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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Lester Sam A. Geroy and Arturo M. Pesigan

The purpose of this paper is to present a qualitative report on the implementation of activities aimed at reducing disaster risks through safer health facilities in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a qualitative report on the implementation of activities aimed at reducing disaster risks through safer health facilities in the Western Pacific region.

Design/methodology/approach

In response to the Global Campaign on Hospitals Safe from Disasters 2008‐2009, the World Health Organization, with support from the European Commission, provided tools that enabled government, communities and institutions to reduce the risks of their hospitals and health facilities from disasters due to natural hazards. Target countries included Cambodia, Lao PDR, the Philippines and Viet Nam. Different activities were implemented based on country needs, contexts and capacities.

Findings

Hospital assessments revealed gaps in infrastructure, essential emergency equipment and functional capacity. Enhancing preparedness and resilience of health facilities is a vital component to ensure risk mitigation and disaster response in communities.

Research limitations/implications

The report calls for further studies on specific gaps in health sector capacity, deficiencies in health infrastructure and economic analysis.

Practical implications

The health sector should implement disaster risk reduction and preparedness strategies through the support of local and national governments.

Originality/value

This is the first report on risk reduction initiatives in the health sector in developing countries in the region. Written at the regional perspective, it engages national and local governments, health policy makers and health facility administrators in the public and private sectors.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Donna Anderson, Ronald C. Plotnikoff, Kim Raine and Linda Barrett

This purpose of this research was to develop and establish psychometric properties of scales measuring individual leadership for health promotion.

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this research was to develop and establish psychometric properties of scales measuring individual leadership for health promotion.

Design/methodology/approach

Scales to measure leadership in health promotion were drafted based on capacity assessment instruments developed by other provinces involved in the Canadian Heart Health Initiative (CHHI), and on the literature. Content validity was established through a series of focus groups and expert opinion appraisals and pilot testing. Psychometric analyses provided empirical evidence of the construct validity and reliability of the leadership scales in the baseline survey (n=144) of the Alberta Heart Health Project.

Findings

Principal component analysis verified the construct of the leadership scales of personal work‐related practices and satisfaction with work‐related practices. Each of the theoretically a priori determined scales factored into two scales each for a total of four final scales. Scale alpha coefficients (Cronbach's alpha) ranged between 0.71 and 0.78, thus establishing good scale internal consistencies.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the relatively small sample size used in determining psychometric properties. In addition, further qualitative work would enhance understanding of the complexity of leadership in health organizations. These measures can be used by both researchers and practitioners for the assessment leadership for health promotion and to tailor interventions to increase leadership for health promotion in health organizations.

Originality/value

Establishing the psychometric properties and quality of leadership measures is an innovative step toward achieving capacity assessment instruments which facilitate evaluation of key relationships in developing health sector capacity for health promotion.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-0756

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Federica Pascale, Nabil Achour, Andrew D.F. Price and Francesco Polverino

This paper aims to evaluate emergency department (ED) design space planning approaches and draw lessons for developing more resilient and integrated ED guidelines. Two key…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate emergency department (ED) design space planning approaches and draw lessons for developing more resilient and integrated ED guidelines. Two key objectives have been set; these include: exploring potential factors affecting the ED performance, and investigate how ED space planning is addressed internationally through the evaluation of international case studies and design guidelines.

Design/methodology/approach

A robust research method has been adopted including comprehensive literature review in addition to 76 case studies from Italy and the USA.

Findings

Findings show that the important factors in defining ED space requirements are attendance variability, vulnerable groups and mass casualty events. The study concludes that current design guidelines and approaches need to be updated to meet with the current and future demand by taking into account design performance: effectiveness, efficiency and resilience, to avoid underestimating ED space; and that the US EDs are in a better position, than Italian EDs, to increase capacity when needed.

Originality/value

The contribution of this study is in providing a tangible “understanding” of factors influencing ED design and prepares a firm ground to develop more resilient and integrated design guidelines, able to meet current, exceptional and long-term needs of EDs. The study also shows that research can provide a valuable contribution to improve ED design which needs to feed more in practice to improve design process and guidelines.

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2019

Riza Yosia Sunindijo, Fatma Lestari and Oktomi Wijaya

This study aims to assess the hospital readiness and resiliency in a disaster-prone Indonesia.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the hospital readiness and resiliency in a disaster-prone Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

Hospital Safety Index (HSI), containing 151 items, was used to assess ten hospital in West Java and five hospitals in Yogyakarta.

Findings

The average level of HSI for the hospitals under investigation is B, indicating that their ability to function during and after emergencies and disasters are potentially at risk, thus, intervention measures are needed in the short term. Hospitals in Yogyakarta scored lowly in terms of their emergency and disaster management, even though they have previously experienced major disasters in 2006 and 2010.

Practical implications

The role of the government is crucial to improve hospital readiness and resiliency in Indonesia. It is recommended that they: identify disaster-prone areas so that their hospital readiness and resiliency can be assessed; assess the readiness and resiliency of hospitals the prioritized areas; implement intervention measures; re-assess the readiness and resiliency of hospitals in the prioritized areas after implementing intervention measures; and develop a framework to ensure that the hospitals can maintain their level of readiness and resiliency over time.

Originality/value

Research on hospital readiness and resiliency in Indonesia is still limited despite the size of the country and its proneness to disasters. This research has investigated the feasibility and value of using HSI to assess hospital readiness and resilience in Indonesia.

Details

Facilities , vol. 38 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2006

Angela Wasunna and Daniel W. Fitzgerald

No other region of the world has suffered from such devastating epidemics in the recent past than sub-Saharan Africa. HIV/AIDS poses the worst single health threat on the…

Abstract

No other region of the world has suffered from such devastating epidemics in the recent past than sub-Saharan Africa. HIV/AIDS poses the worst single health threat on the continent and approximately 28.5 million of people infected with HIV/AIDS are in sub-Saharan Africa, yet, less than 8% have access to treatment. As African countries start or continue to expand their HIV/AIDS treatment programs with the assistance of international donors, they are facing several ethical and health policy challenges, including difficult decisions on how to ration available treatment, the high cost of drugs, the complexity of treatment regimens, the inadequacy of health and delivery systems, the lack of knowledge about treatment, and the threat of drug resistance.

Details

Ethics and Epidemics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-412-6

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2020

Yngve Antonsen and Geir Bye

This study aims to analyse the line managers and employees’ use of lean task boards over time in Norwegian municipalities using action learning theory. The research…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyse the line managers and employees’ use of lean task boards over time in Norwegian municipalities using action learning theory. The research question was the following: what kind of action learning processes do the line managers and employees’ use of the lean task board promote in municipalities’ healthcare units?

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative case study data from a Norwegian municipality involved analyses of 750 internal self-recorded logs from task board sessions from 6 different units and 25 semi-structured interviews of managers and employees.

Findings

The task board works for line managers to make employees responsible for forwarding ideas, solutions and implementation of new actions. The use of the task boards contributes to systemising work through establishing new routines and improving orderliness at work. The line managers used the task boards as a project management system to track progress in the purchasing of diverse equipment and initiatives to improve professionalism and their units’ facilities. The study explains the learning challenges for managers using the lean task board, as the method promotes finding experience-based solutions that do not involve critical reflection and use of theory.

Practical implications

The lean task board is well-suited for managers to promote learning processes that counteract chaos in local healthcare organisations. However, the task board has limitations as a method for improving services amongst healthcare units and for solving difficult problems.

Originality/value

The study contributes to understanding how action learning theory can be applied to the analysis of the results of lean task board sessions

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Content available
Graphic analysis
Publication date: 6 May 2021

With Israel showing what life is like after widespread vaccination against COVID-19, the question is who will be next

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-GA261331

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Book part
Publication date: 13 March 2020

Julinda Hoxha

This chapter examines factors that maximize collaboration among various stakeholders with the purpose of health policy making in Turkey. The field research reveals that…

Abstract

This chapter examines factors that maximize collaboration among various stakeholders with the purpose of health policy making in Turkey. The field research reveals that policy networks have been formed in the sub-areas of public health, healthcare construction, and health tourism in the years between 2011 and 2015. Content analysis of 24 semi-structured interviews with policy and professional experts is conducted to assess Network Collaborative Capacity, built upon three dimensions, namely, structural, relational, and institutional. The findings reveal that networks differ in their capacity to collaborate as well as their impact on policy making resulting in three distinct models of network policy making. In the cases under investigation, network impact takes the form of (a) policy innovation through expertise sharing and evidence-based policy making associated with particularly high levels of relational capacity; (b) policy effectiveness through contract enforcement within a clear legal framework associated with particularly high levels of institutional capacity; and (c) policy coherence through organizational-knowledge-sharing and actor coordination. Findings also suggest that institutionalization in the form of network embeddedness in the surrounding political and economic environment is crucial for maintaining a collaborative momentum as well as achieving policy effectiveness at the stage of policy implementation. Based on these findings, further studies should focus on the institutionalization of policy networks, particularly in those middle-income countries such as Turkey that aim and often fail to address various policy challenges through short-lived practices of multi-stakeholder action. Finally, this study emphasizes the importance of incorporating neo-institutional approaches to network analysis.

Details

Network Policy Making within the Turkish Health Sector: Becoming Collaborative
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-095-5

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Abstract

Details

Government and Public Policy in the Pacific Islands
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-616-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

George A. Larbi

This article examines contracting‐out in practice in public health and water services in Ghana. Drawing on in‐depth interviews and discussions with knowledgeable…

Abstract

This article examines contracting‐out in practice in public health and water services in Ghana. Drawing on in‐depth interviews and discussions with knowledgeable officials, complemented by documentary analysis and secondary sources, the article provides insights into some of the institutional constraints and capacity issues that policy‐makers and implementers need to be aware of in seeking to introduce and implement contracting‐out policies in a developing country context. Though contracting‐out in Ghana’s health and water sectors has so far been used in the provision of support services, attempts to broaden its application to include the direct provision of core services raise a number of capacity questions related to regulatory frameworks, enforcement and monitoring mechanisms, development of management information systems and skills for contract management. The capacity and willingness of the private sector to take on direct provision of public services are also crucial.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 11 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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