Search results

1 – 10 of over 25000
Article
Publication date: 19 April 2013

Mahtab Ahmad

The purpose of this paper is to assess disabled persons' access to health care, and highlight barriers.

1216

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess disabled persons' access to health care, and highlight barriers.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 245 rural men and women with physical disabilities were interviewed, to determine their level of access to healthcare services. A simple composite mean of the weighted average indices of responses on the effectiveness of healthcare provision, equity, and users' satisfaction was calculated, to assess the overall level of access of the respondents to healthcare. The qualitative component highlighted an array of barriers that prevented the disabled individuals from accessing healthcare services.

Findings

The results indicated that access to the so‐called “inclusive” public healthcare for both males and females with physical disabilities was poor. The barriers identified were related to the built environments, healthcare delivery processes, and ceiling of health subsidies. The findings suggest that the absence of advocacy of disability rights and failure to adopt circumstantial equities at dispensing levels have resulted in the collapse of the promotion of disability rights at grassroots levels.

Research limitations/implications

The study is location specific (rural), and it mainly focuses on individuals with physical disabilities in working‐age (15‐35 years) to assess their access to the rural healthcare.

Originality/value

Having an effective healthcare provision in an area and its equal access to both males and females is crucially important for their social and economic development. In this paper, the assessment of access to healthcare provides both an aggregated and a disaggregated picture by gender, which is poor for individuals with physical disabilities.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 33 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Theresa Alfaro-Velcamp

Asylum seekers, refugees and immigrants’ access to healthcare vary in South Africa and Cape Town due to unclear legal status. The purpose of this paper is to shed light on…

4024

Abstract

Purpose

Asylum seekers, refugees and immigrants’ access to healthcare vary in South Africa and Cape Town due to unclear legal status. The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the source of this variation, the divergence between the 1996 South African Constitution, the immigration laws, and regulations and to describe its harmful consequences.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on legal and ethnographic research, this paper documents the disjuncture between South African statutes and regulations and the South African Constitution regarding refugees and migrants’ access to healthcare. Research involved examining South African jurisprudence, the African Charter, and United Nations’ materials regarding rights to health and health care access, and speaking with civil society organizations and healthcare providers. These sources inform the description of the immigrant access to healthcare in Cape Town, South Africa.

Findings

Asylum-seekers and refugees are entitled to health and emergency care; however, hospital administrators require documentation (up-to-date permits) before care can be administered. Many immigrants – especially the undocumented – are often unable to obtain care because of a lack of papers or because of “progressive realization,” the notion that the state cannot presently afford to provide treatment in accordance with constitutional rights. These explanations have put healthcare providers in an untenable position of not being able to treat patients, including some who face fatal conditions.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited by the fact that South African courts have not adjudicated a direct challenge to being refused care at healthcare facility on the basis of legal status. This limits the ability to know how rights afforded to “everyone” within the South African Constitution will be interpreted with respect to immigrants seeking healthcare. The research is also limited by the non-circulation of healthcare admissions policies among leading facilities in the Cape Town region where the case study is based.

Practical implications

Articulation of the disjuncture between the South African Constitution and the immigration laws and regulations allows stakeholders and decision-makers to reframe provincial and municipal policies about healthcare access in terms of constitutional rights and the practical limitations accommodated through progressive realization.

Social implications

In South Africa, immigration statutes and regulations are inconsistent and deemed unconstitutional with respect to the treatment of undocumented migrants. Hospital administrators are narrowly interpreting the laws to instruct healthcare providers on how to treat patients and whom they can treat. These practices need to stop. Access to healthcare must be structured to comport with the constitutional right afforded to everyone, and with progressive realization pursued through a non – discriminatory policy regarding vulnerable immigrants.

Originality/value

This paper presents a unique case study that combines legal and social science methods to explore a common and acute question of health care access. The case is novel and instructive insofar as South Africa has not established refugee camps in response to rising numbers of refugees, asylum seekers and immigrants. South Africans thus confront a “first world” question of equitable access to healthcare within their African context and with limited resources in a climate of increasing xenophobia.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Jaclyn M. White Hughto, Kirsty A. Clark, Frederick L. Altice, Sari L. Reisner, Trace S. Kershaw and John E. Pachankis

Incarcerated transgender women often require healthcare to meet their physical-, mental-, and gender transition-related health needs; however, their healthcare experiences…

Abstract

Purpose

Incarcerated transgender women often require healthcare to meet their physical-, mental-, and gender transition-related health needs; however, their healthcare experiences in prisons and jails and interactions with correctional healthcare providers are understudied. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In 2015, 20 transgender women who had been incarcerated in the USA within the past five years participated in semi-structured interviews about their healthcare experiences while incarcerated.

Findings

Participants described an institutional culture in which their feminine identity was not recognized and the ways in which institutional policies acted as a form of structural stigma that created and reinforced the gender binary and restricted access to healthcare. While some participants attributed healthcare barriers to providers’ transgender bias, others attributed barriers to providers’ limited knowledge or inexperience caring for transgender patients. Whether due to institutional (e.g. sex-segregated prisons, biased culture) or interpersonal factors (e.g. biased or inexperienced providers), insufficient access to physical-, mental-, and gender transition-related healthcare negatively impacted participants’ health while incarcerated.

Research limitations/implications

Findings highlight the need for interventions that target multi-level barriers to care in order to improve incarcerated transgender women’s access to quality, gender-affirmative healthcare.

Originality/value

This study provides first-hand accounts of how multi-level forces serve to reinforce the gender binary and negatively impact the health of incarcerated transgender women. Findings also describe incarcerated transgender women’s acts of resistance against institutional and interpersonal efforts to maintain the gender binary and present participant-derived recommendations to improve access to gender affirmative healthcare for incarcerated transgender women.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Boonsom Namsomboon and Kyoko Kusakabe

The purpose of this paper is to examine women homeworkers' access to healthcare services in Thailand. Specifically, it focuses on how the state's universal healthcare

919

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine women homeworkers' access to healthcare services in Thailand. Specifically, it focuses on how the state's universal healthcare service, introduced in the year 2002, has responded/not responded to the needs of poor women homeworkers in Bangkok.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection was done through a structured questionnaire with 415 women homeworkers from 16 districts in Bangkok, Thailand, ten in‐depth interviews and 13 group discussions.

Findings

It was found that less than half of the women homeworker respondents accessed the universal healthcare scheme. The obstacles for access include both financial (transportation cost, loss of wage) and time. Also, homeworkers need support from the community/household to access these services. Universal health services itself is not enough to ensure access to healthcare service, especially among poor and minimally educated homeworkers with small children.

Practical implications

The research showed the need to have multiple approaches (state‐provided services and community organizing, as well as awareness among men about their role in care work), in order to ensure universal healthcare coverage.

Originality/value

Universal healthcare services are considered the best way to extend healthcare services to workers in the informal economy. This paper argues that total dependence on state‐provided services does not ensure universal healthcare coverage. There is a need for additional community‐based support mechanisms to ensure access to these services.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 31 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Christalla Pithara, Michalinos Zembylas and Mamas Theodorou

This paper aims to discuss factors affecting temporary migrants' ability to access and make effective use of public and private healthcare services in the Republic of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss factors affecting temporary migrants' ability to access and make effective use of public and private healthcare services in the Republic of Cyprus (hereafter referred to as Cyprus). These factors are raised in the context of a larger study focusing on the healthcare needs of temporary migrants from non‐EU countries living and working in Cyprus.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi‐structured interviews with 13 domestic workers and 17 students from Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Bangladesh, India and the Philippines explored migrants' experiences with accessing and utilizing healthcare services in Cyprus. The theoretical framework utilized is grounded in the health capability approach which focuses on individuals' confidence and ability to be effective in achieving optimal health.

Findings

The study highlights issues concerning the accessibility and acceptability of healthcare services which emerge as the result of both the organisation and delivery of healthcare services and social, political and economic structures.

Research limitations/implications

The implications of this study are relevant in the current debate taking place at the EU level about the opportunities and challenges of temporary migration. Specifically, it is argued that governments and societies should promote individual freedoms and opportunities that empower people to lead the lives they want to live.

Originality/value

Temporary migrants form a group whose experiences and needs have not been as extensively investigated as those of other migrant groups, particularly in Cyprus. The capability approach allows for assessing both policy and health systems taking into consideration equity and the impact of multi‐sectoral influences on health.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2019

Terrylyna Baffoe-Bonnie, Samuel Kojo Ntow, Kwasi Awuah-Werekoh and Augustine Adomah-Afari

The purpose of this paper is to explore the influence of health system factors on access to a quality healthcare among prisoners in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the influence of health system factors on access to a quality healthcare among prisoners in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered using different qualitative methods (interviews and participant observation) with staff of the James Camp Prison, Accra. Findings were analyzed using a framework method for the thematic analysis of the semi-structured interview data; and interpreted with the theoretical perspective of health systems thinking and innovation.

Findings

The study concludes that health system factors such as inadequate funding for health services, lack of skilled personnel and a paucity of essential medical supplies and drugs negatively affected the quality of healthcare provided to inmates.

Research limitations/implications

The limited facilities available and the sample size (healthcare workers and prison administrators) impeded the achievement of varied views on the topic.

Practical implications

The paper recommends the need for health policy makers and authorities of the Ghana Prison Service to collaborate and coordinate in a unified way to undertake policy analysis in an effort to reform the prisons healthcare system.

Social implications

The national health insurance scheme was found to be the financing option for prisoners’ access to free healthcare with supplementation from the Ghana Prison Service. The study recommends that policy makers and healthcare stakeholders should understand and appreciate the reality that the provision of a quality healthcare for prisoners is part of the entire system of healthcare service delivery in Ghana and as such should be given the needed attention.

Originality/value

This is one of few studies conducted on male only prisoners/prison in the context of Ghana. It recommends the need for an integrated approach to ensure that the entire healthcare system achieves set objectives in response to the primary healthcare concept.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2018

Danielle da Costa Leite Borges and Caterina Francesca Guidi

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the levels of access to healthcare available to undocumented migrants in the Italian and British health systems through a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the levels of access to healthcare available to undocumented migrants in the Italian and British health systems through a comparative analysis of health policies for this population in these two national health systems.

Design/methodology/approach

It builds on textual and legal analysis to explore the different meanings that the principle of universal access to healthcare might have according to literature and legal documents in the field, especially those from the human rights domain. Then, the concept of universal access, in theory, is contrasted with actual health policies in each of the selected countries to establish its meaning in practice and according to the social context. The analysis relies on policy papers, data on health expenditure, legal statutes and administrative regulations and is informed by one research question: What background conditions better explain more universal and comprehensive health systems for undocumented migrants?

Findings

By answering this research question the paper concludes that the Italian health system is more comprehensive than the British health system insofar it guarantees access free of charge to different levels of care, including primary, emergency, preventive and maternity care, while the rule in the British health system is the recovering of charges for the provision of services, with few exceptions. One possible legal explanation for the differences in access between Italy and UK is the fact that the right to health is not recognised as a fundamental constitutional right in the latter as it is in the former.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to ongoing debates on Universal Health Coverage and migration, and dialogues with recent discussions on social justice and welfare state typologies.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 January 2021

Thespina J. Yamanis, Ana María del Río-González, Laura Rapoport, Christopher Norton, Cristiana Little, Suyanna Linhales Barker and India J. Ornelas

Purpose: Fear of deportation and its relationship to healthcare access has been less studied among immigrant Latinx men who have sex with men (MSM), a population at risk…

Abstract

Purpose: Fear of deportation and its relationship to healthcare access has been less studied among immigrant Latinx men who have sex with men (MSM), a population at risk for HIV and characterized by their multiple minority statuses. The first step is to accurately measure their fear of deportation.

Approach: We used an exploratory sequential mixed methods design. Eligibility criteria were that research participants be ages 18–34 years; Latinx; cisgender male; having had sex with another male; residing in the District of Columbia metro area; and not a US citizen or legal permanent resident. In Study 1, we used in-depth interviews and thematic analysis. Using participants' interview responses, we inductively generated 15 items for a fear of deportation scale. In Study 2, we used survey data to assess the scale's psychometric properties. We conducted independent samples t-test on the associations between scale scores and barriers to healthcare access.

Findings: For the 20 participants in Study 1, fear of deportation resulted in chronic anxiety. Participants managed their fear through vigilance, and behaviors restricting their movement and social network engagement. In Study 2, we used data from 86 mostly undocumented participants. The scale was internally consistent (α = 0.89) and had a single factor. Those with higher fear of deportation scores were significantly more likely to report avoiding healthcare because they were worried about their immigration status (p = 0.007).

Originality: We described how fear of deportation limits healthcare access for immigrant Latinx MSM.

Research implications: Future research should examine fear of deportation and HIV risk among immigrant Latinx MSM.

Details

Sexual and Gender Minority Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-147-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 October 2018

Sanjana Arora, Astrid Bergland, Melanie Straiton, Bernd Rechel and Jonas Debesay

The purpose of this paper is to synthesise data from the existent literature on the experiences of non-western older migrants in Europe in accessing and using healthcare services.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to synthesise data from the existent literature on the experiences of non-western older migrants in Europe in accessing and using healthcare services.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 1,606 records were reviewed and 12 studies were selected. A thematic synthesis using Thomas and Harden’s approach was conducted.

Findings

The findings resulted in the three overarching themes: traditional discourses under new circumstances; predisposed vulnerabilities of older migrants and the healthcare system; and the conceptualization of health and the roles of healthcare professionals. The authors found that older migrants’ experience of accessing healthcare is influenced by many factors, such as health literacy, differences in healthcare beliefs and language barriers, and is not limited to cultural and traditional discourses of care. Findings reveal that there is a limited body of knowledge on barriers experienced by older migrant women.

Research limitations/implications

The geographical scope of the study and subsequent type of healthcare systems should be taken into account while understanding barriers to care. Another limitation is that although we studied different migrant groups, the authors synthesised barriers experienced by all. Future research could study migrants as separate groups to better understand how previous experiences with healthcare in their home country and specific social, cultural and economic circumstances shape them.

Originality/value

This paper provides a synthesis of the experiences of migrants from non-western countries who moved to a host country with a very different language, culture and healthcare system.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 December 2015

Pegah Memarpour, Rose Ricciardelli and Pauline Maasarjian

Canadian literature on federal correctional institutions and prison living indicate a shortage inadequate and available healthcare services to meet the needs of the prison…

Abstract

Purpose

Canadian literature on federal correctional institutions and prison living indicate a shortage inadequate and available healthcare services to meet the needs of the prison population, despite prisoners higher rates of health challenges (e.g. mental health, addictions, HIV/AIDS) in comparison to the general population. With fewer resources, concerns arise about the delivery, quantity, and quality of penal healthcare provision. Thus, the authors examines former prisoners’ experiences of, in comparison to government reports on, wait-times, and request processes for healthcare services, as well as issues of access, quality of interactions with healthcare professionals and the regulations and policies governing healthcare provision. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors compare data gathered from interviews with 56 former-federal prisoners with publicly available Correctional Services Canada reports on healthcare delivery, staff-prisoner interactions, programmes and services, and overall physical and mental health to identify consistencies and inconsistencies between the government’s and former prisoners’ understandings of penal healthcare.

Findings

Discrepancies exist between prisoners reported experiences of healthcare provision and government reports. Prisoners are dissatisfied with healthcare provision in more secure facilities or when they feel their healthcare needs are not met yet become more satisfied in less secure institutions or when their needs are eventually met.

Originality/value

Theories of administrative control frame the analyses, including discrepancies between parolee experiences and Correctional Service Canada reports. Policy recommendations to improve healthcare provision are highlighted.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 25000