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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Abdullah Ibrahim Alkraiji, Thomas Jackson and Ian Murray

Recent studies indicated that the level of adoption of health data standards in healthcare organisations remains frustratingly low worldwide although health data standards

Abstract

Purpose

Recent studies indicated that the level of adoption of health data standards in healthcare organisations remains frustratingly low worldwide although health data standards have been perceived to be an essential tool for interoperability barriers within health information systems. The relevant literature still lacks significant studies concerning the issues of the adoption process of health data standards in healthcare organisations, and in particular those in developing nation. In addressing this gap in knowledge, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the adoption decision of health data standards in tertiary healthcare organisations in Saudi Arabia, and to develop a technology-organisation-environment list that contains the critical factors influencing their adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple-case study methodology was conducted in Saudi Arabia and different data collection methods were used included semi-structured interviews with different decision makers at various levels and departments of the subject organisations, and documents analysis to identify critical factors to the adoption decision of health data standards.

Findings

The findings demonstrated a list of key factors from different aspects impacting the adoption decision of health data standards in the subject organisations. The technological factors are complexity and compatibility of health data standards, IT infrastructure, switching costs, market uncertainties, systems integration and enhancing the use of advanced systems. The main organisational factors are the lack of adequate policies and procedures and information management plan, resistance to change, data analysis and accreditation. The core environmental factors are the lack of national regulator and data exchange plan, national healthcare system and the shortage of professionals.

Research limitations/implications

The results from the qualitative data were difficult to generalise to other populations. For example, the structure of the health sector varies from country to country as each health sector has its own characteristics that affect and are affected by national circumstances. In order to provide a more grounded theory resulting from a qualitative study, further examination by conducting quantitative studies is required. In addition, the TOE approach does not take into account the sociotechnical issues and further research is required in this area.

Practical implications

The investigation into the adoption decision of health data standards in tertiary healthcare organisations in Saudi Arabia has led to the development of a technology-organisation-environment list that contains the critical factors influencing their adoption. The research outcome has addressed the gap in knowledge of the adoption of health data standards in healthcare organisations. It also provides the decision maker, and in particular those in developing nations, with better understanding of the adoption process of those standards to better judge and to develop suitable strategy of adoption interventions.

Originality/value

Although recent studies indicated that the level of adoption of health data standards in healthcare organisations remains frustratingly low, the prior studies related to health data standards missed out on the exploration of the adoption decision of different types of health data standards in healthcare organisations and the critical factors influencing their adoption. Research on health data standards adoption based out of a developing country such as Saudi Arabia can also potentially provide several new insights on standards practices.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Abdullah Alkraiji, Thomas Jackson and Ian Murray

This paper seeks to carry out a critical study of health data standards and adoption process with a focus on Saudi Arabia.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to carry out a critical study of health data standards and adoption process with a focus on Saudi Arabia.

Design/methodology/approach

Many developed nations have initiated programs to develop, promote, adopt and customise international health data standards to the local needs. The current status of, and future plans for, health data and related standards in developing countries are still questionable due to the absence of government actions, plans and related studies. However, the development of interoperable standards not only technically defines a method of interoperation between the different systems in a network but most importantly represents a proposal for the future of complex socio‐technical systems that is the shape of a national health information network and therefore a complex balance between different types of requirements including organisational, social and managerial aspects must be managed. This reaffirms the need for a more in‐depth study to evaluate the adoption of health information technology‐related standards at the decision‐making stage in developing countries. Based on diffusion of innovation theory and the theories surrounding the economics of standards, a case study method was applied in Saudi Arabia to study the adoption process of health data standards.

Findings

The preliminary analysis findings revealed that there are 18 factors influencing the decision‐making adoption process of acquiring certain standards.

Research limitations/implications

Qualitative study methods have been employed in the present study that have shed light on the many issues that need to be addressed in this field. Studies involving other countries including advanced nations should be done for which the present results have economic, social and educational implications.

Practical implications

The present study and findings should help inform policy and decision makers in developing health systems with the potential creation of information and structure that can sustain future and improved systems.

Originality/value

This paper makes a novel contribution at both academic and practical levels since both the academics and practitioners, who are devoted to the ongoing use of health data standards, still lack a significant body of evidence with regard to the factors that influence their adoption.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Sreenivas R. Sukumar, Ramachandran Natarajan and Regina K. Ferrell

The current trend in Big Data analytics and in particular health information technology is toward building sophisticated models, methods and tools for business…

Abstract

Purpose

The current trend in Big Data analytics and in particular health information technology is toward building sophisticated models, methods and tools for business, operational and clinical intelligence. However, the critical issue of data quality required for these models is not getting the attention it deserves. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the issues of data quality in the context of Big Data health care analytics.

Design/methodology/approach

The insights presented in this paper are the results of analytics work that was done in different organizations on a variety of health data sets. The data sets include Medicare and Medicaid claims, provider enrollment data sets from both public and private sources, electronic health records from regional health centers accessed through partnerships with health care claims processing entities under health privacy protected guidelines.

Findings

Assessment of data quality in health care has to consider: first, the entire lifecycle of health data; second, problems arising from errors and inaccuracies in the data itself; third, the source(s) and the pedigree of the data; and fourth, how the underlying purpose of data collection impact the analytic processing and knowledge expected to be derived. Automation in the form of data handling, storage, entry and processing technologies is to be viewed as a double-edged sword. At one level, automation can be a good solution, while at another level it can create a different set of data quality issues. Implementation of health care analytics with Big Data is enabled by a road map that addresses the organizational and technological aspects of data quality assurance.

Practical implications

The value derived from the use of analytics should be the primary determinant of data quality. Based on this premise, health care enterprises embracing Big Data should have a road map for a systematic approach to data quality. Health care data quality problems can be so very specific that organizations might have to build their own custom software or data quality rule engines.

Originality/value

Today, data quality issues are diagnosed and addressed in a piece-meal fashion. The authors recommend a data lifecycle approach and provide a road map, that is more appropriate with the dimensions of Big Data and fits different stages in the analytical workflow.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Jawahitha Sarabdeen and Immanuel Azaad Moonesar

The move toward e-health care in various countries is envisaged to reduce the cost of provision of health care, improve the quality of care and reduce medical errors. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The move toward e-health care in various countries is envisaged to reduce the cost of provision of health care, improve the quality of care and reduce medical errors. The most significant problem is the protection of patients’ data privacy. If the patients are reluctant or refuse to participate in health care system due to lack of privacy laws and regulations, the benefit of the full-fledged e-health care system cannot be materialized. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the available e-health data privacy protection laws and the perception of the people using the e-health care facilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers used content analysis to analyze the availability and comprehensive nature of the laws and regulations. The researchers also used survey method. Participants in the study comprised of health care professionals (n=46) and health care users (n=187) who are based in the Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The researchers applied descriptive statistics mechanisms and correlational analysis to analyze the data in the survey.

Findings

The content analysis revealed that the available health data protection laws are limited in scope. The survey results, however, showed that the respondents felt that they could trust the e-health services systems offered in the UAE as the data collected is protected, the rights are not violated. The research also revealed that there was no significance difference between the nationality and the privacy data statements. All the nationality agreed that there is protection in place for the protection of e-health data. There was no significance difference between the demographic data sets and the many data protection principles.

Originality/value

The findings on the users’ perception could help to evaluate the success in realizing current strategies and an action plan of benchmarking could be introduced.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2019

Michael Rigby, Grit Kühne and Shalmali Deshpande

Information and communication technologies can transform how services can be and are delivered as has already happened in other arenas, such as civil aviation, financial…

Abstract

Information and communication technologies can transform how services can be and are delivered as has already happened in other arenas, such as civil aviation, financial services and retailing. Most modern health care is heavily dependent on e-health, including record keeping, targeted information sharing and digital diagnostic and imaging techniques. However, there remains little scientific knowledge base for optimal system content and function in primary health care, particularly for children. Models of Child Health Appraised (MOCHA) aimed to establish the current e-health situation in children’s primary care services. Electronic health records (EHRs) are in regular use in much of northern and western Europe and in some newer European Union Member States, but other countries lag behind. MOCHA investigated the use of unique identifiers, the use of case-based public health EHRs and the capability of record linkage, linkage of information with school health data and monitoring of social media influences, such as health websites and health apps. A widespread lack of standards underlined a lack of research enquiry into this issue in terms of children’s health data and health knowledge. Health websites and apps are a growing area of healthcare delivery, but there is a worrying lack of safeguards in place. The challenge for policy-makers and practitioners is to be aware and to lead on the innovative harnessing of new technologies, while protecting child users against new harms.

Details

Issues and Opportunities in Primary Health Care for Children in Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-354-9

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Book part
Publication date: 25 June 2012

Chunhuei Chi, Jwo-Leun Lee and Rebecca Schoon

Purpose – The purpose of this article is to investigate one core research question: How can health information technology (HIT) be assessed in a national health care…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this article is to investigate one core research question: How can health information technology (HIT) be assessed in a national health care system context?

Design/methodology – We examine this question by taking a systematic approach within a national care system, in which the purpose of HIT is to contribute to a common national health care system's goal: to promote population health in an efficient way. Based on this approach we first develop a framework and our criteria of assessment, and then using Taiwan as a case study, demonstrate how one can apply this framework to assess a national system's HIT. The five criteria we developed are how well does the HIT (1) provide accessible and accurate public health and health care information to the population; (2) collect and provide population health and health care data for government and researchers to analyze population health and processes and outcomes of health care services; (3) provide accessible and timely information that helps to improve provision of cost-effective health care at an institutional level and promotes system-wide efficiency; (4) minimize transaction and administrative costs of the health care system; and (5) establish channels for population participation in governance while also protecting individual privacy.

Findings – The results indicate that Taiwan has high levels of achievement in two criteria while falling short in the other three. Major lessons we learned from this study are that HIT exists to serve a health care system, and the national health care system context dictates how one assesses its HIT.

Originality/value – There is a large body of literature published on the implementation of HIT and its impact on the quality and cost of health care delivery. The vast majority of the literature, however, is focused on a micro institutional level such as a hospital or a bit higher up, on an HMO or health insurance firm. Few have gone further to evaluate the implementation of HIT and its impact on a national health care system. The lack of such research motivated this study. The major contributions of this study are (i) to develop a framework that follows systems thinking principles and (ii) propose a process through which a nation can identify its objectives for HIT and systematically assess its national HIT system. Using Taiwan's national health care system as a case study, this paper demonstrated how it can be done.

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2017

H. Frank Cervone

Informatics work introduces information professionals to taxonomies and other classification systems outside the boundaries of traditional bibliographic systems. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Informatics work introduces information professionals to taxonomies and other classification systems outside the boundaries of traditional bibliographic systems. This paper aims to provide an overview of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) for informaticians and information professionals who may not have worked with the system previously.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the author reviews the purpose, history, current use and future trends of the ICD classification system.

Findings

ICD is used globally as a standard vocabulary for medical diagnoses and, in the USA, for medical procedures in hospitals. Understanding the classification system is vital to working with clinical medical data.

Originality/value

The ICD classification system is not commonly used by information professionals. This paper provides a brief overview that will familiarize the information professional with the standard and its uses related to medical practice.

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2007

Ali Ahamd Awad Rawabdeh

The purpose of this research is to examine the potential of e‐health by focusing explicitly on the delivery of health care products and services. The examination of e…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine the potential of e‐health by focusing explicitly on the delivery of health care products and services. The examination of e‐health activity is guided by one broad research question, “What is the potential for constructing e‐health strategy as an innovative health technology?”. A great amount of attention has been given to e‐health activity in the present day. However important this form of e‐health is, this type of service simply does not face the same constraints that must be addressed by those actually delivering health care services.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers employed a qualitative data collection technique to formulate more examples and cases to derive lessons for Jordan. Phone interviews in a random sample were conducted with corporate officers in Jordan in order to reveal the internal organizational structure and business trends, interface issues, marketing strategies, as well as comparing and contrasting the online health world to the traditional health care realm.

Findings

Internet‐related projects is a top priority for health care information technology executives in the present day, with a cautious approach toward “e‐health”, as many products have yet to mature, and that the “click and mortar” model may perhaps be the optimal strategy for e‐health in Jordan.

Research limitations/implications

This paper reviews the e‐health trends to demonstrate the tremendous potential for health‐related commercial activity on the internet. However, the researcher examining the barriers facing e‐health to the Jordanian health system also pointed out almost insurmountable challenges.

Practical implications

Despite the apparent promise of e‐health, its instability is measured by its failure so far to systematically penetrate the organization of health care. Beyond the pragmatic negotiation of e‐health in the immediate context of clinical practice, there are wider issues about how the development/implementation of e‐health is funded, about its organization and management at the policy level; and about its potential medico‐legal risks.

Originality/value

It is hoped that the handful of ventures into cyber medicine appears to be coming from a few enterprising physicians who have set up medical practices on the Web.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2018

Alistair George Tough and Paul Lihoma

The purpose of this research is to identify ways in which medical record keeping systems and health information systems might be integrated effectively and sustainably…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to identify ways in which medical record keeping systems and health information systems might be integrated effectively and sustainably. The aims include minimising the workload of busy frontline health professionals and radically improving data quality.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a qualitative research project, grounded in the theoretical stance that information systems are sociotechnical systems. The primary focus of this research is on real-life custom and practice. The study population consisted of participants in information systems. As is common in qualitative research, sampling was purposive rather than statistically representative.

Findings

This research suggests one unconventional conclusion. New approaches that use intermediate and hybrid technologies may have a better prospect of delivering satisfactory, realistic and affordable medium- to long-term solutions than strategies predicated on the assumption that only systems that are wholly electronic are worth considering.

Originality/value

This research is original in the sense that it investigated records rather than information technology systems. The findings are likely to be of applicability in other developing countries, especially those that share legacy systems with Malawi, such as Botswana, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2008

Ebrahim Al Nawakda, Abdul Hameed Fathi, Vincent Ribière and Mirghani Mohammed

This case study aims to present the implementation of knowledge management (KM) in the Ministry of Health (MoH) of the Kingdom of Bahrain. The Ministry is a very complex

Abstract

Purpose

This case study aims to present the implementation of knowledge management (KM) in the Ministry of Health (MoH) of the Kingdom of Bahrain. The Ministry is a very complex environment and it is suffering from information overload. The health care industry is a very intensive knowledge field where experience and tacit knowledge play an important part in delivering efficient health care to the nation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a case study conducted by people involved in the implementation of the KM initiative at the MoH and by the observation and interviews conducted by external researchers.

Findings

The paper finds that the implementing of KM had many positive impacts on the MoH in terms of planning and decision making. Even though it is difficult to create a knowledge sharing culture in an environment under pressure involving medical and administrative staff, the initial KM initiatives implemented at the MoH of Bahrain are believed to be the start for a serious and comprehensive KM drive within the Ministry in the coming few years.

Originality/value

The lessons learned from this case can help other health organizations to better understand the barriers and enablers associated with implementing a KM initiative in a complex environment.

Details

VINE, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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