seeks to offer a profile of Peter Bullimore, one of the most dynamic lived experience speakers and trainers in the mental health world.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to offer a profile of Peter Bullimore, one of the most dynamic lived experience speakers and trainers in the mental health world.

Design/methodology/approach

A profile of Peter is built up through an in‐depth interview by psychologist Jerome Carson. Areas covered include: his experience of hearing voices; his work in Australia and New Zealand; stigma; recovery; inspiring individuals in mental health; his personal illness and medication; the media; and changes and challenges.

Findings

Peter tells us that hearing voices are signs of a problem not an illness, and are often linked to trauma. He feels British work on recovery is in advance of that in Australia and New Zealand. He sees a day when it will no longer be necessary to use the term schizophrenia. Instead of recovery people should be thinking of discovery.

Originality/value

For too long the only voices that have been heard in the mental health field have been the professional voices. Peter's is one of many new inspirational voices to have emerged from the developing service user movement.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2012

Lisa Blackman

Purpose – To explore an ethics of entanglement in the context of mental health and psychosocial research.Design/methodology/approach – To bring together debates within…

Abstract

Purpose – To explore an ethics of entanglement in the context of mental health and psychosocial research.

Design/methodology/approach – To bring together debates within body and affect studies, and specifically the concepts of mediated perception and the performativity of experimentation. My specific focus will be on voice hearing and research that I have conducted with voice hearers, both within and to the margins of the Hearing Voices Network (see Blackman, 2001, 2007).

Findings – The antecedents for a performative approach to experimentation and an ethics of entanglement can be found within a nineteenth-century subliminal archive (Blackman, 2012).

Originality/value – These conceptual links allow the researcher to consider the technologies that might allow them to ‘listen to voices’ and introduce the non-human into our conceptions of listening and interpreting. This directs our attention to those agencies and actors who create the possibility of listening and learning beyond the boundaries of a humanist research subject.

Details

Ethics in Social Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-878-6

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Sue Patterson, Nicole Goulter and Tim Weaver

The purpose of this paper is to examine the experience and impact of targeted training involving simulation of auditory hallucinations on attitudes and practice of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the experience and impact of targeted training involving simulation of auditory hallucinations on attitudes and practice of professionals working with people with mental illness.

Design/methodology/approach

Pragmatic mixed-method study. Data were collected from 83 professionals who completed training using cross-sectional survey and focus groups. Descriptive, comparative and thematic analyses were performed.

Findings

Training was associated with changes in thinking and attitude related to working with people who hear voices. Participants, who commonly found the simulation confronting, drew on the experience to deepen appreciation of coping with voices that are distressing and develop a new frame of reference for practice. They positioned themselves differently and described adopting a range of practices consistent with the recovery approach. Environmental constraints variously impacted on capacity to enact these practices.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in one centre using a bespoke survey instrument with a sample intrinsically motivated to complete training. Hence, caution should be exercised with regard to generalisability. However, findings are consistent with the limited published literature and the mixed-method approach provided a comprehensive understanding.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrated that the training employed can support development of patient centred, recovery-oriented practices. These are likely essential to optimising patient and service outcomes. Further research is needed to examine the impact of training on a broader cross section of professionals and the outcomes for patients.

Originality/value

The paper provides important new insights regarding the mechanisms by which training can contribute to development of patient-centred care.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Ingrid Barker and Edward Peck

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Erica Mclnnis, William Sellwood and Clair Jones

This study reports a recovery‐themed cognitive behavioural educational group for clients suffering from chronic positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia, on a low…

Abstract

This study reports a recovery‐themed cognitive behavioural educational group for clients suffering from chronic positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia, on a low secure inpatient unit. Nine participants completed baseline and post‐intervention measures of insight, self‐esteem and knowledge about schizophrenia. Additional post‐intervention measures included compliance with medication, feelings about schizophrenia, qualitative views and access to the community. Overall, the results were positive within the limits of this small‐scale study. Following the intervention, most participants reported that they were less frightened about psychosis, and felt more in control of their illness and more optimistic about their future. This study suggests that there may be clinical benefits of having CBT‐orientated educational groups in low secure settings with clients with longstanding co‐existing positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Recovery style should be evaluated systematically in future studies.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Heather Castillo and Shulamit Ramon

While shared decision making (SDM) in general health has proven effectiveness, it has received far less attention within mental health practice with a disconnection…

Abstract

Purpose

While shared decision making (SDM) in general health has proven effectiveness, it has received far less attention within mental health practice with a disconnection between policy and ideals. The purpose of this paper to review existing developments, contemporary challenges, and evidence regarding SDM in mental health with a particular focus on the perspectives of service users.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a review of international papers analysed using narrative synthesis of relevant data bases.

Findings

The review shows significant barriers to the utilisation of SDM including ethical and legal frameworks, accountability and risk. The medical model of psychiatry and diagnostic stigma also contributes to a lack of professional acknowledgement of service user expertise. Service users experience an imbalance of power and feel they lack choices, being “done to” rather than “worked with”.

Practical implications

The paper also presents perspectives about how barriers can be overcome, and service users enabled to take back power and acknowledge their own expertise.

Originality/value

This review is the first with a particular focus on the perspectives of service users and SDM.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2013

Simon Lawton-Smith

This paper aims to provide a summary of where peer support currently sits in the UK mental health services policy and practice. It presents an overview of models of peer…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a summary of where peer support currently sits in the UK mental health services policy and practice. It presents an overview of models of peer support; the UK national policy on peer support; evidence of the benefits of peer support; case studies of recent and continuing peer support in action; challenges facing peer support; and suggestions for developing peer support in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper selects and discusses evidence from academic literature and policy and practice on peer support within the UK.

Findings

The evidence base demonstrating the benefits of peer support in mental health across the UK is increasing. This has persuaded UK governmental bodies to encourage the development of peer support services, of which there is a number of models and examples, although the current economic climate poses challenges to their development.

Originality/value

Historically, peer support in mental health services across the UK has developed piecemeal. But at a time when policy-makers, health practitioners and people who use mental health services are increasingly recognising the benefits of peer support, this paper draws key evidence together and provides pointers towards the future development of such services.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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