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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2018

Nina Tamminen, Pia Solin, Lasse Kannas, Hannu Linturi, Eija Stengård and Tarja Kettunen

Effective public mental health policy and practice call for a trained workforce that is competent in mental health promotion and delivering on improved mental health

Abstract

Purpose

Effective public mental health policy and practice call for a trained workforce that is competent in mental health promotion and delivering on improved mental health. Systematic information on what competencies are needed for mental health promotion practice in the health sector is lacking. The purpose of this paper is to investigate these competencies for mental health promotion.

Design/methodology/approach

A Delphi survey was carried out to facilitate a consensus-building process on development of the competencies. Professionals (n=32) working in mental health and mental health promotion took part in the survey. The experts were asked their professional views on the needed competencies as well as to rank the importance of the competencies. Two questionnaire rounds were carried out in order to reach consensus.

Findings

In total, 16 main competencies and 56 subcompetencies were identified through the Delphi survey. The competencies were divided into three category domains: theoretical knowledge, practical skills and attitudes and values each category representing an important aspect of mental health promotion competency.

Practical implications

The competencies provide a resource for workforce development, as they illustrate what theoretical knowledge, practical skills and attitudes and values are required. They provide an instrument to enhance education and training programmes in mental health promotion contributing to a more skilled workforce and improved quality of practice as well.

Originality/value

A strong consensus was reached within the participating experts, them viewing all competencies as important. The identified competencies highlight the great variety of different competencies and competency areas that are needed for effective mental health promotion practice in the health sector.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 4 April 2019

Külliki Tafel-Viia

In times of converging and diversifying audiovisual (AV) industries, digitising health sector and the increasing phenomenon of cross-sectoral innovation, the question…

Abstract

In times of converging and diversifying audiovisual (AV) industries, digitising health sector and the increasing phenomenon of cross-sectoral innovation, the question arises about the state of affairs between the health and AV sectors. The chapter aims to explore what the main modes of cross-sectoral cooperation between the health and AV sectors are and what supports and hinders the emergence of a related cross-innovation system. The chapter introduces two case studies carried out in Estonia and the wider Aarhus region (Midtjylland) in Denmark. At each site representatives of the main stakeholders of both sectors were interviewed – policy makers, entrepreneurs, educators and professionals. The results demonstrate the crucial role of path-dependencies – in terms of both hindering and enabling cross-sectoral dialogues – and also the importance of effective coordination in supporting cross-innovation.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 20 May 2020

Aye Nyein Ei and Montakarn Chuemchit

Gender-based violence (GBV) has negative impact on the health and well-being of the survivors. The initial response can lessen the magnitude of the effect, and thus the…

1004

Abstract

Purpose

Gender-based violence (GBV) has negative impact on the health and well-being of the survivors. The initial response can lessen the magnitude of the effect, and thus the health care sector's readiness to respond to GBV cases is important. This study aimed to explore the knowledge, attitude and its association to practice regarding GBV response among health care personnel.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study was conducted in 48 public hospitals in Yangon, Myanmar, involving 398 participants including doctors and nurses, by a self-administered structured questionnaire.

Findings

Among 398 participants, most of the participants had moderate level of knowledge, attitude and supportive environmental factors. Only 12.8% had experienced GBV management. The respondents with a bachelor's degree were more likely to practice on health care management towards GBV cases than those who finished with a diploma degree. The medical officers and senior medical officers were more likely to practice than the junior nurses. The participants who had already attended the trainings had more practice than those who had not. Those who work in the regional hospitals were less likely to practice than those who work in the station-level hospital.

Originality/value

This paper explored the associated factors to health care personnel's practice of health care management towards GBV survivors in Myanmar which contains information about knowledge, attitude and supportive environmental factors. The study results can be used for a supportive data for health system strengthening the response of GBV cases in Myanmar.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Jim Connelly

To date the practice of health sector management has not been sufficiently theorised. An adequate theory should be able to answer the pre‐eminent critique of managerial…

1886

Abstract

To date the practice of health sector management has not been sufficiently theorised. An adequate theory should be able to answer the pre‐eminent critique of managerial rationality and ethics mounted by Alasdair MacIntyre in After Virtue and should also offer robust analytical and ethical resources to identify and engage with the social, political, economic and moral issues underlying health sector management. Critical realism with its ontology of generative mechanisms, agency‐structure relationships, valorisation of activity and ideology critique offers such resources in an empirically orientated but adequately theorised realist framework. Rather than negate MacIntyre, critical realism incorporates and transcends his key arguments regarding the rationality and ethics of management. This article introduces the main elements of critical realism and clears a conceptual space for the cumulation of critical realist case‐studies and managerial craft knowledge.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 14 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 January 2020

Nirmala Nath, Radiah Othman and Fawzi Laswad

This paper aims to provide insights into how the New Zealand Office of the Auditor-General (NZOAG) legitimised the selection of topics for performance audit in the New…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide insights into how the New Zealand Office of the Auditor-General (NZOAG) legitimised the selection of topics for performance audit in the New Zealand public health sector over a 10-year period, 2003-2013, by fulfilling the key actors’ “taken for granted beliefs” of the dual roles of the NZOAG: its independence and accountability.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses evidence gathered from interviews with representatives of the District Health Boards, the Ministry of Health (including Health Advisory Committee members) and NZOAG staff, along with publically available documentary evidence over a 10-year period. The authors draw on Suchman’s (1995) authority on institutional legitimacy to inform the research findings.

Findings

The New Zealand Auditors-General (NZAGs) get inputs from various sources such as their own audit teams, parliamentary deliberations, the Ministry of Health, the District Health Boards, media and public concerns and complaints. These sources initiate ideas for performance audits. Subsequently, the NZAGs use the recurring themes and risk assessment criteria while simultaneously consulting with the auditees (the MOH and the DHBs) and other actors, such as health advisory groups, to select topics for such audits. This signals to the key actors, such as the MOH and the DHBs, that the NZOAG is addressing the topics and concerns relevant to the former while discharging its public accountability role. Furthermore, the consultative approach acts as a catalyst, ensuring that the actors involved with public sector health service delivery, specifically the auditees, accept the selected topic. This leads to a lack of resistance to and criticism of the topic; the selection process, therefore, is legitimatised, and credibility is added to the audits. Because of the consultative approach taken by the NZAGs, the actors, including the performance auditors, continue to believe that the Office acts independently from third party influence in selecting their audit topics, elevating the NZAGs’ moral legitimacy with respect to their public accountability role.

Research limitations/implications

The study’s focus group does not include parliamentary representatives, only representatives from the DHBs, the MOH and the NZOAG; therefore, the conclusions on effective discharge of the NZOAG’s accountability role and Parliamentary acceptance is not conclusive – the NZOAG acts on behalf of the Parliament in discharging its accountability role and the latter is also the formal recipient of the reports.

Practical implications

The implications for practitioners and policymakers are that the use of a consultative approach to select topics for performance audit in the absence of performance auditing standards ensures auditee readiness and acceptance of such audits. This also promotes mutual benefits and “trust” between the AG and auditees. Such audits can be used to bring about efficacy in health service delivery.

Social implications

The selected topics for audits will have an impact on citizens’ lifestyles, with improved health services delivery.

Originality/value

There is a dearth of research on who initiates the ideas for performance auditing and how the Office of the Auditor-General selects topics for such audits. This study adds a new dimension to the existing performance auditing literature. The authors reveal how the NZOAG seeks to legitimise the selection of topics for such audits by consulting with the auditees and other actors associated with public sector health service delivery, while upholding its independent status and making transparent how it discharges its accountability role within the context of performance auditing.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 November 2020

Finbar Lillis and Darryll Bravenboer

This article draws on a study of best practices in work-integrated learning (WIL) identified in the Middlesex University Degree Apprenticeships Development Fund (DADF…

Abstract

Purpose

This article draws on a study of best practices in work-integrated learning (WIL) identified in the Middlesex University Degree Apprenticeships Development Fund (DADF) Project, which examined their application for four public sector degree apprenticeships (DAs). The authors suggest that WIL pedagogical practices deployed to deliver DAs can bridge traditional pedagogical and occupational divisions while building institutional resilience in a post-viral world. The paper is intended to contribute to both practitioner and policy-level discourse regarding the best practice in WIL for DAs.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review of key texts was used to identify “success characteristics” in WIL “signature” pedagogies, with potential applicability for DA design and delivery. These characteristics were used to frame interrogation of best pedagogical practices, using the best practice matrix developed. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with selected expert practitioners to examine their matrix responses and to discuss the researcher's initial “read-across” analysis of best practices and possible implications for pedagogical practice in WIL for DAs across other sectors. This paper also draws on feedback from employer groups who were consulted on the project report recommendations and further feedback from a national project dissemination conference in 2018. The findings from the research project have also been re-evaluated with reference to further literature in the context of the challenges presented by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

Findings

The findings from the study indicate that pedagogical best practices were to a significant degree transferable across professions and sectors; success characteristics in one pedagogical area (for example, mentoring/practice education) underpin success in another (recognition of prior learning [RPL] and practice-based assessment of achievement); success characteristics in WIL can also be applied and operated across professions and sectors to demonstrate how the best practice in WIL should be applied in the design of DAs more generally.

Research limitations/implications

The original project research study focussed on WIL pedagogical practices in four specified professions across four public sectors within one institution. This approach, though limited, enabled the research study to focus on in-depth qualitative interactions with practitioners from different sectors rather than institutional differences. As a consequence, the research study was able to focus on in-depth and dynamic interrelationships in pedagogical practice from the perspective of the professions, which facilitated productive examination of similarities and differences across these professions.

Originality/value

The research study provided evidence of the potential value of a more explicit recognition of WIL practice in the higher education sector and how consistent approaches to WIL should inform programme design. This has potential to improve the quality of curriculum design and pedagogy across DA programmes and provide a valuable reference point for quality assuring this provision.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Stephen Davies

To examine the importance of appropriate education for health services managers and to identify what might be included in the curriculum for health services management education.

1917

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the importance of appropriate education for health services managers and to identify what might be included in the curriculum for health services management education.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper approaches these two questions through an exploration of the distinctive characteristics of health services as a context for management, relating these to a less context‐specific literature on management education. The case for health services management and a description of the ideal curriculum are both developed from this analysis. The analysis is based on the UK but much of it will be applicable to other national settings.

Findings

Health services as a context for management practice are made distinctive by the circumstances of working in close proximity to clinical professionals and dominance of evidence‐based practice as a paradigm for the clinical professions. Professionalism is weak as a governing concept for managers and health is often a politicised context for management, especially in publicly owned systems like the UK National Health Service. Management education for health services managers is important for improving systems performance and should offer a broad curriculum that includes the context for practice; research awareness and skills of critical appraisal; a grounding in a range of disciplines and a reflective approach towards general management skills.

Practical implications

Greater value should be attached to health services management education and a systematic approach taken towards curriculum development.

Originality/value

The analysis presented leads to the conclusion that health services management requires a broad curriculum reflecting the rich experience that health services management can offer as an occupation. As the power and influence of managers and managerialism in health care continues to grow, so it becomes all the more important that what is required for their education is questioned and value attached to providing opportunities for that education.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 August 2020

Elirozz Carlie Labaria, Avegale Acosta and Charlotte Kendra Gotangco

Although the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030 explicitly recognizes the need for psychosocial support and mental health services, the focus of this…

Abstract

Although the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030 explicitly recognizes the need for psychosocial support and mental health services, the focus of this and many disaster risk reduction and management (DRRM) plans lies in the response, recovery, and rehabilitation phases. Less attention has been given to how mental health aspects affect the predisaster phase. This chapter explores the less understood concept of “resistance” in the perspectives model of disaster mental health, which is related to DRRM themes of “prevention and mitigation” and “preparedness” interventions. Four strategies are identified by which DRRM interventions can contribute to psychosocial support and mental health: increasing stress resistance, fostering cohesion and social support, fostering positive cognition, and building self-efficacy and hardiness. We review the cases of the Philippines, Indonesia, Myanmar, and Thailand and report existing socio-political DRRM initiatives for prevention, mitigation, and preparedness that can potentially enhance resistance as a predisaster intervention. Beyond medical services or clinical mental health interventions for select populations, DRRM interventions can benefit the general public. Despite natural intersections, there remains a need for deliberate and targeted initiatives that explore how vertical pyschosocial care programs can be created to straddle both DRRM and health sectors in practice.

Details

Resistance, Resilience, and Recovery from Disasters: Perspectives from Southeast Asia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-791-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 December 2021

Nagwan Abdulwahab AlQershi, Ramayah Thurasamy, Gamal Abdualmajed Ali, Hussein Abu Al-Rejal, Amr Al-Ganad and Ebrahim Frhan

This paper aims to examine the mediating role of human capital on the talent management in hospitals’ sustainable business performance in the health-care sector of Malaysia.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the mediating role of human capital on the talent management in hospitals’ sustainable business performance in the health-care sector of Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a quantitative approach, with an initial sample of 174 Malaysian hospitals. The theoretical framework was based on previous studies of talent management (TM), human capital (HC) and sustainable business performance (SBP). Partial least squares-structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) was used to test the study’s hypotheses.

Findings

Talent management mindset (TMM), but not talent management strategy (TMS), has a significant relationship with HC and SBP. HC has a significant direct relationship with SBP, and also mediates the relationship between TMM and SBP but not between TMS and SBP.

Research limitations/implications

This work is one of a limited number of studies to empirically address TM, HC and SBP in this context. The study is limited to Malaysian hospitals. It provides theoretical contributions by broadening the knowledge of HC, TM and the multifocal perspective of hospitals’ SBP, a relevant but underexplored issue, offering several avenues for future research.

Practical implications

The findings have beneficial practical implications for both policy makers and managers. First, focusing on talented people will directly improve sustainable performance in the Malaysian health sector. The findings also have important theoretical implications both for Malaysia and countries in similar situations. The study will serve as a reference point for such countries in trying to understand factors influencing SBP.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the mediating effect of HC on the relationship between talent management and hospitals’ sustainable business performance in Malaysia, or worldwide.

Details

International Journal of Ethics and Systems, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9369

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2009

Lloyd Ahamefule Amaghionyeodiwe

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether or not government health care spending reduces the poor‐rich differences in health status. Specifically, it aims to assess…

1747

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether or not government health care spending reduces the poor‐rich differences in health status. Specifically, it aims to assess the health status of the poor vis‐à‐vis government health spending in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

Regression analysis was carried out using the Ordinary Least Square method of estimation while secondary data was used.

Findings

It was found that despite the increase in most components of health care spending in Nigeria, the health status of the average Nigerian and the condition of health infrastructure has not improved appreciably. Also, the poor have significantly worse health status than the non‐poor and they (the poor) are more strongly affected by public spending on health care relative to the non‐poor. Thus, the difference in impact of spending between the poor and the non‐poor could be substantial.

Originality/value

This study provides information that will help reposition policies on government spending, especially on health care, so as to enhance and improve the heath status of the poor in Nigeria, thereby reducing the poor‐rich differences in health status.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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