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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2009

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Book part
Publication date: 6 December 2018

Nicola Petrosillo and Rok ivljak

The largest ever outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD), which began in December 2013, profoundly impacted not only the West African countries of Guinea, Sierra Leone, and…

Abstract

The largest ever outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD), which began in December 2013, profoundly impacted not only the West African countries of Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia, and to a lesser extent Nigeria, but also the rest of the world because some patients needed to be managed in high-resource countries. As of March 29, 2016, there were 28,616 confirmed, probable, and suspected cases of EVD reported in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone during the outbreak, with 11,310 deaths (case fatality rate of 39.5%). An unprecedented number of healthcare workers and professionals, including physicians, nurses, logistic and administrative personnel, housekeepers, epidemiologists, statisticians, psychologists, sociologists, and ethics experts in many countries, were directly or indirectly involved in the care of EVD patients.

The provision of medical care to critically ill EVD patients would have been challenging in any setting but was especially so in the remote and resource-limited areas where patients were stricken by EVD. Limited health personnel, medical supplies, and equipment, along with inadequate knowledge and skills for minimizing the risks of transmission to healthcare workers, could have led to the de-prioritization of patient care. However, ethical considerations demanded aggressive patient care (intensive care, dialysis, central vascular catheter indwelling, etc.) to produce positive outcomes without increasing the risks to healthcare workers and caregivers.

A major ethical consideration was that healthcare workers have a double obligation: while providing the best medical care to improve EVD patient survival, with symptom relief and palliation as required, they must also protect themselves and minimize further transmission to others, including their colleagues. During the 2014–2015 EVD epidemic, another ethical and clinical problem arose in relation to the management of healthcare workers deployed in Africa who acquired EVD while caring for infected patients. As of June 24, 2015, a total of 65 individuals had been evacuated or repatriated worldwide from the EVD-affected countries, of whom 38 individuals were evacuated or repatriated to Europe. The need for evacuation and repatriation, together with associated ethical issues, is discussed in this chapter.

Details

Ethics and Integrity in Health and Life Sciences Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-572-8

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2009

Husayn Al Mahdy

Bangladesh has an outdated healthcare system that has not changed since its independence in 1971. The aim of this paper is to look into how the Bangladesh healthcare

Abstract

Purpose

Bangladesh has an outdated healthcare system that has not changed since its independence in 1971. The aim of this paper is to look into how the Bangladesh healthcare system can be reformed.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is literature‐based and a personal reflection on one country's health system.

Findings

Widespread dissatisfaction exists in the population and amongst doctors about healthcare delivery.

Practical implications

Major issues causing healthcare user dissatisfaction are discussed and recommendations for reform are suggested.

Originality/value

The paper provides an independent account of one country's healthcare policy and practice.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Kwabena G. Boakye, Charles Blankson, Victor R. Prybutok and Hong Qin

The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a healthcare framework of service quality, perceived value, and satisfaction in Ghana. More specifically, this study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a healthcare framework of service quality, perceived value, and satisfaction in Ghana. More specifically, this study investigates the role and effect of service quality on patient satisfaction and perceived value in Ghana’s healthcare delivery.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered through surveys administered to 113 healthcare patients in Ghana. partial least square-structural equation modeling analysis was used to empirically test the research model.

Findings

Results show healthcare quality significantly influences satisfaction and perceived value of healthcare delivery. Additionally, perceived value’s impact on satisfaction and behavioral intention shows that increasing perceived benefits while reducing perceived costs leads to repeat behavior and paves the way for retention strategy for healthcare management.

Research limitations/implications

This study yields a series of limitations in its results and conclusions. These limitations and future research are discussed in Section 7 of the study.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by examining the effects of healthcare service quality on patient satisfaction and perceived value, determining the effect of healthcare service quality on patients’ behavioral intention, and testing the proposed framework in Ghana, a fast growing and economically liberalized emerging country in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Noah Olasehinde and Olanrewaju Olaniyan

The purpose of this paper is to examine the determinants of health expenditure at the household level in Nigeria with specific focus on the household and individual unique…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the determinants of health expenditure at the household level in Nigeria with specific focus on the household and individual unique characteristics. It presents some stylised facts about the Nigerian health system and its financing options. It went further to show that household is the major financial organ of healthcare in Nigeria. The study aims to expand the domain of household health expenditure by analysing at national, urban and rural levels.

Design/methodology/approach

It adopted Engel curve approach, which was estimated using ordinary least squares technique. The model was structured to take care of life-cycle implications by examining effects of age in years and age groups (0-9, 10-19, 20-39, 40-59 and 60+) on healthcare spending. Data were drawn from the 2010 Harmonised Nigeria Living Standards Survey (HNLSS) conducted by the National Bureau of Statistics and analyses were conducted nationally, for urban and rural locations.

Findings

The result shows that individual characteristics like age, religion, education and household characteristics like income, size and headship commonly influence healthcare expenditure in Nigeria significantly. The household-level variables possess stronger significant effects among the rural households while marital status and employment had differential effects in both urban and rural locations. It also confirmed that Nigeria engages in intergenerational transfer of healthcare by the working population to the young and older generations.

Research limitations/implications

HNLSS was only limited to those who were sick or injured in the last two weeks preceding the survey, leaving out those whose sickness preceded the two weeks before the survey. Also, the scope of health expenditure is limited to curative care spending that exclude expenses on preventive care, rehabilitative care as well as other cost-saving services.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to examine the determinants of household health expenditure at the national, urban and rural locations.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 44 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Case study
Publication date: 26 February 2021

Stephanie Barden and Geoff Bick

The learning outcomes of this paper is as follows: to analyse the drivers, mediators and threats of commoditisation. To critically evaluate the merits of different…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes of this paper is as follows: to analyse the drivers, mediators and threats of commoditisation. To critically evaluate the merits of different marketing options that may be employed to avoid commoditisation. To critically assess the branding-focussed or customer-focussed strategies that could be used. To develop appropriate strategies for Biotronik SA to counter commoditisation in the future.

Case overview/synopsis

The case begins with the protagonist and managing director of Biotronik SA, Robbie Nel, brewing over a new industry development. One of the leading private hospital groups has sent an open invitation to medical device suppliers to tender, where the lowest-priced products will win shelf space in their cathlabs. Robbie has to decide whether to sacrifice Biotronik SA’s profit margins to win the tender or risk not being stocked in their cathlabs. Or, he must find an alternative non-price-based strategy to pursue. The medical device industry is facing increasing price pressures from various stakeholders in the device-purchasing process. The decision to purchase is no longer the responsibility of specialist physicians alone. International and local market trends indicate that the medical device industry is threatened by commoditisation. Robbie has to make a decision on changing the Biotronik SA business model and strategy in response to these macro trends.

Complexity academic level

This teaching case is aimed at postgraduate students, particularly those pursuing MBA, EMBA and Postgraduate Diploma programmes, as well as specialist masters and executive education. The students should have some work experience to comprehend and assess the case from a practical perspective.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Yasmeen Alhatmi

Globally, safety in healthcare services has become an important focus. The Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), located in the Sultanate of Oman in the Arabian Gulf…

Abstract

Purpose

Globally, safety in healthcare services has become an important focus. The Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), located in the Sultanate of Oman in the Arabian Gulf, has begun to take active steps in delivering safer healthcare services while moving towards healthcare excellence. The purpose of this paper is to show the importance of prioritizing hospital‐wide safety and discuss how it has become essentially linked to the multi‐faceted dimension of quality through acceptability, efficiency accessibility and continuity in SQUH.

Design/methodology/approach

In an effort to shift all cultural elements of SQUH staff, system and activities towards addressing the goal of safety, SQUH has brought on a safety culture by holistic and systemic approach to quality improvement. Illustrated herein is the journey of how the hospital is addressing and measuring the goal of safety as an organizational priority through values, beliefs, goals, policies and operations.

Findings

The progressive steps that SQUH initiated since 2008 which measure, assess and ultimately change the perception of safety in the hospital are described. Specific recommendations include addressing safety culture elements of communicated values and objectives and measuring them, raising the awareness and training barriers, adopting safety goals specific to hospital environment, and centralizing a monitoring system to track input, progress and closure of safety mechanisms and activities.

Originality/value

The paper presents a model for improving safety in healthcare services through the initiatives of a university hospital, implementing a measureable phase approach over a two‐year period for addressing the goal of safety.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2020

Manuel M. Dayrit and Ronald Umali Mendoza

The control of particularly virulent communicable diseases such as COVID-19 can be considered a global public good. Unabated contagion, both within and across borders, can…

Abstract

Purpose

The control of particularly virulent communicable diseases such as COVID-19 can be considered a global public good. Unabated contagion, both within and across borders, can result in a global public bad. More effective control – such as by flattening the epidemiological curve – could prevent severe social and economic disruption by allowing domestic health and social protection systems to more adequately respond to the health crisis. This article elaborates on some of the main elements of counter COVID-19 responses, drawing on emerging international good practices. While a full evaluation of policy effectiveness is still forthcoming, it is critical to review and synthesize the emerging lessons and evidence even this early.

Design/methodology/approach

This article reviews the international good practices in counter COVID-19 responses across countries.

Findings

Concerted efforts across borders, such as by sharing data and collaborating in research and by coordinating international support for countercyclical economic and health responses at the national level, are some of the options for countering COVID-19 at the international level. Within countries, more inclusive social protection and health systems, combined with countercyclical economic policies, and concerted behavioral changes tend to produce more effective collective action against the spread of the disease.

Research limitations/implications

This study is based on a review of emerging responses to the health crisis.

Practical implications

The policies and practices reviewed in this paper could feed into better-informed crisis responses to COVID-19 and other types of health shocks.

Originality/value

This study is among the first general reviews of policy responses to the COVID-19 health crisis.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 30 March 2020

Eastern EU’s handling of COVID-19 pandemic.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB251657

ISSN: 2633-304X

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Geographic
Topical
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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2020

Tessa Withorn, Joanna Messer Kimmitt, Carolyn Caffrey Gardner, Anthony Andora, Cristina Springfield, Dana Ospina, Maggie Clarke, George Martinez, Amalia Castañeda, Aric Haas and Wendolyn Vermeer

This paper aims to present recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering various library types, study populations and research contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations, reports and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2019.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description of all 370 sources and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians, researchers and anyone interested as a quick and comprehensive reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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