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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Adrian Booth and Angela Burford

Mental health promotion is a relatively new, evolving and very exciting area of public health. The challenge for mental health promotion in Australia is ‘weaving its many…

Abstract

Mental health promotion is a relatively new, evolving and very exciting area of public health. The challenge for mental health promotion in Australia is ‘weaving its many threads’ through the various areas of mental health policy, programs and service delivery.

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Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Erica Wimbush

Training in research and evaluation skills is a frequently expressed need among health promotion practitioners. Research conducted in Scotland among health promotion

Abstract

Training in research and evaluation skills is a frequently expressed need among health promotion practitioners. Research conducted in Scotland among health promotion specialists and their managers showed that training in research on its own would be an insufficient response. In this paper, it is argued that there is a need to develop a broader strategy which seeks to strengthen research capacity within health promotion practice settings, rather than simply offering training to improve practitioners’ research skills. This will help to improve the quality of research conducted in practice settings and contribute to building an evidence base for health promotion. A broader professional development strategy for health promotion research in Scotland is proposed which utilizes a range of learning routes and delivery mechanisms. This will be backed up by the establishment of a broad strategic research partnership which brings together practitioners, researchers and policy‐makers so as to develop a better understanding of what evaluation evidence is needed and who is contributing what.

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Health Education, vol. 99 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Natasha Mauthner, Michael Killoran‐Ross and Jane Brown

This article reports on a literature review of interventions specifically identified as emanating from a mental health promotion (as opposed to prevention) paradigm. A…

Abstract

This article reports on a literature review of interventions specifically identified as emanating from a mental health promotion (as opposed to prevention) paradigm. A number of recurring debates in the field were identified, including language and terminology, defining ‘mental health’, models of mental health promotion, the use of overgeneralised concepts, values, beliefs and assumptions implicit in mental health promotion interventions, and diversity in what gets called mental health promotion and who does mental health promotion. The paper concludes by highlighting key issues critical to the future development of mental health promotion: the implications of mental health promotion being at an embryonic stage of development, the need for greater reflexivity, the need for integration, and issues concerning professional identity and practice in the mental health promotion field.

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Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2000

Andrew Tannahill

This paper identifies seven points in favour of integrating mental health promotion and general health promotion strategies: mental, physical and social aspects of health

Abstract

This paper identifies seven points in favour of integrating mental health promotion and general health promotion strategies: mental, physical and social aspects of health are inextricably inter‐linked; mental health is all too easily overlooked in thought and deed; life circumstances affect mental, social and physical health; mental, social and physical health have intertwined and shared roots; we need concerted action on these intertwined and shared roots; even topic‐specific action needs to be co‐ordinated and the promotion of mental health is a foundation for the promotion of general health. Attention is then focused on how such integration can be achieved, with reference to the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion and the ‘arenas’ approach to programmes. The paper concludes by widening out the notion of integration to that of health promotion as an integral part of our collective way of life, advocating the idea of ‘a healthy mind in a healthy body in a healthy society’.

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Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1997

Helen Grice and Noreen Kickham

Outlines the integration of “Health of the Nation” and quality assurance into a health promotion strategy and reports on its implementation in a UK Health Trust. Presents…

Abstract

Outlines the integration of “Health of the Nation” and quality assurance into a health promotion strategy and reports on its implementation in a UK Health Trust. Presents and discusses strengths and weaknesses of such a health promotion strategy.

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International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Gerjo Kok

Mental health promotion can learn from achievements in the field of health education and promotion. Health education and promotion has seen four major developments in the…

Abstract

Mental health promotion can learn from achievements in the field of health education and promotion. Health education and promotion has seen four major developments in the last decades: the need for planning, the need for evaluation, the behaviour‐environment issue, and the use of theory. A recently presented protocol for developing theory‐based and evidence‐based interventions, Intervention Mapping, is described here in more detail. Implementation is prominent in planning models and intervention protocols. The same expertise and professionalism that we put into the development of health promotion interventions for our target groups should be put into implementation interventions for programme users and decision‐makers.

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Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1995

Gerar McGhee

Explores the concept of profession in relation to the occupationalgroup known as health promotion officers and examines the question ofwhether it is appropriate or…

Abstract

Explores the concept of profession in relation to the occupational group known as health promotion officers and examines the question of whether it is appropriate or desirable for health promotion officers to seek to become professionals. Suggests that although the status of a profession initially appears to be desirable for the health promotion officer, such status can carry with it unwanted characteristics such as protectionism and élitism. Concludes that health promotion specialists need to strike a balance between those professional characteristics that are desirable and positive, while avoiding the negative attributes of professions which could seriously undermine the whole purpose and philosophy underpinning the health promotion officer′s role.

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Health Education, vol. 95 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

David Seedhouse

Mental health promotion is saturated with theoretical ambiguity and is ripe for sustained philosophical investigation. Unfortunately, most philosophical discussion in…

Abstract

Mental health promotion is saturated with theoretical ambiguity and is ripe for sustained philosophical investigation. Unfortunately, most philosophical discussion in health promotion is commonplace rather than academic, and many health promotion theorists are unaware that there is a difference. In order to illustrate this intransigent problem, I discuss Glenn MacDonald's recent contribution to this journal (Vol. 1, Issue 2). In so doing I demonstrate four philosophical errors frequently made in health promotion theory, research and practice.

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Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Jude Stansfield

This article suggests some dilemmas in producing local mental health promotion strategies, as experienced by a mental health promotion specialist in England. It argues…

Abstract

This article suggests some dilemmas in producing local mental health promotion strategies, as experienced by a mental health promotion specialist in England. It argues that, because of the misconceptions and misunderstandings associated with mental health and mental health promotion (MHP), some groundwork is needed to communicate a common and clear understanding. The author explains how she has communicated MHP among organisations in her locality. This includes exploring definitions of mental health and its relationship to mental illness, the rationale and effectiveness of promoting mental health and the use of a framework to plan or assess mental health promotion.

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Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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