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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Pelagia Soultatou, Peter Duncan, Kyriacos Athanasiou and Irena Papadopoulos

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of health‐related needs on a policy design and curriculum enactment basis in terms of the national school health

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of health‐related needs on a policy design and curriculum enactment basis in terms of the national school health education curriculum in Greek secondary education.

Design/methodology/approach

A single case study, using an ethnographic approach, was conducted in Greece, seeking to understand the continuum from policy design to curriculum enactment in respect of health‐related needs. Three sources of data were used to meet this goal: policy texts, observation, and interviews. Multilevel sampling was employed to select one secondary school as a site for “good practice”. Grounded theory coding, thematic analysis and critical discourse analysis identified themes associated with the idea of health‐related through the corpus of data.

Findings

On a policy plan level the concept of health‐related needs was coupled with and reduced to a predetermined list of health‐related subjects; and the list of health‐related topics had not been updated for long and was characterised by a rather biomedical orientation. On a school practice level the stage of needs assessment was not applied, the list of health‐related subjects advocated in the policy plan was used on a proactive, normative and top down basis, and the students' felt needs tended to be disregarded.

Originality/value

This study followed up the continuum from policy design to school practice regarding the concept and practice of health needs, highlighting the possibilities and the problems from both perspectives.

Details

Health Education, vol. 111 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Book part
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Will R. McConnell and Brea L. Perry

While much research examines the consequences of deinstitutionalization for caregivers, few studies address support mobilization strategies used by patients themselves. We…

Abstract

Purpose

While much research examines the consequences of deinstitutionalization for caregivers, few studies address support mobilization strategies used by patients themselves. We examine the relationship between mental health patients’ needs, their activation of network ties for health discussion, and network dynamics during the course of treatment. We hypothesize that patients strategically activate their network ties for support that matches their needs. Linking activation to network dynamics, we also propose that patients with greater needs exhaust their supportive relationships and experience more network turnover.

Methodology/approach

We draw on a dataset of new mental health patients (N=173) and their associated network members (N=4,144) observed over three years. Random-intercept regression models test the relationship between patients’ needs and (1) network tie activation for health discussion and (2) network turnover.

Findings

Although the overall level of need does not predict network tie activation, mental health patients are more likely to activate network ties who provide support that matches their expressed needs for discussion, emotional, and financial support (although not instrumental or informational support). In addition, patients with elevated needs experience increased network turnover. Strategic activation and its unintended consequence together suggest a revolving door of support for patients in crisis.

Practical implications

In the post-deinstitutionalization era, patients’ informal social safety nets must compensate for needs that are left unmet by deficits in the formal treatment system. We find that patients seek out network members who are well-equipped to help them cope with the onset of illness. At the same time, network activation may lead to instability as high-need patients churn through supportive relationships. Future research should examine the consequences of tie activation and support needs for network dynamics in different treatment contexts.

Details

50 Years After Deinstitutionalization: Mental Illness in Contemporary Communities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-403-4

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Book part
Publication date: 13 October 2014

Jennifer S. Reinke and Catherine A. Solheim

Using Andersen’s (1968) behavioral model of health services use as a guiding conceptual framework, this study examined how receipt of family-centered care relates to the…

Abstract

Purpose

Using Andersen’s (1968) behavioral model of health services use as a guiding conceptual framework, this study examined how receipt of family-centered care relates to the perceived family challenges for families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Design

Data from the 2009–2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN) were analyzed for 812 parents of children with ASD.

Findings

Multiple regression analyses provided substantive statistical evidence that a child’s race, the adequacy of a family’s insurance, and the stability of child’s health care needs significantly contributed to predicting his or her receipt of family-centered care. Further results suggested a relationship between receipt of family-centered care and the perception of challenge for these families; families receiving family-centered care perceive fewer challenges and feel less unmet need for child health services.

Value

Family-centered professionals provide critical voices in the development of policies and programs geared toward improving the health outcomes of children with ASD and their families.

Details

Family Relationships and Familial Responses to Health Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-015-5

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2021

Qing Ke, Jia Tina Du and Lu Ji

The purpose of this paper is to understand how the contextual factors of health crisis information needs are different from a general health context and how these factors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how the contextual factors of health crisis information needs are different from a general health context and how these factors work together to shape human information needs.

Design/methodology/approach

This study collected the COVID-19-related questions posted on a Chinese social Q&A website for a period of 90 days since the pandemic outbreak in China. A qualitative thematic approach was applied to analyze the 1,681 valid questions using an open coding process.

Findings

A taxonomy of information need topics for a health crisis context that identifies 8 main categories and 33 subcategories was developed, from which four overarching themes were extracted. These include understanding, clarification and preparation; affection expression of worries and confidence; coping with a challenging situation and resuming normal life; and social roles in the pandemic. The authors discussed the differences between a health crisis and a normal health context shaping information needs. Finally, a conceptual framework was developed to illustrate the typology, nature and triggers of health crisis information needs.

Research limitations/implications

First, only the Baidu Zhidao platform was investigated, and caution is advised before assuming the generalizability of the results, as the questioners of Baidu Zhidao are not representative of the whole population. Furthermore, since at the time of writing the COVID-19 is still in an emerging and evolving situation (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2020), the collected data included only a relatively small sample size compared to the post-pandemic period, and this might have impact on the interpretation of the study’s findings.

Practical implications

The study’s taxonomy of information needs provides a reference for indexing and organizing related information during a disaster.

Social implications

The study helps authoritative organizations track and send information in social media and to inform about policies related to the pandemic (e.g., quarantine and traffic control policies in our study) to the right people in the right regions and settings when the next disaster emerges.

Originality/value

The taxonomy of information need topics for a health crisis context can be used to index and organize related information during a disaster and support many information agents to enhance their information service practices. It also deepens the understanding of the formation mechanism of information needs during a global health crisis.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 77 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Dan Wu, Hao Xu and Shu Fan

This paper aims to identify consumers' health information consultation patterns by analyzing information sources to better understand consumers' health information needs

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify consumers' health information consultation patterns by analyzing information sources to better understand consumers' health information needs and behavior in the context of multisource health information.

Design/methodology/approach

Haodaifu Online, an online health consultation (OHC) website in China, was used as a research data source, and 20,000 consultation cases were collected from the website with Python. After screening and cleaning, 1,601 consultation cases were included in this study. A content analysis-based mixed-methods research approach was applied to analyze these cases.

Findings

The results indicate that with the participation of OHC, there are 15 patterns of consumer health information consultation. Besides OHC, health information sources reported by consumers included medical institutions family/friends and the Internet. Consumers consult on a wide range of health issues including surgical conditions obstetrical and gynecological conditions and other 20 subjects. Consumers have multiple information needs when using OHC: getting prescriptions, diagnosing diseases, making appointments, understanding illnesses, confirming diagnoses and reviewing costs. Through further analysis it was found that consumers’ health information consultation patterns were also significantly different in health issues and health information needs.

Originality/value

This study broadens one’s understanding of consumer health information behavior, which contributes to the field of health information behavior, and also provides insight for OHC stakeholders to improve their services.

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Shaun Gravestock

This paper introduces service changes impacting on adults with learning disabilities, defines the concepts of learning disability, needs and need assessments, dual…

Abstract

This paper introduces service changes impacting on adults with learning disabilities, defines the concepts of learning disability, needs and need assessments, dual diagnosis and mental health needs and considers their service implications. Between 25% and 50% of adults with learning disabilities have mental health needs, and the main clinical types are outlined. The findings from a national multi‐professional survey of services for adults with learning disabilities and mental health needs are summarised and the difficulties of meeting the complex needs of these adults are demonstrated. Recent developments in clinical diagnostic assessment, needs assessment, care planning, outcome monitoring, staff training and service evaluation are discussed, including the possible advantages of the care programme approach (CPA). Recommendations are given for services for adults with learning disabilities and mental health needs and points for discussion with service users and carers are suggested.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2021

Yousef Moradi, Marzieh Mahboobi and Ghobad Moradi

Identifying the health-related needs in transgender (TG) people can help to formulate strategies for providing appropriate and accessible health services and promoting…

Abstract

Purpose

Identifying the health-related needs in transgender (TG) people can help to formulate strategies for providing appropriate and accessible health services and promoting health and social justice, as well as human rights in these populations. This systematic review aims to determine health-related needs, problems and barriers, as well as ways to solve them in TG people from the viewpoint of TG individuals and health policymakers.

Design/methodology/approach

All international electronic databases such as PubMed (Medline), Embase, CINAHL, Scopus, Web of Sciences, Cochrane, PsycInfo and Google Scholar (Gray Literature) were searched from December 1990 to December 2019. After the search, the articles were screened based on their title, abstract and full text. The quality of articles was assessed using the Strengthening the reporting of observational studies in epidemiology (STROBE), Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) and Standards for Reporting Qualitative Research (SRQR) checklists. The search strategy, data extraction and quality evaluation of articles were independently performed by two researchers.

Findings

The general health-related needs identified in TG individuals from the viewpoint of themselves included access to legal hormone therapy, psychological and psychiatric counseling, privacy, health and hygiene needs, equality and freedom of expression. General health-related needs in TG individuals from the viewpoint of health policymakers included screening tests to detect sexually transmitted diseases, especially HIV, cancers and other diseases, as well as training service providers (physicians, nurses, health workers, etc.).

Research limitations/implications

One of the limitations of this study was nonreporting of health-related needs in initial articles by different TG groups because these groups have had different needs and different barriers to accessing health-care services. In this study, health-related needs and barriers to satisfy them were categorized from the viewpoint of TG populations and health policymakers around the world, which may influence future decisions to provide services to TG populations. The results of this systematic review can help to develop different strategies by considering all TGs from individual, family and social aspects to better provide services for this group. However, given the dynamics and changes in the existing communities and the limited studies on gender minorities in developing countries, further research is required to comprehensively address the subject.

Originality/value

The findings can be used as an incentive to improve existing conditions and to address problems and shortcomings. The results of this systematic review formulate strategies for providing appropriate and accessible health services and better lives for TGs, planning for more effective participation of these individuals in local communities, improving their physical problems and mental health through counseling, as well as promoting health and social justice, and human rights for these populations.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2019

Denise Alexander, Uttara Kurup, Arjun Menon, Michael Mahgerefteh, Austin Warters, Michael Rigby and Mitch Blair

There is more to primary care than solely medical and nursing services. Models of Child Health Appraised (MOCHA) explored the role of the professions of pharmacy, dental…

Abstract

There is more to primary care than solely medical and nursing services. Models of Child Health Appraised (MOCHA) explored the role of the professions of pharmacy, dental health and social care as examples of affiliate contributors to primary care in providing health advice and treatment to children and young people. Pharmacies are much used, but their value as a resource for children seems to be insufficiently recognised in most European Union (EU) and European Economic Area (EEA) countries. Advice from a pharmacist is invaluable, particularly because many medicines for children are only available off-label, or not available in the correct dose, access to a pharmacist for simple queries around certain health issues is often easier and quicker than access to a primary care physician or nursing service. Preventive dentistry is available throughout the EU and EEA, but there are few targeted incentives to ensure all children receive the service, and accessibility to dental treatment is variable, particularly for disabled children or those with specific health needs. Social care services are an essential part of health care for many extremely vulnerable children, for example those with complex care needs. Mapping social care services and the interaction with health services is challenging due to their fragmented provision and the variability of access across the EU and EEA. A lack of coherent structure of the health and social care interface requires parents or other family members to navigate complex systems with little assistance. The needs of pharmacy, dentistry and social care are varied and interwoven with needs from each other and from the healthcare system. Yet, because this inter-connectivity is not sufficiently recognised in the EU and EEA countries, there is a need for improvement of coordination and with the need for these services to focus more fully on children and young people.

Details

Issues and Opportunities in Primary Health Care for Children in Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-354-9

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2009

Robin Johnson

Four routes or pathways have now been identified by which individuals may come within the scope of PSA 16 National Indicator 149, which is concerned with monitoring…

Abstract

Four routes or pathways have now been identified by which individuals may come within the scope of PSA 16 National Indicator 149, which is concerned with monitoring efforts to achieve settled accommodation for individuals with significant mental health problems. This article focuses on their needs and the identification of those with mental health needs as seen through these four principal routes. An understanding of these four possible pathways can help to identify areas for priority action, local delivery chains and partnerships, and also highlight some of the challenges and risks in and for delivery.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Maria Horne and John Costello

This paper reports on an action research study whose aim was to elicit the health needs of older people as part of a wider health needs assessment exercise. The sample…

Abstract

This paper reports on an action research study whose aim was to elicit the health needs of older people as part of a wider health needs assessment exercise. The sample consisted of twelve older people (n=12) who lived in East Lancashire. Focus groups were used to identify perceived health needs. The majority of older people in the sample expressed concern about access to primary care, lengthy out‐patient department appointments and poor transport facilities to access health resources. An indirect consequence of their perceived health needs was reduced socialisation due to fear of going out, particularly at night. The findings raise issues to do with developing a more considered view of methods for eliciting the views, beliefs and attitudes of older people about health needs. The study has implications for primary care trusts and statutory services regarding the provision of health care to older people.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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