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Book part
Publication date: 23 February 2015

Karin Schnarr, Anne Snowdon, Heidi Cramm, Jason Cohen and Charles Alessi

While there is established research that explores individual innovations across countries or developments in a specific health area, there is less work that attempts to…

Abstract

Purpose

While there is established research that explores individual innovations across countries or developments in a specific health area, there is less work that attempts to match national innovations to specific systems of health governance to uncover themes across nations.

Design/methodology/approach

We used a cross-comparison design that employed content analysis of health governance models and innovation patterns in eight OECD nations (Australia, Britain, Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and the United States).

Findings

Country-level model of health governance may impact the focus of health innovation within the eight jurisdictions studied. Innovation across all governance models has targeted consumer engagement in health systems, the integration of health services across the continuum of care, access to care in the community, and financial models that drive competition.

Originality/value

Improving our understanding of the linkage between health governance and innovation in health systems may heighten awareness of potential enablers and barriers to innovation success.

Details

International Best Practices in Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-278-4

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2020

Richa Chaudhary and Chandan Kumar

This paper aims to examine the effect of the characteristics of innovation and change adopters on the rate of adoption of environmental sustainability innovations in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effect of the characteristics of innovation and change adopters on the rate of adoption of environmental sustainability innovations in hospitals of Bihar state in India.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from hospital administration, managers, doctors, nurses and staff working at various levels in both public and private hospitals of Bihar. Research model was tested using regression analysis with the help of statistical package for social sciences 24.

Findings

Innovation characteristics of relative advantage, simplicity, trialability and compatibility were found to significantly predict the adoption of eco-innovations while innovativeness and environmental opinion leadership failed to demonstrate any significant impact on sustainability adoption in hospitals.

Originality/value

This study provides important information to the change agents on how to diffuse green innovations in the unsustainable and inefficient areas and make them more sustainable. With no systematic investigation of sustainability innovations being done in the health-care sector in India, this study on eco-innovations in a resource-constrained state of India provides a fresh perspective and practical insights on the state of sustainability innovations in health care.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Kathryn J Hayes, Kathy Eljiz, Ann Dadich, Janna-Anneke Fitzgerald and Terry Sloan

The purpose of this paper is to provide a retrospective analysis of computer simulation’s role in accelerating individual innovation adoption decisions. The process…

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1372

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a retrospective analysis of computer simulation’s role in accelerating individual innovation adoption decisions. The process innovation examined is Lean Systems Thinking, and the organizational context is the imaging department of an Australian public hospital.

Design/methodology/approach

Intrinsic case study methods including observation, interviews with radiology and emergency personnel about scheduling procedures, mapping patient appointment processes and document analysis were used over three years and then complemented with retrospective interviews with key hospital staff. The multiple data sources and methods were combined in a pragmatic and reflexive manner to explore an extreme case that provides potential to act as an instructive template for effective change.

Findings

Computer simulation of process change ideas offered by staff to improve patient-flow accelerated the adoption of the process changes, largely because animated computer simulation permitted experimentation (trialability), provided observable predictions of change results (observability) and minimized perceived risk.

Research limitations/implications

The difficulty of making accurate comparisons between time periods in a health care setting is acknowledged.

Practical implications

This work has implications for policy, practice and theory, particularly for inducing the rapid diffusion of process innovations to address challenges facing health service organizations and national health systems.

Originality/value

The research demonstrates the value of animated computer simulation in presenting the need for change, identifying options, and predicting change outcomes and is the first work to indicate the importance of trialability, observability and risk reduction in individual adoption decisions in health services.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Clive Savory and Joyce Fortune

The purpose of this paper is to question whether the emphasis placed within translational research on a linear model of innovation provides the most effective model for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to question whether the emphasis placed within translational research on a linear model of innovation provides the most effective model for managing health technology innovation. Several alternative perspectives are presented that have potential to enhance the existing model of translational research. A case study is presented of innovation of a clinical decision support system. The paper concludes from the case study that an extending the triple helix model of technology transfer, to one based on a quadruple helix, present a basis for improving the performance translational research.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach is used to help understand development of an innovative technology within a teaching hospital. The case is then used to develop and refine a model of the health technology innovation system.

Findings

The paper concludes from the case study that existing models of translational research could be refined further through the development of a quadruple helix model of heath technology innovation that encompasses greater emphasis on user-led and open innovation perspectives.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents several implications for future research based on the need to enhance the model of health technology innovation used to guide policy and practice.

Practical implications

The quadruple helix model of innovation that is proposed can potentially guide alterations to the existing model of translational research in the healthcare sector. Several suggestions are made for how innovation activity can be better supported at both a policy and operational level.

Originality/value

This paper presents a synthesis of the innovation literature applied to a theoretically important case of open innovation in the UK National Health Service. It draws in perspectives from other industrial sectors and applies them specifically to the management and organisation of innovation activities around health technology and the services in which they are embedded.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

H. Harrington and Frank Voehl

At the center of its core, Health Care is the application of a general body of knowledge to the needs of a specific patient. For centuries, this knowledge was generally…

Abstract

At the center of its core, Health Care is the application of a general body of knowledge to the needs of a specific patient. For centuries, this knowledge was generally regarded as the property of the healing professions and the individual clinician, not necessarily of the health care delivery organization. Managerial practice also had a tendency to treat this knowledge as an attribute of the provider, thus focusing on the resources clinicians used as they provided care and on the hotel-type functions associated with inpatient institutions. That is, there was a deliberate differentiation between management practice, focused on business processes, and clinical practice, focused on the activities and decisions of diagnosis and treatment. Though often described as bureaucratic and incrementally changing, health care is also a very dynamic and innovative field. Around the globe, research scientists, private industries, academics, and governmental and nongovernmental agencies continue to work in innovating new ways to provide better care, find cures, and improve health. At the same time, health care delivery has been undergoing a gradual but important change. Patient care, once the domain of the individual practitioner, is becoming the domain of the care delivery organization. Additionally, the mission of these organizations is shifting. As science, technology, care processes, and care teams have become more complex and diverse, the way in which the activities of care are organized and the institutional context in which they occur have become an increasingly important determinant of the effectiveness and efficiency of that care. As a result, the object of management has changed. In response to these changes, health care managers have started focusing on the management of the care as well as the management of the institutions in which the care takes place, thereby creating a set of ‘Best Practices’ which are briefly described in this paper along with how the process of innovation is developing in the health care system.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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Article
Publication date: 16 December 2019

Tiziana Russo Spena and Mele Cristina

Over recent years, few industries have seen such dramatic changes as the healthcare industry. The potential connectivity of digital technologies is completely transforming…

Abstract

Purpose

Over recent years, few industries have seen such dramatic changes as the healthcare industry. The potential connectivity of digital technologies is completely transforming the healthcare ecosystem. This has resulted in companies increasingly investing in digital transformations to exploit data across channels, operations and patient outreach, by building on a practice approach and actor-network theory and being informed by service-dominant logic, this study aims to contribute by advancing the agential role of third-party actors to prompt innovation and shape service ecosystems.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is grounded in an epistemological contextualism. To gain situated knowledge and address the role of context in knowledge, understanding and meaning the authors adopted a qualitative methodology to study actors in their different contexts. The empirical research was based on case theory. The authors also took guidance from practice scholars about how to investigate actors’ practices. The unit of analysis moves from dyadic relationships to focus on practices across different networks of actors.

Findings

This study expands on the conceptualization of triad as proposed by Siltaloppi and Vargo (2017) by moving from the form of triadic relationships – brokerage, mediation and coalition – to the agency of e-health third-parties; and their practices to innovate in the healthcare ecosystem. This study focuses on the actors and the performativity of actions and grounding the conceptual view on an empirical base.

Practical implications

Third-party actors bring about innovative ways of doing business in the healthcare ecosystem. Their actions challenge the status quo and run counter to long-time practices. Third-parties support the complex set of interconnections between different healthcare actors for the provision of new service co-creation opportunities. Considering how these e-health third-parties performs has implications for health managers, patients and other actors.

Originality/value

This study focuses on the actors and the performativity of actions and grounding the conceptual view on an empirical base. The agency of third-party actors is their ability to act among others and to connect multiple social and material structures to boost innovation. They prompt innovation and shape service ecosystems by brokering, mediating and coalescing among a great variety of resources, practices and institutions.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Nirmala Nath, YuanYuan Hu and Chris Budge

The purpose of this paper is to identify the influential agents that led to the successful acceptance and diffusion of the Concerto clinical workstation at the Northern…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the influential agents that led to the successful acceptance and diffusion of the Concerto clinical workstation at the Northern District Health Board.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on Rogers’ diffusion of innovation theory to interpret and analyse the factors that enabled acceptance and successful implementation of the innovative Concerto clinical workstation.

Findings

The authors conclude that human factors (clinicians) and non-human factors (the software package) simultaneously influenced the ready acceptance of the innovation. The reason for the positive acceptance and full diffusion of Concerto as compared to iHealth is the increased functionality it offers and its ability to provide clinicians with comprehensive patient records over a period of time, which assists in making informed decisions regarding the treatment, discharge, hospitalisation and recommendations for the future well-being of patients.

Research limitations/implications

The study focused on only one district health board (DHB); therefore, the outcomes may not be representative of all DHBs.

Practical implications

The study has practical implications for clinicians, DHB members and public health regulators. The outcomes illuminate the “agents” that positively influenced the diffusion of Concerto. The regulators and the DHBs can use this as a benchmark to determine how to lead the successful diffusion of information technology (IT) innovation in the public health sector.

Social implications

The impact on society is evident in the paper, as the use of an innovation, such as Concerto, saves time taken by clinicians to make more informed decisions regarding their patient care.

Originality/value

This study contributes to new knowledge by investigating the diffusion process of IT innovation with an intention of establishing the factors that enabled this process.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Paul Windrum

The purpose of this paper is to examine the roles played by third sector organizations in forming and managing health innovation networks, and their contribution to the…

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2533

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the roles played by third sector organizations in forming and managing health innovation networks, and their contribution to the co-production of new health services.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data collected in four case studies, the findings highlight the central role of third sector organizations in forming and organizing public-private health networks.

Findings

They are trusted organizations, commonly patient advocates, with perceived neutrality. Members of these organizations take leading roles in innovations networks, using their excellent network connections and their prominent positions within their organizations to leverage competences and funding. A key asset of key third sector individuals is their prior experience of public and private sector organizations and, hence, the ability to move across public-private boundaries.

Practical implications

The research findings have important implications for practitioners. The author identifies a set of key drivers and barriers for the successful organization of innovation networks and the innovative services they develop. Prior knowledge and experience of partners, often linked to personal ties, in initial partner selection but are also important for trust and the effective organization of complementary competences during innovation projects. The absence of direct competitors – whether public, private or third sector organizations – is also highlighted. Non-rivalry and different partners’ interests in the outcomes of the innovation reduces moral hazard and the associated costs of setting up and monitoring formal contracts. Heterogeneity requires flexibility by actors; to understand partners’ different values, cultures, and organizational drivers. Finally, the research findings identify policy and practitioner enrolment as critical for the successful roll out and diffusion of service innovations.

Originality/value

The paper examines an important, but under researched issue – the role of third-sector organizations in collaborative innovation projects.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 52 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 4 October 2019

Karl-Emanuel Dionne and Paul Carlile

Innovation challenges are increasingly complex, cutting across distributed actors from different disciplines, organizations, and fields. Solving such challenges requires…

Abstract

Innovation challenges are increasingly complex, cutting across distributed actors from different disciplines, organizations, and fields. Solving such challenges requires creating the capacities of opening up for innovation to access and develop a greater amount and variety of knowledge and resources. Perspectives on open source, open innovation, and interorganizational collaboration have explored such capacities, but from different origins and scopes of analysis. Our practice-based integrative framework of “opening innovation” helps highlight these differences and connect their relative strengths. Through a critical literature review paired with an analysis of different empirical cases from Hacking Health, a non-profit organization helping drive digital health innovation, the authors reveal the user-centric, firm-centric, and field-centric approaches to opening innovation that progressively connect a greater variety of actors and resources. The authors show how specific new relational practices they produce address the new relational dynamics these connections bring to accumulate more resources for innovation to keep progressing.

Details

Managing Inter-organizational Collaborations: Process Views
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-592-0

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Arto Juhani Wallin and Lars Fuglsang

Although the digital era has given rise to major transformations in many industries, health care has been remarkably resistant to radical innovations coming outside the…

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1530

Abstract

Purpose

Although the digital era has given rise to major transformations in many industries, health care has been remarkably resistant to radical innovations coming outside the field. The purpose of this paper is to explore and explain how new ventures aim to break institutional arrangements (i.e. regulations, normative rules, and cultural-cognitive beliefs) protecting the field by introducing digitally enabled service innovations into health care markets.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is qualitative and interpretative in nature and utilizes case study as a research strategy. The paper is based on data that were collected through narrative interviews and document analysis from seven new ventures participating in a start-up accelerator program.

Findings

Results indicate that service innovations that require a change in the institutional structures of the health care system are enacted through three highly iterative key processes: institutional sensemaking that creates an understanding of prevailing institutional arrangements and that constructs meaning for institutional change efforts, theorization of change through linguistic device, and modifications of institutions by building legitimacy and mobilizing external constituencies.

Practical implications

The findings provide practical insights into how new ventures struggle, navigate, and negotiate on specific alternatives related to institutional change while pursuing the introduction of innovations to market.

Originality/value

This research extends the institutional perspective on service innovation by zooming into micro-level processes of institutional change driven by new ventures. The study develops the theory of institutional entrepreneurship by highlighting cognitive processes of change, and suggests incorporating “institutional thinking” more tightly into the study and management of service innovation.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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