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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2021

Ashley K. Barrett

Although resilience is heavily studied in both the healthcare and organizational change literatures, it has received less attention in healthcare information technology…

Abstract

Purpose

Although resilience is heavily studied in both the healthcare and organizational change literatures, it has received less attention in healthcare information technology (HIT) implementation research. Healthcare organizations are consistently in the process of implementing and updating several complex technologies. Implementations and updates are challenged because healthcare workers often struggle to perceive the benefits of HITs and experience deficiencies in system design, yet bear the brunt of the blame for implementation failures. This combination implores healthcare workers to exercise HIT resilience; however, how they talk about this construct has been left unexplored. Subsequently, this study explores healthcare workers' communicative constitution of HIT resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

Twenty-three physicians (N = 23), specializing in oncology, pediatrics or anesthesiology, were recruited from one healthcare organization to participate in comprehensive interviews during and after the implementation of an updated HIT system DIPS.

Findings

Thematic analysis findings reveal physicians communicatively constituted HIT resilience as their (1) convictions in the continued, positive developments of newer HIT iterations, which marked their current adaptive HIT behaviors as temporary, and (2) contributions to inter-organizational HIT brainstorming projects in which HIT designers, IT staff and clinicians jointly problem-solved current HIT inadequacies and created new HIT features.

Originality/value

Offering both practical for healthcare leaders and managers and theoretical implications for HIT and resilience scholars, this study's results suggest that (1) healthcare leaders must work diligently to create a culture of collaborative HIT design in their organization to help facilitate the success of new HIT use, and (2) information technology scholars reevaluate the theoretical meaningfulness a technology's spirit and reconsider the causal nature of a technology's embedded structures.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2020

Michele N. Medina-Craven and Kathryn Ostermeier

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationships between workplace bullying, organizational justice dimensions and intentions to leave. The authors posit that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationships between workplace bullying, organizational justice dimensions and intentions to leave. The authors posit that workplace bullying is positively related to intentions to leave, and that this effect is transmitted through lower justice perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors surveyed 146 healthcare workers, using factor analysis and the Preacher and Hayes (2008) PROCESS macro to test their hypotheses.

Findings

The study results indicate that workplace bullying is positively associated with intentions to leave. This effect is transmitted through lower entity-based distributive justice perceptions.

Research limitations/implications

The study sample was cross-sectional and collected at a single point in time. Future research should examine these relationships in a longitudinal method.

Practical implications

The study results suggest that when a healthcare worker experiences bullying in the workplace, they begin to perceive their organization as more unfair. These negative feelings toward their organization lead to a desire to permanently separate from the organization. These results suggest that workplace bullying has serious ramifications for turnover, and that healthcare organizations can mitigate these negative effects by increasing perceptions of organizational justice through being transparent about their decisions and the process going into this decision-making.

Originality/value

These findings extend existing research by empirically testing the effects of workplace bullying on intentions to leave within the healthcare industry.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2020

Jennie Haw, Jessica Polzer and Dana V. Devine

This paper aims to examine emotional labour in the work of frontline staff (FLS) of the Canadian Blood Services' Cord Blood Bank (CBB), contributes to understandings of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine emotional labour in the work of frontline staff (FLS) of the Canadian Blood Services' Cord Blood Bank (CBB), contributes to understandings of emotional labour by allied healthcare workers and suggests implications for healthcare managers.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative interviews with 15 FLS were conducted and analyzed as part of a process evaluation of donor recruitment and cord blood collection in Canada.

Findings

Emotional labour with donors and hospital staff emerged as a vital component of FLS' donor recruitment and cord blood collection work. Emotional labour was performed with donors to contribute to a positive birthing experience, facilitate communication and provide support. Emotional labour was performed with hospital staff to gain acceptance and build relationships, enlist support and navigate hierarchies of authority.

Research limitations/implications

The results indicate that FLS perform emotional labour with women to provide donor care and with hospital staff to facilitate organizational conditions. The findings are based on FLS' accounts of their work and would be enhanced by research that examines the perspectives of donors and hospital staff.

Practical implications

Attention should be paid to organizational conditions that induce the performance of emotional labour and may add to FLS workload. Formal reciprocal arrangements between FLS and hospital staff may reduce the responsibility on FLS and enable them to focus on recruitment and collections.

Originality/value

This paper addresses a gap in the healthcare management literature by identifying the emotional labour of allied healthcare workers. It also contributes to the cord blood banking literature by providing empirically grounded analysis of frontline collection staff.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2021

Andrea Tomo and Stefania De Simone

This study aims to test the relationship between ageing, professional status and well-being and the moderating role that job resources might have in this relationship.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to test the relationship between ageing, professional status and well-being and the moderating role that job resources might have in this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors relied upon the literature on well-being and the job demands–resources (JD-R) model and employed the Copenhagen psychological questionnaire administered to patient care workers in three paediatric hospitals belonging to the same healthcare organization.

Findings

The findings, on the one hand, confirm a not-significant relationship between ageing, professional status and well-being; on the other hand, they indicate that job resources have a positive, significant and direct impact on well-being and a significant role in moderating the relationship between ageing, professional status and well-being.

Originality/value

The present paper has manifold academic and practical interesting implications as it contributes to the literature on the well-being of healthcare workers and provides implications to identify interventions for better human resource (HR) management in the healthcare context.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2013

Mette Irmgard Snertingdal

In this paper the aim is to explore what modes of governance, brief alcohol interventions in natal care, such as screening and motivational interviewing (MI) represent…

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper the aim is to explore what modes of governance, brief alcohol interventions in natal care, such as screening and motivational interviewing (MI) represent, and what social consequences this mode of governance might lead to. Traditionally the Nordic public health research on alcohol control policies gives priority to general control measures aimed at the population. However, the paper seeks to argue the relevance of a governmentality perspective to analyze the mode of governance in brief alcohol interventions which aims at individual level of control.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical base of the paper rests on the contents of a brief intervention educational program aimed at midwifes and medical doctors in natal care in Norway. In light of the governmentality perspective the author analyzes screening and MI used in natal care as a mode of governance which fosters the process of responsibilization and the creation of the “irresponsible other”.

Findings

It is argued that brief alcohol intervention in natal care is a perfect example of a neoliberal mode of governance, because it is an indirect way of governance, which casts healthcare workers as a part of the state that wants to make pregnant woman self‐governing and responsible. Further this neoliberal mode of governance might lead to four different social consequences: blurring the line between the power of the state and the power of the self, which blurs the distinction between objective health hazards and moral judgment; spreading of powerful therapeutic‐tools to non‐therapeutic professions further neutralizes the moral dimensions; individualization of responsibilities for fetal health decontextualizes females' drinking habits; and drawing the attention of the healthcare worker towards regulations of normality and away from helping females with severe drinking problems.

Originality/value

Traditionally the Nordic public health research on alcohol control policies gives priority to general control measures aimed at the population. However, this paper shows the relevance of a governmentality perspective to analyze the mode of governance inherent in brief alcohol interventions which aims at an individual level of control. Alongside the general control measures in Norwegian alcohol policies, the state engages women at an individual level, through brief and early interventions. Hence the state has double targets of governance; first the general risk‐avoidance regulations directed at the population, and then the state also facilitating the targeting of individuals.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Boonsom Namsomboon and Kyoko Kusakabe

The purpose of this paper is to examine women homeworkers' access to healthcare services in Thailand. Specifically, it focuses on how the state's universal healthcare

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine women homeworkers' access to healthcare services in Thailand. Specifically, it focuses on how the state's universal healthcare service, introduced in the year 2002, has responded/not responded to the needs of poor women homeworkers in Bangkok.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection was done through a structured questionnaire with 415 women homeworkers from 16 districts in Bangkok, Thailand, ten in‐depth interviews and 13 group discussions.

Findings

It was found that less than half of the women homeworker respondents accessed the universal healthcare scheme. The obstacles for access include both financial (transportation cost, loss of wage) and time. Also, homeworkers need support from the community/household to access these services. Universal health services itself is not enough to ensure access to healthcare service, especially among poor and minimally educated homeworkers with small children.

Practical implications

The research showed the need to have multiple approaches (state‐provided services and community organizing, as well as awareness among men about their role in care work), in order to ensure universal healthcare coverage.

Originality/value

Universal healthcare services are considered the best way to extend healthcare services to workers in the informal economy. This paper argues that total dependence on state‐provided services does not ensure universal healthcare coverage. There is a need for additional community‐based support mechanisms to ensure access to these services.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 31 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Aysegul Karaeminogullari, Berrin Erdogan and Talya N. Bauer

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between stress due to mistreatment by patients and caregivers’ own well-being indicators (anxiety, depression, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between stress due to mistreatment by patients and caregivers’ own well-being indicators (anxiety, depression, and behavioral stress indicators). Based on predictions consistent with the job demands-resources model, it is anticipated that satisfaction with job resources would moderate the relationship between mistreatment by patients and well-being indicators.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses were tested with a sample of 182 employees in a leading training and research university hospital in Istanbul, Turkey. Results were partially replicated for a separate sample of 122 healthcare workers. Data were collected using the survey methodology.

Findings

The findings suggest that patient injustice is positively related to depression and behavioral stress indicators when satisfaction with job resources is high. Results illustrate that satisfaction with job resources has a sensitizing, rather than a buffering, role on the relation between mistreatment by patients, depression, and behavioral stress indicators, negatively affecting employees with higher levels of satisfaction with job resources.

Originality/value

Organizational justice researchers recently started recognizing that in addition to organizational insiders, organizational outsiders such as customers and patients may also be sources of fair and unfair treatment. Based on this stream of research, unfair treatment from outsiders is associated with retaliation and a variety of negative employee outcomes. The study extends the currently accumulated work by examining how mistreatment from care recipients relates to healthcare workers’ own health outcomes.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2013

Alison Ledger, Jane Edwards and Michael Morley

– The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how a change management perspective contributes new understandings about music therapy implementation processes.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how a change management perspective contributes new understandings about music therapy implementation processes.

Design/methodology/approach

Narrative inquiry, ethnography, and arts-based research methods were used to explore the experiences of 12 music therapists who developed new services in healthcare settings. These experiences were interpreted using insights from the field of change management.

Findings

A change management perspective helps to explain music therapists' experiences of resistance and struggle when introducing their services to established health care teams. Organisational change theories and models highlight possible strategies for implementing music therapy services successfully, such as organisational assessment, communication and collaboration with other workers, and the appointment of a service development steering group.

Research limitations/implications

This paper offers exciting possibilities for developing understanding of music therapists' experiences and for supporting the growth of this burgeoning profession.

Practical implications

There is an important need for professional supervision for music therapists in the service development phase, to support them in coping with resistance and setbacks. Healthcare managers and workers are encouraged to consider ways in which they can support the development of a new music therapy service, such as observing music therapy work and sharing organisational priorities and cultures with a new music therapist.

Originality/value

Previous accounts of music therapy service development have indicated that music therapists encounter complex interprofessional issues when they join an established health care team. A change management perspective offers a new lens through which music therapists' experiences can be further understood.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2012

Charles C. Broz

The purpose of this paper is to survey current nutrition/foodservice‐related healthcare professionals to determine their level of knowledge about dysphagia, and their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to survey current nutrition/foodservice‐related healthcare professionals to determine their level of knowledge about dysphagia, and their perceptions of dysphagic patients and their needs.

Design/methodology/approach

A data collection instrument in the form of a questionnaire was developed to obtain an idea of the perceptions and knowledge‐level of diet/foodservice‐related healthcare workers about dysphagia. Subjects included foodservice workers, including food preparers and food deliverers at a large healthcare facility in the Southwestern United States. A total sample size of n=51 surveys was collected and analyzed.

Findings

Given the means from this sample group, healthcare foodservice workers are lacking in some areas of knowledge concerning dysphagia patients, and their dietary needs. Education and training seem indicated, as the number of patients suffering from some degree of dysphagia is only going to increase as the US population ages.

Originality/value

Millions of Americans currently suffer from at least some degree of dysphagia. This number is expected to increase as the Baby Boomer generation reaches retirement age. The USA will be populated by more elderly people than ever before, and will thus host more individuals suffering from swallowing impairment. This paper adds insights to the subject.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2019

Musarrat Shaheen, Farrah Zeba, Vaibhav Sekhar and Raveesh Krishnankutty

This paper aims to examine the influence of the work–family interface on both work engagement and the psychological capital (PsyCap) of the liquid workforce. Also, drawing…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the influence of the work–family interface on both work engagement and the psychological capital (PsyCap) of the liquid workforce. Also, drawing from the literature on consumer behaviour, the second objective of this paper is to investigate the impact of work engagement and PsyCap on customer advocacy.

Design/methodology

A dyadic study was conducted, comprising 200 nurses and 200 patients from different healthcare service providers of India. Structural equation modelling was used to analyse the responses collected from nurses and the patients whom they served.

Findings

The results confirm that the home–work interface has a positive impact on work engagement and PsyCap. The findings also confirm a positive impact of PsyCap on customer advocacy, but the effect of work engagement on customer advocacy was not significant.

Research implications

This study confirms that to keep liquid workers engaged in their work and to enhance their personal PsyCap, an organisation should provide the opportunity to maintain a balance between work and home needs. The findings also confirm that personal psychological resources (PsyCap) facilitate prosocial helping behaviour, which keeps customers closer and maintains them as true representatives of the organisation.

Originality/value

The present study is one of only a few preliminary studies examining the predictors of work engagement of liquid workers. Also, an inter-disciplinary approach was taken to understand the link between employee-level variables (home–work interface, work engagement and PsyCap) and a customer-level variable (customer advocacy).

Details

Journal of Global Operations and Strategic Sourcing, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5364

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