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Article

Abdul Rais A.R., Zahari M.S.M., Chik C.T. and Hanafiah M.H.

The purpose of this paper is to confirm the inter-relationship between healthy cafeteria attributes, perceived value, eating behaviour, satisfaction and post-purchase…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to confirm the inter-relationship between healthy cafeteria attributes, perceived value, eating behaviour, satisfaction and post-purchase behaviour in the hospital setting.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model proposed comprises of five latent variables representing healthy cafeteria attributes, perceived value, eating behaviour, satisfaction and post-purchase behaviour. A total of 570 completed questionnaires were collected, and the hypotheses were tested using structural equation modelling.

Findings

This study found that eating behaviour and satisfaction significantly mediates the relationship between healthy cafeteria attributes and customers’ post-purchase behaviour. Meanwhile, customers’ perceived value weakly moderates the relationship between healthy cafeteria and eating behaviour.

Originality/value

This paper is among the first few which attempt to holistically measure the attributes that influence people to visit healthy cafeterias and the subsequent effect they have towards their post-purchase behaviour. The novelty of this study is portrayed through the inclusion of eating behaviour and the perceived value dimension in healthy foodservice study, which is still minimal compared to commercial foodservice.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Linda P. Booth, R.J. Neale and Colin H. Tilston

A pilot survey was conducted at two secondary schools inNottinghamshire in order to determine lunchtime arrangements,expenditure, factors affecting food choice, the…

Abstract

A pilot survey was conducted at two secondary schools in Nottinghamshire in order to determine lunchtime arrangements, expenditure, factors affecting food choice, the popularity of other foods and eating‐out places, the satisfaction with the dining room and the reasons for not using the cafeteria. A total of 839 questionnaires completed by the children were analysed. The survey revealed a decline in the use of the cafeteria with increasing age. The amount spent at lunchtime was a significant factor in indicating whether the child had a school meal. Variety was the main factor affecting food choice. Future research will examine in greater detail the non‐cafeteria user in order to develop targeting strategies for increasing school meal uptake.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 92 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Charles H. Feldman, Heather Hartwell, Joseph Brusca, Haiyan Su and Hang Zhao

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the influence of nutritional information on menu choices in a higher educational setting using a menu designed by the students…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the influence of nutritional information on menu choices in a higher educational setting using a menu designed by the students themselves.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on USDA healthy eating standards, a menu comprising seven healthy and seven unhealthy meal options were presented, once unlabeled as control (n=214) and once labeled with healthy and non-healthy nutrient icons as an intervention test menu (n=212).

Findings

Findings demonstrate that despite a positive observed trend, there were no significant differences between healthy selection of labeled and unlabeled dishes (p=0.16).

Practical implications

Providing nutritional information in student cafeterias may be challenging but helpful. However, more strategies need to be developed with student input to provide nutrition data on menus in an informative, comprehensive, yet friendly way that encourages healthy eating in campus foodservices.

Social implications

No labeling system or legislation can control choices made by individuals, so the responsibility for a healthy selection must always remain personal. However, consumers should have input on menus as they have a stake in the outcome of the products.

Originality/value

This novel study tested a student-designed menu to assess whether user input can influence food choice.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Benedetta Grandi, Maria Grazia Cardinali and Silvia Bellini

The wide literature about healthy behaviours posits that a high level of self-control is required in order to make healthy choices. This work intends to demonstrate that…

Abstract

Purpose

The wide literature about healthy behaviours posits that a high level of self-control is required in order to make healthy choices. This work intends to demonstrate that retailers, through the management of in-store marketing levers, can influence shopping behaviour, no matter which is the individual tendency to engage in cognitive behaviours. For this specific purpose, we have considered participants' “Need for Cognition” as a proxy of self-control.

Design/methodology/approach

With reference to a specific category (cookies), we created a new display based on benefits (healthy eating) rather than products' attributes. A pre-test was conducted before the main experiment in order to assess the potential ability of the new nutritional display to help customers selecting healthier products, by testing participants' awareness and comprehension of the stimuli proposed. Then, an online between-subjects experiment was conducted by simulating the shoppers' expedition in the cookies' aisle inside a store with the aim to demonstrate that healthy choices can be also made on impulse.

Findings

Our findings showed that when both communication and visual cues are provided, people low in need for cognition (NFC) are more willing to select healthy products from the shelf, compared with people high in NFC.

Originality/value

While there is a wide literature explaining the mechanisms supporting healthy choices, fewer are the contributions about the role of retailers in promoting healthy eating through in-store marketing levers. More important, there is no contribution about how to promote health among people with low level of self-control.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article

Joy‐Telu Hamilton‐Ekeke and Malcolm Thomas

The paper aims to investigate the relationship between meal choices of primary school children and their knowledge of balanced diet and healthy eating.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to investigate the relationship between meal choices of primary school children and their knowledge of balanced diet and healthy eating.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a questionnaire and food photo album (FPA), children combined the different food items in the FPA to form a “healthy Sunday lunch” (balanced meal containing all the six classes of food), a “favourite Sunday lunch” (what they would like for a Sunday lunch) and “last Sunday lunch” (what they had the previous Sunday for lunch). Overall, 110 questionnaires were returned and analyzed.

Findings

Participants' choice of a favourite Sunday lunch had a better representation of the various classes of a balanced healthy meal (X=71.8 and SD=24.0) compared with their ability to create a healthy Sunday lunch, which did not reflect adequately the six classes of food (X=59.8 and SD=36.9). Last Sunday lunch had a good representation of the various classes of food (X=70.7, SD=24.8). Girls had a better ability to plan a healthy Sunday lunch than boys.

Research limitations/implications

The study was carried out with year 6 pupils (n=110) in four primary schools in rural Mid‐Wales. Thus, the generality of these findings to children from other demographics is unclear.

Practical implications

There was no significant relationship between pupils' choice of food and their knowledge of balanced diet.

Originality/value

The results suggested that children will make “healthy choices” but need the knowledge underpinning these “healthy choices” in order to affect their attitude towards healthy eating.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 109 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

G. Scott Erickson, Marlene Barken and David Barken

This study aims to examine the installation of a garden at an elementary school. Bringing in elements of healthy eating choices, the local food movement and social…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the installation of a garden at an elementary school. Bringing in elements of healthy eating choices, the local food movement and social marketing implications for all stakeholders, this study examines the genesis and launch of the garden and related activities. It reviews initial results, again with an eye to different stakeholder groups.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study methodology was applied.

Findings

The case study method provides some depth of detail to a unique and specific circumstance. As such it allows bringing together so many streams of the literature in a social marketing context and illuminates how and why such an installation works (and does not work).

Research limitations/implications

This analysis focuses on a specific example, in a specific location and at a specific time. While potentially extendable, any such attempt should be made with care.

Practical implications

Social marketing installations are hard. This example demonstrates how even the best-intentioned program, with almost universal agreement on its positive aspects, can be difficult to execute.

Social implications

This case illustrates full range of social marketing concepts applied to an initiative but is particularly illustrative of the potential and importance of including all stakeholders in co-creation while fully understanding their context, perceived benefits and perceived costs/barriers.

Originality/value

This study uniquely brings together several strains of theory (food literacy, health eating choices by children, institutional food services and local food) and applies them separately and together in a single application.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article

Krzysztof Kubacki, Sharyn Rundle-Thiele, Ville Lahtinen and Joy Parkinson

– This study aims to review the extent that social marketing principles are applied in interventions targeting children published in peer-reviewed journals between 2000 and 2014.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to review the extent that social marketing principles are applied in interventions targeting children published in peer-reviewed journals between 2000 and 2014.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review was conducted to identify peer-reviewed social marketing studies targeting children under the age of 12 years as their main audience. Twenty-three interventions were identified and analysed using Andreasen’s (2002) social marketing benchmark criteria including behavioural objective, audience segmentation, formative research, exchange, marketing mix and competition.

Findings

All of the interventions analysed in this review targeted behaviours associated with either physical activity or healthy eating among children under the age of 12 years. Sixteen of the studies reported positive behavioural outcomes. None of the studies used all six of the Andresean (2002) benchmark criteria.

Social implications

With growing concerns about the prevalence of obesity among children, social marketing is emerging as an effective approach to increase physical activity and healthy eating, which in turn may assist to lower obesity. Extending the application of the social marketing benchmark criteria in social marketing interventions will assist to increase effectiveness.

Originality/value

This paper presents the first attempt to review the extent that social marketing principles are used in interventions targeted at children aged 12 years and under.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article

Andrew Charles Montandon and Christopher Colli

The fast-food market is one area which faces little regulation of visible nutritional information on menus and food packaging to encourage healthy food choices…

Abstract

Purpose

The fast-food market is one area which faces little regulation of visible nutritional information on menus and food packaging to encourage healthy food choices. Additionally, nutritional information’s effectiveness is mostly unknown in the fast-food market. The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into the effectiveness of various forms of nutritional labelling methods and information by analysing the consumer decision-making process of 248 fast-food consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

Three discrete choice experiments are used to compare three popular nutritional symbol methods. Consumer preferences for these symbols are extracted using a “choice-based” conjoint analysis, while controlling for price and branding of fast-food products.

Findings

It is found that a very simple “traffic light signal” is the best signal for suggesting healthiness, with as much as 41 per cent of the importance in consumer decision making (p<0.01), over that of product pricing and even product brand and performs better than more information laden guided daily amounts symbols and health endorsement methods (attributing 27 and 13 per cent in their respective studies). This highlights the fine balance between too much and too little food nutrition information and (most notably) how specific nutritional information methods can be even more influential on food choices than a change in product price might.

Originality/value

There is currently a lack of research into the use of nutritional cues on influencing fast-food choices. Additionally, most previous studies focus on the isolated effect of nutrition labels.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Gönül Söyler and Sedef Nehir El

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how Turkish consumers’ attitudes toward grammatical styles of the same nutrition message affect persuasiveness; to determine…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how Turkish consumers’ attitudes toward grammatical styles of the same nutrition message affect persuasiveness; to determine the consumers’ ability to comply with the nutrition messages and to know possible health benefits of them; and to examine nutrient claims on food packages with information that will help consumers to make healthy diet choices.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire, comprising eight different grammatical styles of a nutrition message for each kind of food or food products, is applied to randomly to 207 subjects. Another questionnaire is designed including nutritional messages. Subjects (n = 200) are asked about their frequency of compliance and how this behavior is beneficial to health. In total, 5,200 food products are scanned for nutrition labels on packages in four hypermarkets. All the nutrient claims found are recorded as well as the wording.

Findings

There are significant effects of grammatical style on persuasiveness, except for meat products. Subjects report that rhetorical question using “how about” in the third message provokes them most. High proportions of subjects have heard of the written nutrition recommendations before. However subjects’ frequencies of compliance with recommendations are low. The relation between compliance and knowledge scores for message 1, 2, 3 and 4 are significant (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05). Of 5,200 foods scanned, 266 foods are recorded for nutrient claims. Fat claims are the most frequent type of nutrient claims; 71 foods have numerical claims; 179 foods have adjectival claims and 16 have both claims.

Originality/value

There have not been any studies on frequency of application of nutrition labeling, consumer attitudes and knowledge of nutrition messages regarding Turkey.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article

Yin-Ju Chen and Jian-Ming Lo

Decision-making is always an issue that managers have to deal with. Keenly observing to different preferences of the targets provides useful information for…

Abstract

Purpose

Decision-making is always an issue that managers have to deal with. Keenly observing to different preferences of the targets provides useful information for decision-makers who do not require too much information to make decisions. The main purpose is to avoid decision-makers in a dilemma because of too much or opaque information. Based on problem-oriented, this research aims to help decision-makers to develop a macro-vision strategy that fits the needs of different clusters of customers in terms of their favorite restaurants. This research also focuses on providing the rules to rank data sets for decision-makers to make choices for their favorite restaurant.

Design/methodology/approach

When the decision-makers need to rethink a new strategic planning, they have to think about whether they want to retain or rebuild their relationship with the old consumers or continue to care for new customers. Furthermore, many of the lecturers show that the relative concept will be more effective than the absolute one. Therefore, based on rough set theory, this research proposes an algorithm of related concepts and sends questionnaires to verify the efficiency of the algorithm.

Findings

By feeding the relative order of calculating the ranking rules, we find that it will be more efficient to deal with the faced problems.

Originality/value

The algorithm proposed in this research is applied to the ranking data of food. This research proves that the algorithm is practical and has the potential to reveal important patterns in the data set.

Details

Data Technologies and Applications, vol. 55 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9288

Keywords

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