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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Anthony Virtue, Thierry Chaussalet and John Kelly

The purpose of this paper is to consider a number of issues around the poor adoption of healthcare simulation models and reflect whether there has been a broad failure of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider a number of issues around the poor adoption of healthcare simulation models and reflect whether there has been a broad failure of academic healthcare simulation modellers to build models that reflect real healthcare problems as acknowledged by healthcare stakeholders. This paper will also review the role of healthcare planners within the health sector and propose that they are well suited to act as change agents to improve the adoption of simulation within the sector.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviewed academic evidence around poor adoption of simulation modelling in healthcare, including differences to other sectors, its size and complexity, stakeholder issues and current and future challenges to improve operational efficiency. This paper also reviewed the role of healthcare planning and its valuable links with health stakeholders, suggesting that these links could be exploited to increase simulation modelling within the healthcare sector to improve operational efficiency.

Findings

This paper highlights the strong links between healthcare planning and the healthcare stakeholders and proposes that healthcare planning can play a key role in adoption of healthcare simulation modelling to achieve operational efficiency improvements.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates the potential link between healthcare planning and healthcare stakeholders to achieve operational improvements within the health sector.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 26 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2011

Morad Benyoucef, Craig Kuziemsky, Amir Afrasiabi Rad and Ali Elsabbahi

Service‐oriented architecture is becoming increasingly important for healthcare delivery as it assures seamless integration internally between various teams and…

Abstract

Purpose

Service‐oriented architecture is becoming increasingly important for healthcare delivery as it assures seamless integration internally between various teams and departments, and externally between healthcare organizations and their partners. In order to make healthcare more efficient and effective, we need to understand and evaluate its processes, and one way of achieving that is through process modeling. Modeling healthcare processes within a service‐oriented environment opens up new perspectives and raises challenging questions. The purpose of this paper is to investigate one of these questions, namely the suitability of web service orchestration and choreography, two closely related but fundamentally different methodologies for modeling web service‐based healthcare processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a case‐based approach that first developed a set of 12 features for modeling healthcare processes and then used the features to compare orchestration and choreography for modeling part of the scheduled workflow.

Findings

The findings show that neither methodology can, by itself, meet all healthcare modeling requirements in the context of the case study. The appropriate methodology must be selected after consideration of the specific modeling needs. The authors identified usability, capabilities, and evolution as three key considerations to assist with selection of a methodology for healthcare process modeling. Further, sometimes one method will not meet all modeling needs and hence the authors recommend combining the two methodologies in order to harness the benefits of modeling healthcare processes in a service‐oriented environment.

Originality/value

Although literature exists on process modeling of web services for healthcare, there are no criteria describing necessary features for micro‐level modeling, nor is there a comparison of the two leading service composition methodologies within the healthcare context. This paper provides some necessary formalization for process modeling in healthcare.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2010

Korina Katsaliaki and Navonil Mustafee

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the viability of using distributed simulation to execute large and complex healthcare simulation models which help government…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the viability of using distributed simulation to execute large and complex healthcare simulation models which help government take informed decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper compares the execution time of a standalone healthcare supply chain simulation with its distributed counterpart. Both the standalone and the distributed models are built using a commercial simulation package (CSP).

Findings

The results show that the execution time of the standalone healthcare supply chain simulation increases exponentially as the size and complexity of the system being modelled increases. On the other hand, using distributed simulation approach decreases the run time for large and complex models.

Research limitations/implications

The distributed approach of executing different parts of a single simulation model over different computers is only viable when the model: can be divided into logical parts and the exchange of information between these parts occurs at constant simulated time intervals; is sufficiently large and complicated, such that executing the model over a single processor is very time consuming.

Practical implications

Based on a feasibility study of the UK National Blood Service we demonstrate the effectiveness of distributed simulation and argue that it is a vital technique in healthcare informatics with respect to supporting decision making in large healthcare systems.

Originality/value

To the best of the knowledge, this is the first feasibility study in healthcare which shows the outcome of modelling and executing a distributed simulation using unmodified CSPs and a software/middleware for distributed simulation.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Masoud Fakhimi and Jane Probert

The purpose of this paper is to identify the existing literature on the wide range of operations research (OR) studies applied to healthcare, and to classify studies based…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the existing literature on the wide range of operations research (OR) studies applied to healthcare, and to classify studies based on application type and on the OR technique employed. The scope of the review is limited to studies which have been undertaken in the UK, and to papers published since the year 2000.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 142 high‐quality journal and conference papers have been identified from ISI Web of Knowledge data base for review and analysis.

Findings

The findings categorise the OR techniques employed, and analyse the application type, publication trends, funding, and software packages used in the twenty‐first century in UK healthcare. Publication trends indicate an increasing use of OR techniques in UK healthcare. The findings show that, interestingly, the distribution of the OR techniques employed is not uniform; the majority of studies focus on simulation, either as the only technique employed or as one element of a multi‐method approach.

Originality/value

Several studies have focused on the use of simulation in healthcare modelling, but none has methodologically reviewed the use of the full range of OR techniques. This research is likely to benefit healthcare decision makers since it will provide them with an overview of the different studies that have utilised multiple OR techniques for investigating problems in the stated domain.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 26 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2017

Adem Karahoca, Dilek Karahoca and Merve Aksöz

The purpose of the study is to investigate critical factors affecting individuals’ intention to adopt internet of things (IoT) products in healthcare.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to investigate critical factors affecting individuals’ intention to adopt internet of things (IoT) products in healthcare.

Design/methodology/approach

An integrated model was developed based on technology acceptance model (TAM), innovation diffusion theory (IDT), technological innovativeness (TI), protection motivation theory and privacy calculus theory. The model was tested with 426 respondents (222 females, 204 males) using partial least square structural equation model with all data grouped by gender.

Findings

Based on the results of the complete model, perceived advantage (PA), image and perceived ease of use (PEOU) constructs have a significant effect on intention to adopt IoT healthcare technology products. The results show that for females, compatibility and trialability have more impact on PEOU whereas for males PA has more impact on PEOU. Image, perceived privacy risk, perceived vulnerability have more impact on males when compared to females.

Research limitations/implications

Research conducted only among Turkish people.

Originality/value

This study investigated adoption of future technology, “internet of things”, products in healthcare from a behavioral perspective by integrating various theories. The reason is that before launching any technology into the market, its facilitative factors should be researched for the people who are going to use this in their daily routine.

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2020

Berhanu Endeshaw

The purpose of this study was to review existing healthcare service quality-measurement models.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to review existing healthcare service quality-measurement models.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the literature was conducted utilizing keywords “healthcare’’, “service quality’’, “measurement models”, “SERVQUAL”, “SERVPERF”, “HEALTHQUAL”, “PubHosQual” and “HospitalQual”. These investigations were selected from the “Emerald’’, “ABI/Inform”, “ScienceDirect” and “EBSCOhost” databases. A range of studies used in the makeup of the healthcare quality-measurement model for a 36 years period (1979 to 2015) were examined in an exhaustive survey of the literature. Of 137 studies reviewed, 74 studies were selected for analysis.

Findings

As yet, no consensus has been reached among scholars on the definition and indicators and factors of the quality of the healthcare services. Moreover, most of the current models are of Western origin and incongruent with the cultural and economic contexts of developing countries. The previous studies create scales resembling the generic measures of service quality, which may not be completely appropriate for assessing the perceived quality of healthcare services. Furthermore, previous studies were too narrow, overemphasizing the quality of healthcare only as far as the functional aspect of the services were concerned and paying too little attention to the technical aspects, using the experience of healthcare providers. These results have much room for failures. This is therefore advising healthcare organizations that need to develop their own models for measuring the quality of their services.

Originality/value

Generic models no longer suffice in measuring the quality of healthcare services. Developing countries should try and develop their own models for measuring the quality of healthcare services.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2009

Masood A. Badri, Samaa Attia and Abdulla M. Ustadi

The purpose of this article is to present a comprehensive structural equation based service quality and patient satisfaction model taking into account the patient's…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to present a comprehensive structural equation based service quality and patient satisfaction model taking into account the patient's condition before and after discharge. The authors aim to test for causality in a sample of patients from United Arab Emirates public hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using questionnaires completed by adults discharged (n=244) from UAE public hospitals. The proposed model consists of five main constructs. Three represent service quality: quality of care (four variables); process and administration (four variables) and information (four variables). There is also one construct that represents patient's status (two variables – health status before admission and after discharge). Finally, there is one construct that represents patient's satisfaction with care (two variables – general and relative satisfaction). Structural equation modeling and LISREL using maximum likelihood estimation was used to test hypothesized model(s)/parameters(s) derived deductively from the literature.

Findings

The structural equation modeling representation provides a comprehensive picture that allows healthcare constructs and patient satisfaction causality to be tested. The goodness‐of‐fit statistics supported the healthcare quality‐patient status‐satisfaction model.

Originality/value

The model has been found to capture attributes that characterize healthcare quality in a developing country and could represent other modern healthcare systems. Also, it can be used to evaluate other healthcare practices from patients' viewpoints. The study highlights the importance of healthcare quality as patient satisfaction predictors by capturing other effects such as patient status.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2018

Mona Jami Pour and Seyed Mohammadbagher Jafari

The advent of new technologies and change of patients’ behavioral patterns have triggered the provision of medical services through social media. Although the intersection…

Abstract

Purpose

The advent of new technologies and change of patients’ behavioral patterns have triggered the provision of medical services through social media. Although the intersection between social media and health has received considerable research attention, there is little research on how health institutions implement social media strategy; thus a roadmap is required to navigate these technological initiatives. So, the purpose of this paper is to overcome this challenge by developing the Health 2.0 maturity model in the healthcare field.

Design/methodology/approach

To obtain this aim, the mixed method was applied in this research. In the first step, qualitative research method was used. In this step, along with comprehensive literature review, semi-structured interviews were conducted with the healthcare professionals to find the practices and capabilities of Health 2.0. In the second step, the proposed key dimensions (KD) were assessed and prioritized based on the views of the healthcare professionals using the quantitative survey method. Finally, by considering the architecture of Health 2.0 maturity model, the KDs were assigned to maturity levels based on their priority of implementation using a focus group.

Findings

The proposed maturity model is composed of six KDs and five maturity levels based on the Capability Maturity Model Integration architecture. The KDs, as well as their implementation order and weights in the proposed maturity model are presented as a roadmap for applying Health 2.0 effectively.

Practical implications

Employing the Health 2.0 maturity model enables health institutions to assess the current social media capabilities and guide them to select appropriate strategies for progress. Due to the descriptive nature of the proposed model, it allows managers to conduct process-based assessments regarding health 2.0 implementation.

Originality/value

Health 2.0 has been a recurring theme on the agenda of healthcare institutions, but no sensitive tool is available to measure its growth processes. This paper explores the much ignored but critically important subject of Health 2.0 maturity model and its implementation roadmap. The main contribution of this paper is to introduce an integrated roadmap containing the most important capabilities of Health 2.0. The proposed model is both descriptive and prescriptive in nature, and has a significant theoretical contribution to healthcare studies. This paper provides a mechanism to benchmark Health 2.0 efforts and to develop a progressive strategy that would improve its activities.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Sik Sumaedi, Medi Yarmen and I. Gede Mahatma Yuda Bakti

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a multi-level healthcare service quality (HSQ) model in Jakarta, Indonesia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a multi-level healthcare service quality (HSQ) model in Jakarta, Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

The research used a quantitative research method. Data were collected via a survey with questionnaire. The respondents are 154 patients of a healthcare institution in Jakarta, Indonesia.

Findings

The research result shows a multi-level HSQ model. The HSQ model consists of three primary dimensions, namely, healthcare service outcome, healthcare service interaction, and healthcare service environment. Healthcare service outcome has three subdimensions, i.e. waiting time, medicine, and effectiveness. Healthcare service interaction has three dimensions, namely, soft interaction, medical personnel expertise, and hard interaction. Healthcare service environment has two dimensions, which are equipment condition and ambient condition.

Research limitations/implications

This research was only conducted in one healthcare institution in Jakarta, Indonesia. The data collection using convenience sampling method as well as the use of small sample size caused the limitation of the research results in representing across the customer of the healthcare institution. This study can be replicated with larger sample size and involving more healthcare institutions in order to examine the stability of the HSQ model.

Practical implications

Healthcare institution’s managers can use the HSQ model to monitor, measure, and improve their service quality.

Originality/value

There is a lack of research that develops and tests HSQ model based on multi-level approach in the context of developing country. This paper has fulfilled the gap.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 65 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Book part
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Stuart Winby, Christopher G. Worley and Terry L. Martinson

This chapter integrates organization design and sustainability concepts to describe an accelerated transformational change at the Fairview Medical Group (United States).

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter integrates organization design and sustainability concepts to describe an accelerated transformational change at the Fairview Medical Group (United States).

Design/methodology/approach

A case study of the transformation at Fairview Medical Group’s primary care clinics was developed from interviews and first-person accounts of the change. Objective data regarding outcomes was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the redesign process.

Findings

The Fairview Medical Group developed an innovation and change capability to transform 35 primary care clinics in six months. All of the clinics were certified by the state of Minnesota as complying with their healthcare standards. Clinical outcomes, costs, and employee and physician engagement also increased. All of the improved measures are sustained.

Originality/value

Healthcare reform in the United States struggles because the organization design challenges are great and the change difficulties even greater. Fairview’s experience provides important evidence and lessons that can help advance our understanding of effective healthcare and create more sustainable healthcare systems. This chapter provides healthcare system administrators evidence and alternatives in the pursuit of implementation.

Details

Reconfiguring the Ecosystem for Sustainable Healthcare
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-035-3

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