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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Louis Rice

The design of the built environment is a determinant of health. Accordingly, there is an increasing need for greater harmonization of the architectural profession and…

Abstract

Purpose

The design of the built environment is a determinant of health. Accordingly, there is an increasing need for greater harmonization of the architectural profession and public health. However, there is a lack of knowledge on whether designers of the built environment are changing their practices to deliver healthier urban habitats. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses a multi-method approach to data analysis, including: systematic mapping study, structured review and thematic analysis.

Findings

The research finds that there are almost no requirements for the compulsory inclusion of health across institutions and agencies that have the power to execute and mandate the scope of architectural profession, training, education, practice or knowledge. Despite the urgent need for action and the myriad entreatments for greater integration between architecture and health, there is very little evidence progress.

Practical implications

The research has implications for the architectural profession and architectural education. Health and well-being is not currently an integral part of the educational or professional training requirements for architects. University educational curriculum and Continuing Professional Development criteria need to better integrate health and well-being into their knowledge-base.

Social implications

The design of the built environment is currently undertaken by an architectural profession that lacks specialized knowledge of health and well-being. There is a risk to society of environments that fail to adequately protect and promote the health and well-being of its inhabitants.

Originality/value

The research evidences, for the first time, the lack of integration of “health and wellbeing” within the architecture profession training or education systems.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Bhzad Sidawi and Mark Deakin

Diabetes mellitus is the most common non-communicable medical condition worldwide, yet little is known about the relationship this disease has to the built environment

Abstract

Purpose

Diabetes mellitus is the most common non-communicable medical condition worldwide, yet little is known about the relationship this disease has to the built environment. The purpose of this paper is to throw some much needed light on the matter by shifting attention away from the epidemiology of the medical condition and towards the anthropology of the unhealthy lifestyles whose habit-persistent practices are associated with the spread of the disease.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the delicate relation between diabetes, unhealthy lifestyles and built environments. It discusses the potential of smart city technologies to promote healthy lifestyles, particularly for diabetic patients.

Findings

Smart cities currently being developed in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) do not highlight the health-related benefits of their design and layout and there are currently no plans for the community to address the unhealthy lifestyles of existing neighbourhoods as part of a sustainable urban development programme. So, realising the health-related benefits of smart city neighbourhoods in the KSA shall be challenging.

Research limitations/implications

In attempting to tackle diabetes, cities not only need to be “green and lean” in planning the healthy lifestyles they set out for the development of communities, but also “get smart” about the digital technologies and platform of electronically enhanced services which are required to meet the design and layout challenges smart city neighbourhoods pose.

Originality/value

Gulf and Saudi cities should adopt the IntelCities analogy, so the virtual planning and development of “smart city neighbourhoods”, along with their design and layout of buildings, can tackle the underlying causes.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Maria Nyberg and Tenna Doktor Olsen

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how eating, the built environment and social relations are related through the concept of a meal, in the hope that workplaces…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss how eating, the built environment and social relations are related through the concept of a meal, in the hope that workplaces managers will consider more than nutrition and exercise in their future health strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on the findings of a sociological empirical study on workplace eating habits and an architectural theoretical study on the impact of built environment on meal experiences in general.

Findings

Together, the findings of the two studies imply that management considerations on healthy workplace eating should be supplemented with more conscious architectural and social considerations on how built environment stages certain meal behaviors and facilitate bonding among employees.

Research limitations/implications

More research needs to be done in order to better understand the relationship between intentional staging of the meal and health aspects in workplaces. This must include both developments within research methods, a larger sample of workplaces, as well as the possibility to make interventions within this particular area.

Practical implications

The paper argues that contemporary workplaces have lost their ability to fully stage meals, and proposes that a research strategy should be developed, broadening the healthy workplace meal approach with that of social science and architectural design.

Originality/value

This exploratory effort to combine sociological perspectives in the study of the meal at work with theories from architectural design has been fruitful in comprehending the full complexity of providing opportunities for healthier meals at work. The paper is of value to workplace managers, suggesting they consider more than nutrition and exercise in their future health strategies.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Emelieke Huisman, Rianne Appel-Meulenbroek, Helianthe Kort and Theo Arentze

Board members and real estate managers (decision makers) play an important role in the decision-making process in nursing home organisations. This study aims to provide an…

Abstract

Purpose

Board members and real estate managers (decision makers) play an important role in the decision-making process in nursing home organisations. This study aims to provide an understanding of underlying attributes and benefits sought by decision makers when making nursing home real estate decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

Decision makers from seven different nursing home organisations in The Netherlands were interviewed using the laddering technique to determine the individual requirements, the considerations of the decision alternatives, the relevant attributes and benefits and their mutual relationships.

Findings

This study details the motivations behind real estate management decisions in nursing home organisations. The findings show that apart from financial considerations, decision makers strive to enhance the quality of life and satisfaction of users with their real estate decisions and seek to include residents and employees in the process. These benefits are connected to the goals of well-being and innovation in health care. Furthermore, functionality, physical and functional flexibility and technology are key considerations when undertaking corporate real estate (CRE) decisions, to ensure that real estate management aligns with the strategic goals of the nursing home organisation.

Practical implications

The insights of this study can support decision makers in healthcare facilities to create strategic value with their real estate. Understanding how to obtain certain benefits from nursing home real estate may result in a better realisation of organisational objectives and user needs.

Originality/value

This study reveals the decision-making process in a nursing home context. Moreover, the laddering technique is used as a new method to explore and gain a deep understanding of CRE decision-making processes.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2020

Jeannette E. Nijkamp and Mark P. Mobach

Most people live in cities and work in offices, two contexts offering many lifestyle-related and environmental health risks. To advance their health, this paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

Most people live in cities and work in offices, two contexts offering many lifestyle-related and environmental health risks. To advance their health, this paper aims to introduce an analogy between urban design and facility design to explore whether health-directed design interventions in cities and facilities are related and to look for applicable cross-overs and opportunities to develop the facility management (FM) profession on the urban level.

Design/methodology/approach

The principles of abductive reasoning as a first phase of scientific investigation were followed, by introducing a new idea and attentively observing phenomena in the communities of FM and urban design. The method was desk research, in the context of discovery.

Findings

Many possible cross-overs exist which offer opportunities for urban planners and facility managers to reinforce each other and interesting market opportunities for the further development of urban FM. However, more systematic research is needed on efficacious and effective interventions. Furthermore, experiences and capacities of the FM sector should be unlocked and applied within a city context, as the knowledge and experiences of facility managers and urban planners can create synergy.

Practical implications

The findings are directly applicable to facility and urban design practices and to FM education by involving students in city design practices.

Originality/value

Cross-overs between facilities and cities are new and can inspire both facility managers and urban planners to work together more closely for the benefit of citizens and employees.

Details

Facilities , vol. 38 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2017

Harshini Mallawaarachchi, Lalith De Silva and Raufdeen Rameezdeen

The purpose of the study presented in this paper is to determine the relationship and effect of built environment on occupants’ productivity in green-certified office…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study presented in this paper is to determine the relationship and effect of built environment on occupants’ productivity in green-certified office buildings in Sri Lanka.

Design/methodology/approach

Two research hypotheses were tested by approaching the survey method under the quantitative phenomenon. The questionnaire survey was conducted among randomly selected occupants in three selected green-rated office buildings in Sri Lanka. The survey data were analysed by using the Spearman correlation and ordinal logistic regression analysis techniques to model the relationship existing between the variables. The SPSS v20 software was used in data analysis.

Findings

The findings confirm the relationship between built environment and occupants’ productivity. As it further proves that, there is a significant effect of built environment on occupants’ productivity in green-certified office buildings. Thus, critical built environment factors influencing occupants’ productivity and their effect were determined.

Practical implications

The findings could be practically implied as bases to strengthen the evaluation criteria of indoor environmental quality in GREENSL® national green-rating system.

Originality/value

The evaluation of occupants’ productivity and the built environment factors has been at the focal point of research; however, most studies have focused on single aspects of the built environment. Further, no evidences were found on “which factors” can critically influence the occupants’ productivity in green buildings. The paper, therefore, seeks to fill this gap by proving the relationship between green built environment and occupants’ productivity.

Details

Facilities, vol. 35 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Trevor Hancock

States that it seems self‐evident that a hospital should be a healing environment, a healthy place to work, should not harm the health of the environment and should…

Abstract

States that it seems self‐evident that a hospital should be a healing environment, a healthy place to work, should not harm the health of the environment and should contribute to and be a source of health in the community, but argues that hospitals have not paid a great deal of attention to many of these issues until recently. Suggests that in recent years, a new and broader understanding of health promotion has led to a re‐examination of the ways in which hospitals can be both healthy and health‐promoting. Begins by exploring the broader concepts of health promotion that lay the foundation for the creation of healthy and health‐promoting hospitals and provides some examples of how these approaches are being applied.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-0756

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2020

Milan Sijakovic and Ana Peric

Excessive amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) undoubtedly lead to climate change, which directly affects both the natural and the built environment. Observing the impact of…

Abstract

Purpose

Excessive amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) undoubtedly lead to climate change, which directly affects both the natural and the built environment. Observing the impact of climate change on the construction industry, this paper examines sustainable architectural design as a tool to mitigate climate change.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve the previous goal, the authors conduct a comprehensive documentary analysis of three types of sources: (1) scholarly articles in the fields of climate research, sustainable construction, green buildings and sustainable architecture; (2) contemporary global reports on climate change and its impact on the built environment and (3) practitioners' guides explaining practical architectural solutions to the climate crisis.

Findings

The systematic analysis provides three types of results: objectives, strategies and principles of sustainable architectural design aimed at mitigating the effects of climate change. On the one hand, the research results provide a solid basis for further conceptual research into architectural design responsive to the effects of changing climate. On the other hand, the detailed strategies and principles are relevant for urban designers and architects.

Originality/value

Among a range of literature in the field of climate change and its effects on the built environment, a particular value of the paper is in addressing a very local level, i.e. the level of individual building and its immediate surroundings. More specifically, this paper provides concrete design components that help reduce CO2 emissions, finally decreasing the vulnerability index of urban systems.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

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Book part
Publication date: 16 June 2017

Yochai Eisenberg, Erin D. Bouldin, Nancy Gell and Dori Rosenberg

The size of the population classified as people with disabilities or older adults is increasing globally. The World Health Organization estimates that the average…

Abstract

The size of the population classified as people with disabilities or older adults is increasing globally. The World Health Organization estimates that the average prevalence of disability is around 18% among adults age 18 and older. People with disabilities and older adults have lower levels of physical activity and experience significant barriers to walking in local neighbourhoods. A new perspective is needed that views disability in the context of the built environment and across the lifespan. The purpose of this chapter is to examine walking as an activity that is inclusive of any age, ability or assistive device used for mobility. Through a literature review, we illustrate the complex relationship that exists between individuals with disabilities/older adults and the built environment. We describe environmental and social factors, which have been found to be associated with walking among people with disabilities and older adults as well as factors perceived to be barriers to walking. Factors cited in the literature include aspects that fall into the environmental domains of the International Classification of Functioning. We conclude by highlighting key factors needed for planning supportive walking environments for people with disabilities and older adults. Recommendations include the use of walking audits to gain information on detailed aspects of the built environment, developing inclusive walking initiatives, including people with disabilities and older adults in the planning process and planning for maintenance.

Details

Walking
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-628-0

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

W.H.C.D Kumara, K.G.A.S. Waidyasekara and R.P.N.P. Weerasinghe

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate the contribution of building management system (BMS) towards a sustainable built environment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the contribution of building management system (BMS) towards a sustainable built environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on the findings of a comprehensive literature survey, preliminary survey and a structured questionnaire survey. Quantitative data were analysed using a relative importance index. Content analysis was used for the qualitative data analysis.

Findings

The results show that identifying user requirements, identifying BMS features, designing BMS, installation and commissioning, and operation and maintenance are the key steps in the BMS implementation process. High cost, lack of knowledge on BMS, unavailability of service and maintenance, and inadequate performance of BMS vendors were highlighted as barriers when adopting a BMS. Energy efficiency, reduction of operation and maintenance cost, occupant satisfaction, productivity, fault diagnosis, thermal comfort, indoor air quality, emergency response and level of controllability of building systems are some of the significant BMS functions that accomplish economic, environment and social sustainability pillars.

Practical implications

This study increases the awareness on functionality of a BMS and its potential contribution towards a sustainable built environment.

Originality/value

The study develops strong ties between BMS contribution and sustainability where built environment professionals could use the developed decision support model towards a sustainable built environment through the application of BMS.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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