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Book part
Publication date: 11 June 2009

Sachiko Ozawa and Damian G. Walker

Objective – To understand the role and influence of villagers’ trust for the health insurer on enrollment in a community-based health insurance (CBHI) scheme in Cambodia.…

Abstract

Objective – To understand the role and influence of villagers’ trust for the health insurer on enrollment in a community-based health insurance (CBHI) scheme in Cambodia.

Methodology/approach – This study was conducted in northwest Cambodia where a CBHI scheme operates with the highest enrollment rates in the country. A mixed method approach was employed to gauge how individuals in the community trust the health insurer, and whether this plays a role in their decisions to enroll in CBHI schemes. Focus groups and household surveys were carried out to identify and measure trust levels, and to explore the association between insurer trust and enrollment in CBHI schemes.

Findings – Although villagers generally trusted the health insurance organization, villagers with poor experiences with other organizations in the past were less willing to trust the insurer. Insurer trust represented a combination of interpersonal and impersonal trust. After controlling for demographic factors, health care utilization, and household socio-economic status, insurer trust levels for villagers who newly enrolled (RRR=1.07, p<0.001) and renewed insurance (RRR=1.15, p<0.001) were significantly higher than those who never enrolled in CBHI schemes.

Implications for policy – This study illustrates the relationship between CBHI enrollment and villagers’ trust for the health insurer in a low-income, post-conflict country. It highlights the need for staff of health insurance organizations to place greater emphasis on building trusting interpersonal relationships with villagers. Understanding the nature of trust for the health insurer is essential to improve health insurance enrollment and protect people in poor rural communities against the impact of health-related shocks.

Details

Innovations in Health System Finance in Developing and Transitional Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-664-5

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 10 May 2022

Simone Fanelli, Lorenzo Pratici, Fiorella Pia Salvatore, Chiara Carolina Donelli and Antonello Zangrandi

This study aims to provide a picture of the current state of art in the use of big data for decision-making processes for the management of health-care organizations.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide a picture of the current state of art in the use of big data for decision-making processes for the management of health-care organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review was carried out. The research uses two analyses: descriptive analysis, describing the evolution of citations; keywords; and the ten most influential papers, and bibliometric analysis, for content evaluation, for which a cluster analysis was performed.

Findings

A total of 48 articles were selected for bibliographic coupling out of an initial sample of more than 5,000 papers. Of the 48 articles, 29 are linked on the basis of their bibliography. Clustering the 29 articles on the basis of actual content, four research areas emerged: quality of care, quality of service, crisis management and data management.

Originality/value

Health-care organizations believe strongly that big data can become the most effective tool for correctly influencing the decision-making processes. Thus, more and more organizations continue to invest in big data analytics, and the literature on this topic has expanded rapidly. This study seeks to provide a comprehensive picture of the different streams of literature existing, together with gaps in research and future perspectives. The literature is mature enough for an analysis to be made and provide managers with useful insights on opportunities, criticisms and perspectives on the use of big data for health-care organizations. However, to date, there is no comprehensive literature review on the big data analysis in health care. Furthermore, as big data is a “sexy catchphrase,” more clarity on its usage may be needed. It represents an important tool to be investigated and its great potential is often yet to be discovered. This study thus sheds light on emerging issues and suggests further research that may be needed.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 December 2021

Anupama Singh and Sumi Jha

The purpose of this study is to understand the bi-directional causal relationship (regular and reverse causation) between employee well-being and organizational health

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to understand the bi-directional causal relationship (regular and reverse causation) between employee well-being and organizational health, which is grounded in the micro-foundations of institutional theory.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, employee well-being has two facets: work engagement and burnout. The positive aspect of employee well-being has been conceptualized by work engagement, whereas the negative aspect has been conceptualized with the help of burnout. As concurrent triangulation method was adopted, the qualitative data, as well as quantitative data, was collected from various laboratories of Council of Scientific and Industrial Research – an Indian research and development organization.

Findings

The findings did not show the existence of a symbiotic relationship between employee well-being and organizational health. The findings indicated the existence of a significant positive relationship between organizational health and employee well-being, but the reverse effect was found to be non-significant. This shows that when organizational health is good, employees’ health will also be good but not vice versa.

Originality/value

This study shows that health is not a static state, and so, at any given point in time, employee well-being cannot have a positive relationship with organizational health. Employee engagement helps enhance organizational health, whereas burnout can hinder organizational health if not properly mitigated.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 54 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 February 2022

Basel Hammoda and Susanne Durst

Knowledge is a critical factor for health-care organizations’ sustainability in today’s hyperconnected and technology reliant environment, which presents additional…

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge is a critical factor for health-care organizations’ sustainability in today’s hyperconnected and technology reliant environment, which presents additional challenges and responsibilities for managing knowledge and its risks in medical practices. This paper aims at developing a taxonomy of knowledge risks (KR) within a health-care context, with relevant descriptions and discussion of their possible impact on health-care organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

As KRs have not been discussed yet within a health-care context, the authors reviewed relevant literature on KRs and challenges to knowledge practices in general contexts and in other industries. In addition, the authors reviewed literature on knowledge management (KM) in health care. The authors synthesized their findings and combined it with authors’ insights based on their experience in the health-care and KM fields to develop the taxonomy of KR, with contextual explanations and expounded on their potential effects on health-care organizations.

Findings

The authors propose and explain 25 types of KRs in health-care organizations and organized them into three categories: human, operational and technology.

Practical implications

Proper identification of clinical and administrative KRs plays a critical role in their effective management and remediation, thus improving the quality of care, promoting efficiency savings and ensuring health-care organizations’ sustainability. This paper will raise the awareness of KR among health-care professionals and offer researchers solid ground for more rigorous research in the field of KR and their management, within the health-care context in specific.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this paper is the first to comprehensively discuss issues of KRs within a health-care context.

Article
Publication date: 21 July 2021

Mitchell Sarkies, Suzanne Robinson, Teralynn Ludwick, Jeffrey Braithwaite, Per Nilsen, Gregory Aarons, Bryan J. Weiner and Joanna Moullin

As a discipline, health organisation and management is focused on health-specific, collective behaviours and activities, whose empirical and theoretical scholarship…

Abstract

Purpose

As a discipline, health organisation and management is focused on health-specific, collective behaviours and activities, whose empirical and theoretical scholarship remains under-utilised in the field of implementation science. This under-engagement between fields potentially constrains the understanding of mechanisms influencing the implementation of evidence-based innovations in health care. The aim of this viewpoint article is to examine how a selection of theories, models and frameworks (theoretical approaches) have been applied to better understand phenomena at the micro, meso and macro systems levels for the implementation of health care innovations. The purpose of which is to illustrate the potential applicability and complementarity of embedding health organisation and management scholarship within the study of implementation science.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors begin by introducing the two fields, before exploring how exemplary theories, models and frameworks have been applied to study the implementation of innovations in the health organisation and management literature. In this viewpoint article, the authors briefly reviewed a targeted collection of articles published in the Journal of Health Organization and Management (as a proxy for the broader literature) and identified the theories, models and frameworks they applied in implementation studies. The authors then present a more detailed exploration of three interdisciplinary theories and how they were applied across three different levels of health systems: normalization process theory (NPT) at the micro individual and interpersonal level; institutional logics at the meso organisational level; and complexity theory at the macro policy level. These examples are used to illustrate practical considerations when implementing change in health care organisations that can and have been used across various levels of the health system beyond these presented examples.

Findings

Within the Journal of Health Organization and Management, the authors identified 31 implementation articles, utilising 34 theories, models or frameworks published in the last five years. As an example of how theories, models and frameworks can be applied at the micro individual and interpersonal levels, behavioural theories originating from psychology and sociology (e.g. NPT) were used to guide the selection of appropriate implementation strategies or explain implementation outcomes based on identified barriers and enablers to implementing innovations of interest. Projects aiming to implement change at the meso organisational level can learn from the application of theories such as institutional logics, which help elucidate how relationships at the macro and micro-level have a powerful influence on successful or unsuccessful organisational action. At the macro policy level, complexity theory represented a promising direction for implementation science by considering health care organisations as complex adaptive systems.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates the utility of a range of theories, models and frameworks for implementation science, from a health organisation and management standpoint. The authors’ viewpoint article suggests that increased crossovers could contribute to strengthening both disciplines and our understanding of how to support the implementation of evidence-based innovations in health care.

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Paul Lamarche and Lara Maillet

Improving the performance of health care organizations is now perceived as essential in order to better address the needs of the populations and respect their ability to…

Abstract

Purpose

Improving the performance of health care organizations is now perceived as essential in order to better address the needs of the populations and respect their ability to pay for the services. There is no consensus on what is performance. It is increasingly considered as the optimal execution of four functions that every organization must achieve in order to survive and develop: reach goals; adapt to its environment; produce goods or services and maintain values; and a satisfying organizational climate. There is also no consensus on strategies to improve this performance. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper intends to analyze the performance of primary health care organizations from the perspective of Kauffman’s model. It mainly aims to understand the often contradictory, paradoxical and unexpected results that emerge from studies on this topic.

Findings

To do so, the first section briefly presents Kauffman’s model and lays forward its principal components. The second section presents three studies on the performance of primary organizations and brings out the contradictory, paradoxical and unexpected results they obtained. The third section explains these results in the light of Kauffman’s model.

Originality/value

Kauffman’s model helps give meaning to the results of researches on performance of primary health care organizations that were qualified as paradoxical or unexpected. The performance of primary health care organizations then cannot be understood by only taking into account the characteristics of these organizations. The complexity of the environments in which they operate must simultaneously be taken into account. This paper brings original development of an integrated view of the performance of organizations, their own characteristics and those of the local environment in which they operated.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Dari Alhuwail

This paper aims to gain insights about information management practices in public health-care organizations in Kuwait and offer recommendations to improve these practices.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to gain insights about information management practices in public health-care organizations in Kuwait and offer recommendations to improve these practices.

Design/methodology/approach

This study involves secondary analysis of quantitative and qualitative accreditation-related data pertaining to the compliance with the Information Management standard at seven public tertiary health-care facilities over two accreditation cycles.

Findings

Overall, organizations improved their compliance with the Information Management standard. However, issues exist with effectively and efficiently transmitting data, aggregating clinical and administrative data and using the information for both strategic planning and quality improvement initiatives.

Research limitations/implications

The analysed data set does not provide information about the improvements done between the accreditation cycles. Caution should be applied before assuming generalizability of the results, considering the context and social constructs around the health-care system is essential.

Practical implications

Compliance with predetermined criteria through accreditation can improve information management practices. Without proper management of information at health-care facilities, achieving safe and effective patient care is futile. The role of health information technology (IT) should not be sidelined; robust health IT solutions can help support good information management practices thereby improving care quality and aiding health-care reform.

Originality/value

Concerning information management, health-care organizations providing focused services have clear advantages over organizations providing general care services. Considering the type of care organization (general vs specialized) can provide insights into how information management practices can affect the operations of the organization.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Martin Powell and Michele Castelli

The purpose of this paper is to critically explore hybrid organisations in health care. It examines the broad literature on hybrids focusing on issues of perspective…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically explore hybrid organisations in health care. It examines the broad literature on hybrids focusing on issues of perspective, definition, sub-type and level. It then presents the results of the literature review of hybrid health care organisations, exploring which organisations have been viewed as hybrids, and then examining studies in more detail with respect to the research questions.

Design/methodology/approach

It critically explores the literature on hybrid organisations in health care through a structured search.

Findings

It is found that a wide variety of hybrid forms exist, but not clear what they combine or how they combine it. However, the level of depth from some of these studies is rather limited, with little consensus on definition, and relatively few drawing on any explicit conceptual perspective. It seems that the wider hybridity literatures have limited influence of studies of hybrid health care organisations.

Originality/value

As far as the authors are aware, this paper is the first attempt to critically review the literature on hybrid organisations in health care. It is concluded that it is difficult to define and explain hybrid health care organisations. Health care hybrids appear to be chameleons as they appear to be able to change their form to different observers.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 31 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Michael A. West, Joanne Lyubovnikova, Regina Eckert and Jean-Louis Denis

The purpose of this paper is to examine the challenges that health care organizations face in nurturing and sustaining cultures that ensure the delivery of continually…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the challenges that health care organizations face in nurturing and sustaining cultures that ensure the delivery of continually improving, high quality and compassionate care for patients and other service users.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an extensive review of the literature, the authors examine the current and very challenging context of health care and highlight the core cultural elements needed to enable health care organizations to respond effectively to the challenges identified.

Findings

The role of leadership is found to be critical for nurturing high-quality care cultures. In particular, the authors focus on the construct of collective leadership and examine how this type of leadership style ensures that all staff take responsibility for ensuring high-quality care for patients.

Practical implications

Climates for quality and safety can be accomplished by the development of strategies that ensure leaders, leadership skills and leadership cultures are appropriate to meet the challenges health care organizations face in delivering continually improving, high quality, safe and compassionate patient care.

Originality/value

This paper provides a comprehensive integration of research findings on how to foster quality and safety climates in healthcare organizations, synthesizing insights from academic literature, practitioner reports and policy documents to propose clear, timely and much needed practical guidelines for healthcare organizations both nationally and internationally.

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2018

Anupama Singh and Sumi Jha

The purpose of this paper is to identify the dimensions of organizational health with the help of existing literature and focus group discussion on organizational health

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the dimensions of organizational health with the help of existing literature and focus group discussion on organizational health. The study also tries to categorize various antecedents and consequences of organizational health.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature review was conducted with limited search word on organizational health using databases like Emerald, Ebsco and Science direct. Focus group discussions were performed at Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute and National Metallurgical Laboratory – laboratories of Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, an Indian R&D organization. A total of 29 male and 6 female respondents participated in the focus group discussion.

Findings

The results showed that various dimensions of organizational health which were found using focus group discussions were in congruence with the literature reviewed on organizational health. The findings of focus group discussion also listed the antecedents and consequences of organizational health in an R&D organization.

Research limitations/implications

The literature presented conflicting views on organizational health construct. The focus group discussion provided clarity on the dimensions of organizational health. An empirical research can be done on organizational health considering dimensions identified during the focus group discussion.

Originality/value

It is an attempt to conceptualize the construct of organizational health in a research and development organization with the help of focus group discussion.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 50 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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