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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Sara Emamgholipour Sefiddashti, Ali Kazemi Karyani and Sadegh Ghazanfari

Accessing adequate healthcare to all people is one of the main goals of the health sector. The purpose of this paper is to investigate healthcare services access…

Abstract

Purpose

Accessing adequate healthcare to all people is one of the main goals of the health sector. The purpose of this paper is to investigate healthcare services access development of the provinces in Iran during 2007 and 2013.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. The study population included all the provinces in Iran. The data for 13 variables, including physical and human health resources, was collected from the Ministry of Health and Medical Education and the Statistics Center of Iran. Taxonomy technique was used to determine the degree of healthcare services access development in the provinces.

Findings

The findings show that Semnan was the province with the most developed healthcare services access with development score of 0.342 while Sistan Balocehstan province was the least developed with development score of one in 2007. In the year 2013, Chahar-Mahal Bakhtiari and Sistan Baluchestan were the least and most developed provinces with scores of 0.551 and 0.989, respectively. The mean and standard deviation of the development scores in access to healthcare services in 2007 and 2013 were 0.7463±0.1268 and 0.7766±0.1058, respectively.

Originality/value

Most previous studies that examined disparities in access to healthcare resources in Iran only considered one resource. This study applied a taxonomy technique to investigate the disparity and changes in access using 13 main healthcare resources. This approach helped the authors to investigate whether the decisions of the policy makers were intended to eliminate the disparities.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Ann Scheck McAlearney

Increased attention to improve patient safety in healthcare has challenged healthcare managers to consider innovative approaches to meet this need. Organizational…

Abstract

Increased attention to improve patient safety in healthcare has challenged healthcare managers to consider innovative approaches to meet this need. Organizational development (OD) programs have been used in both health services and other industries to address organizational training and development requirements, and can provide focused, timely, and effective education and training to a broad spectrum of program participants. In healthcare organizations, OD programs can serve an important institutional function by providing a framework through which patient safety can be emphasized as an organizational priority, and patient safety training can be delivered as part of OD efforts. In addition, organizations committed to creating a patient-focused safety culture can use OD initiatives strategically to support organizational culture change efforts. This chapter describes different approaches to including patient safety in an OD framework, drawing from both management theory and practice. Findings from three extensive qualitative studies of leadership development and corporate universities in healthcare provide specific examples of how healthcare organizations discuss patient safety improvement using this alternative approach. Considering the concepts and findings described in this chapter can help healthcare organizations make strides toward positive changes in organizational culture that will promote patient safety on the organizational agenda.

Details

Patient Safety and Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-955-5

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Santanu Mandal

This paper aims to explore the influence of dimensions of organizational culture, namely, development culture, group culture, rational culture and hierarchical culture, on…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the influence of dimensions of organizational culture, namely, development culture, group culture, rational culture and hierarchical culture, on healthcare supply chain resilience (HCRES). Further, the study explored the moderating role of technology orientation on organizational culture dimensions and healthcare resilience linkages.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a multi-unit study of different hospital supply chains (SCs). Consequently, perceptual data were gathered from seven dominant entities in a typical medical/hospital SC: hospitals, hotels, chemistry and pharmaceutical, marketing/public relations/promotion, medical equipment manufacturers and surgical suppliers, food and beverage providers (i.e. restaurants) and insurance providers. The responses were gathered using online survey and were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Based on 276 completed responses, positive influences were found for development, group and rational cultures on HCRES. As expected, a negative influence of hierarchical culture was found on HCRES. Further, technological orientation was found to enhance the positive effects of development, group and rational cultures on HCRES. However, no prominent moderation was noted for hierarchical culture’s influence on HCRES. The findings suggested managers to focus more on developing competing values framework (CVF)-based dimensions of organizational culture dimensions for effective risk mitigation so as to provide healthcare services in a timely manner to patients.

Originality/value

The study is the first to investigate the effects of organizational culture’s dimensions on resilience. The study has empirically established the association between CVF view and dynamic capabilities. The study underlined the importance of resilience in healthcare SCs. Resilience is an important dynamic capability in healthcare SCs to provide uninterrupted treatments and services to patients. Any failure in such a service can be fatal. Further, the study developed the measures of development, group, rational and hierarchical culture for further investigation in healthcare. This study is also the first to develop a measure for resilience in the healthcare sector.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2018

Anne Koskiniemi, Hanna Vakkala and Ville Pietiläinen

The purpose of this study is to take an existential-phenomenological perspective to understand and describe the experienced leader identity development of healthcare

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to take an existential-phenomenological perspective to understand and describe the experienced leader identity development of healthcare leaders working in dual roles. Leader identity development under the influence of strong professional identities of nurses and doctors has remained an under-researched phenomenon to which the study contributes.

Design/methodology/approach

Existential-phenomenology serves as a perspective underpinning the whole research, and an existential-phenomenological method is applied in the interview data analysis.

Findings

The study showed leader identity development in healthcare to be most strongly influenced and affected by clinical work and its meanings and followers’ needs and leader–follower relationships. In addition, four other key categories were presented as meaningful in leader identity development; leader identity development is an ongoing process occurring in relations of the key categories.

Originality/value

The existential-phenomenological approach and analysis method offer a novel way to understand leader identity development and work identities as experienced.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2019

Rocío Rodríguez, Göran Svensson and Carmen Otero-Neira

The purpose of this paper is to assess the future direction of sustainable development in the healthcare industry. This study aims to reveal general similarities and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the future direction of sustainable development in the healthcare industry. This study aims to reveal general similarities and specific differences between private hospitals and enabler or hinders of sustainable development.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an inductive approach, judgmental sampling was applied to select relevant healthcare organizations. Informants were identified according to their knowledge of their organizations’ sustainability initiatives.

Findings

In the context the homogeneity that could be expected, the studied hospitals range from having a very strong organizational conviction as to the future direction of sustainable development to a very weak one. There are some general similarities and specific differences between them reported.

Research limitations/implications

There is no common formula applicable across private hospitals to determine the future direction of their sustainable development. Although hospitals benchmark best practices, others use them only as a general frame of reference. This scenario offers opportunities for further research.

Practical implications

The economic, social and environmental sustainable development across private hospitals may evolve from general principles or guidelines, but the specific sustainable development at each hospital may well evolve along tailored economic, social and environmental actions.

Originality/value

Developing a framework considering similarities and differences between the sustainability actions of each hospital in the healthcare industry is important for understanding future directions. This study provides insights into factors that could enable success or constitute hinders of sustainable development. They can also guide the industry toward a common objective which improves the hospitals sustainability actions in the future, also minimizing the effort required.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Svante Lifvergren, Peter Docherty and Abraham B. (Rami) Shani

This chapter examines the developmental journey toward a sustainable healthcare system in the west of Skaraborg County in Sweden from 2000 to 2010. It tracks a stream of…

Abstract

This chapter examines the developmental journey toward a sustainable healthcare system in the west of Skaraborg County in Sweden from 2000 to 2010. It tracks a stream of collaborative research projects within the context of the Swedish sustainability debate that were focused on achieving improved care quality, patient safety, efficiency, and efficacy. The case reports how a central government directive to integrate healthcare at the local level – the county – led to the establishment of a development coalition management group that designed and managed the transformation via broad participation and engagement mechanisms. The transformation process toward a more sustainable healthcare system raises theoretical and practical questions about sustainable effectiveness, the role of partizcipation and learning mechanisms such as democratic dialogue conferences in sustainable effectiveness, the tension between planned and emergent change processes, and the challenge of integration in the drive toward a sustainable healthcare system.

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

JENNIFER MACDOUGALL, J. MICHAEL BRITTAIN and ROBERT GANN

This paper provides an overview of the range and development of health informatics, with examples from the literature world wide covering the types of information…

Abstract

This paper provides an overview of the range and development of health informatics, with examples from the literature world wide covering the types of information involved, the areas of application, the impact of evidence based medicine and other professional issues, integrated information systems, and the needs of the public, patients and their carers. While medical informatics certainly comprises a major part of health informatics it is not the main focus of this paper. Medical informatics is the older term and involves the use of information technology and computing specifically for medical science research, and the diagnosis and treatment of disease involving, for example, X‐rays, imaging, resonance, and magnetic scanning techniques. Rather, the scope of this review is the literature relating to the wider concept of the management of information through the interdisciplinary application of information science and technology for the benefit of patients, scientists, managers, staff, and carers involved in the whole range of healthcare activity.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 52 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2009

Peter Hockey, Alexandra Tobin, Juliette Kemp, Janet Kerrigan, Fleur Kitsell, Penny Green, Amanda Sewell, Christopher Smith, Stephanie Stanwick and Peter Lees

The purpose of this paper is to describe a novel approach to leadership development for UK healthcare workers, while contributing to health service improvement in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a novel approach to leadership development for UK healthcare workers, while contributing to health service improvement in a developing country.

Design/methodology/approach

A quality improvement faculty are used to teach and mentor National Health Service (NHS) International Development Clinical Fellows in quality improvement (QI) methods. Using accepted QI methods, sensitive and practical improvement projects are selected in partnership with local people in Cambodia in order to start achieving United Nations Millennium Development Goals related to child and maternal health. Simultaneously, NHS International Fellows gain an unparalleled opportunity to develop their leadership skills, which should benefit the NHS on their return to the UK.

Findings

Healthcare quality improvement methods, developed in First World countries, are transferable to the developing world and also function as a vehicle for developing leadership skills in experienced healthcare workers.

Practical implications

This leadership development programme fits with the stated aims of the Global Health Partnerships report, which encourages the NHS to play a global role in healthcare development in the developing world. Other First World healthcare systems could adopt this leadership development method to both improve the leadership capability of their own staff while also making a significant contribution to less well‐developed healthcare systems.

Originality/value

The combination of leadership development through quality improvement is novel – promising to benefit both providers and recipients.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Tapani Jorma, Hanna Tiirinki, Risto Bloigu and Leena Turkki

The purpose of this study is to evaluate how LEAN thinking is used as a management and development tool in the Finnish public healthcare system and what kind of outcomes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate how LEAN thinking is used as a management and development tool in the Finnish public healthcare system and what kind of outcomes have been achieved or expected by using it. The main focus is in managing and developing patient and treatment processes.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-method approach incorporating the Webropol survey was used.

Findings

LEAN is quite a new concept in Finnish public healthcare. It is mainly used as a development tool to seek financial savings and to improve the efficiency of patient processes, but has not yet been deeply implemented. However, the experiences from LEAN initiatives have been positive, and the methodology is already quite well-known. It can be concluded that, because of positive experiences from LEAN, the environment in Finnish healthcare is ready for the deeper implementation of LEAN.

Originality/value

This paper evaluates the usage of LEAN thinking for the first time in the public healthcare system of Finland as a development tool and a management system. It highlights the implementation and achieved results of LEAN thinking when used in the healthcare environment. It also highlights the expectations for LEAN thinking in Finnish public healthcare.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Tony Huzzard, Andreas Hellström, Svante Lifvergren and Nils Conradi

This chapter presents a framework for an action research based intervention to develop and transform sustainable healthcare in a regional context. The framework is…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter presents a framework for an action research based intervention to develop and transform sustainable healthcare in a regional context. The framework is illustrated by the case of the Regional Cancer Centre (RCC) West in western Sweden.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework draws upon and develops Pettigrew’s context–content–process model of strategic change and applies it to the unfolding narrative of the change effort. The empirical focus is the activities of a learning platform consisting of the RCC leadership, senior cancer physicians designated as process owners and an action research team. Data were collected from documents, observations of the learning platform, notes from meetings and interviews. Outcome data were obtained via the self-reporting of the physicians.

Findings

The learning platform established the capability for wide ranging development and quality improvement on the 23 cancer pathways as well as some support activities around principles of patient-centred care. A clear result is greater inter-organisational collaboration between care professionals as well as the introduction of new medicines, clinical methods, joint learning activities and new forms of measurement and monitoring of care practices. All of the improved measures are sustained.

Originality/value

Whilst there is no shortage of rhetoric on patient-centred care, the reality is that in complex healthcare systems solutions such as process-oriented approaches often fail. This case presents a model and an approach that eschews clear visions for change and instead places an emphasis on dialogue, participation, professional autonomy and collaborative communities as means for achieving the patient-centred ideal. The case also shows the value of seeing sustainable health systems as being grounded on practitioner–scholar collaboration that combines practical knowing with scientific knowledge.

Details

Reconfiguring the Ecosystem for Sustainable Healthcare
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-035-3

Keywords

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