Search results

1 – 10 of over 41000
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2008

Janet Cobb, Alison Giraud‐Saunders and Mike Kerr

This article addresses the need for health checks for people with learning disabilities as a proven route to identifying and tackling health inequalities, what health

Downloads
343

Abstract

This article addresses the need for health checks for people with learning disabilities as a proven route to identifying and tackling health inequalities, what health checks should look like (covering physical and mental health) and how they should be followed up, and how practices and primary care trusts (PCTs) can implement health checks, involving people with learning disabilities and family carers and drawing on the expertise of community learning disability teams. Experience from Wales and England of offering health checks is described, and some key learning points are drawn out. In particular we recommend the appointment of a strategic health facilitator to lead the introduction of health checks and to ensure that the results are used to improve the health and health care of the population of people with learning disabilities.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Holly Blake, Eleanor Bennett and Mark E. Batt

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain which employees choose to access occupational health checks (OHCs), their perceptions of the usefulness of information received…

Downloads
3231

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain which employees choose to access occupational health checks (OHCs), their perceptions of the usefulness of information received and whether they choose to act on tailored advice provided.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 253 hospital employees attended workplace OHC then completed online questionnaire survey.

Findings

Participants included new cases (80 per cent) and those who had accessed the service previously (20 per cent), all age categories (23-69 years) and all occupational groups, although the vast majority were in office-based sedentary job roles, nursing or allied health professions (AHP) (78.3 per cent). Almost half were overweight or obese (46.7 per cent); many reported existing health problems or family history of chronic disease. Participants perceived OHC s to be convenient, informative and useful for raising their awareness of health issues, reassurance and monitoring, early identification of potential health problems and signposting to appropriate services. Participants reported post-check dietary changes (41 per cent) and increases in physical activity (30 per cent); smokers reported quitting or cutting down (44 per cent) and those exceeding alcohol limits reported cutting frequency or units of consumption (48 per cent). More than half those advised to visit their GP complied (53 per cent).

Research limitations/implications

Future studies should investigate the efficacy of OHCs and whether reported lifestyle changes are sustained in the long-term.

Originality/value

General health checks can be feasibly delivered in a multi-site hospital workplace setting with diverse appeal. Provision of tailored health information can help to raise health awareness and motivate health behaviour change or maintenance amongst hospital employees, including those reporting risk factors for chronic disease. Employees value the investment of healthcare organisations in the health and wellbeing of their workforce.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Holly Blake, Basharat Hussain, Jenny Hand, David Rowlands, Amdani Juma and Catrin Evans

There is a need to increase access to HIV testing in the UK in male migrant communities. The purpose of this paper is to assess the uptake and acceptability of a workplace…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a need to increase access to HIV testing in the UK in male migrant communities. The purpose of this paper is to assess the uptake and acceptability of a workplace HIV testing intervention aimed at increasing access to testing in non-clinical settings.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 20 health check events were delivered at 11 UK organisations employing male migrant workers. Intervention included HIV testing, cholesterol, BMI, blood glucose, blood pressure; tailored health advice; take-away resources; optional post-event text reminders about HIV and general health. Mixed-methods evaluation included exit questionnaires (n=771), follow-up text messages (n=465) and qualitative interviews (n=35) to assess event acceptability. Qualitative data were analysed thematically.

Findings

Attendees were 776 employees from 50 countries (51 per cent male; 30 per cent migrant workers). A total of 52 per cent of attendees undertook an HIV test (75 per cent were first-time testers). In total, 96 per cent considered HIV testing to be an acceptable element of workplace health checks; 79 per cent reported new health-related knowledge; 60 per cent of attendees opted for follow-up text messaging; 26 per cent of text respondents reported independently taking HIV test post-event. High acceptability and uptake of HIV testing was associated with convenience, opportunity taking (through removal of deliberation and intentional test-seeking), and normalisation of HIV testing within a general health check.

Originality/value

This study is the first to demonstrate that opt-in HIV testing can be successfully delivered in the workplace within a multi-component health check. The workplace is an effective means of increasing access to HIV testing in groups at risk for HIV, including male migrant workers.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 31 July 2020

Nicholas Leigh-Hunt, Ruth Fletcher-Brown and Lynsey Mould

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how loneliness and other mental health problems in older local authority housing tenants can be identified and addressed.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how loneliness and other mental health problems in older local authority housing tenants can be identified and addressed.

Design/methodology/approach

A tenancy health check form to identify health and well-being issues was developed by housing and public health for use in a rolling programme of housing officer visits to elderly tenants. This form facilitated enquiries on loneliness, social isolation and mental health as part of a supportive conversation. Individuals identified as being lonely were signposted to a range of community activities and social groups, and for some, ongoing support via telephone was provided by the housing officer.

Findings

The tenancy health check helped identify loneliness in this population group and enabled signposting to an increased number of local community activities. In addition to improved individual well-being, social capital has been strengthened through the creation of community networks.

Practical implications

Use of a health check form during housing officer visits provides a low-cost means of identifying health and well-being issues in vulnerable populations and facilitates adoption of making every contact count approaches by social housing providers.

Originality/value

This case study demonstrates the scope to provide holistic support for social housing tenants through better connections between public sector and community organisations.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2008

Andrew Nocon, Liz Sayce and Zenobia Nadirshaw

It is well documented that the health of people with learning disabilities is worse in many ways than that of the rest of the population, and their lives are shorter. The…

Abstract

It is well documented that the health of people with learning disabilities is worse in many ways than that of the rest of the population, and their lives are shorter. The article reports on the results of a wide and diverse research programme, including reviews of the relevant literature, consultation, area studies and an inquiry panel, designed to gather the most complete picture possible of these health inequalities and the aspects of health services that permit them. The areas covered are morbidity, access to services, diagnosis, health problems, health promotion, health checks and services for people from black and minority ethnic populations. Inequalities are found in all these areas, some arising from professional prejudice, some from inadequate responses to characteristics shown by learning‐disabled people and some from unidentified causes. The article concludes with a summary of the measures needed to rectify the situation.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Tobias Alpsten

Putting behavioural insights theory into practice a trial in Southwark using iPLATO Hub to communicate with over 13,000 patients concluded that the right combination of…

Abstract

Purpose

Putting behavioural insights theory into practice a trial in Southwark using iPLATO Hub to communicate with over 13,000 patients concluded that the right combination of text messaging and letter content increased uptake of NHS Health Checks by 65 per cent. This iPLATO case study, based on a randomised controlled trial with the Department of Health, Public Health England and Southwark Council, reported in July 2015. The purpose of this paper is to spread best practice and help other parts of the country transform uptake to NHS Health Checks.

Design/methodology/approach

This research – led by the Department of Health and Southwark Council – was designed to test the impact of certain forms of communication informed by insights from behavioural science. These insights involved small, pragmatic and very low cost or free changes to the invitation process, for example, how messages are framed and the language used. These changes are designed to fit within existing practice, which means they can easily be scaled up across all CCGs.

Findings

Results from the trial also indicate that a combination of the deadline commitment letter and just a reminder text message (no primer message) was nearly as effective as two texts, while the new letters on their own (without any text messages) increased uptake to 21 per cent. This suggests that clear and concise text messages from the iPLATO Hub delivered the major impact on uptake.

Originality/value

iPLATO is working with the research group to expand the research and improve on the reported findings while helping to spread best practice across the NHS.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 14 December 2015

Jill Manthorpe and Valerie Lipman

The purpose of this paper is to summarise the findings of a desk-based international review investigating the checking of staff and volunteers working with adults who are…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to summarise the findings of a desk-based international review investigating the checking of staff and volunteers working with adults who are vulnerable or at risk (or similarly defined) receiving social care in their own homes, or in day centres or residential care.

Design/methodology/approach

In England, as part of the government’s attempts to prevent harm to vulnerable people, employers must check if their staff or volunteers are barred from working with vulnerable adults in the health and care sectors or if they have a relevant criminal record. This review sought to explore practices elsewhere, with a view to informing policy and practice debates. The review was undertaken in winter 2014-2015. It mainly involved a search of internet-based material and databases. This was further informed by communications with experts and practitioners from different countries.

Findings

The review found a variety of practices, ranging from no checks to substantial checks involving fingerprinting. Reasons for checks identified in different national contexts extend from efforts to stop fraudulent use of government subsidies to minimising the risk of harm to vulnerable adults, and more positively to enhance user and public trust in care providers. A small number of countries place particular emphasis on the rights of individuals to privacy and rehabilitation and this moral imperative overrides other policy goals. This review highlighted a lack of clarity in publicly available documents about the potentially multiple policy goals of different schemes and suggests that there may be advantages to clarifying the options available from other countries.

Research limitations/implications

This review was confined to English language material and to material located through internet searching. Some material may not have been updated on internet sites.

Originality/value

The details of the processes have not previously been collated to the best of the authors’ knowledge.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Brenda Leese, Claire Storey, Jackie Ford and Francine Cheater

Research Governance has been introduced to regulate research involving National Health Service (NHS) patients and staff but the process is lengthy and bureaucratic and has…

Downloads
1434

Abstract

Purpose

Research Governance has been introduced to regulate research involving National Health Service (NHS) patients and staff but the process is lengthy and bureaucratic and has improved little since its introduction. The paper seeks to investigate changes over time.

Design/methodology/approach

A comparison between two studies, one in 2003‐2004 and the second in 2004‐2005, provided the opportunity of observing the process of Research Governance as it was developing. Both studies included postal questionnaire surveys and interviews with study participants.

Findings

In order to achieve Research Governance approval, application forms have to be completed, reviews undertaken, sponsors and indemnity information identified and honorary contracts from individual PCTs applied for. Honorary contracts can require references and health and Criminal Records Bureau checks. The process reduces the time available for research and employs large numbers of people, yet is still inefficient. Some of the requirements reduce the quality of the research and researchers' rights are marginalised.

Research limitations/implications

The studies took place in a rapidly changing research environment. Further studies should continue to assess the situation and report any progress in making Research Governance less onerous for researchers.

Practical implications

There is an urgent requirement to investigate how procedures can be simplified and made less bureaucratic and costly, and to protect the rights of researchers. Without this, primary care research will be seriously disadvantaged and may become impossible to pursue.

Originality/value

The study compares process over time and shows that achieving Research Governance approval is seriously limiting research in primary care.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 29 January 2020

Chao Fu, Qing Lv and Reza G. Badrnejad

Fog computing (FC) is a new field of research and has emerged as a complement to the cloud, which can mitigate the problems inherent to the cloud computing (CC) and…

Abstract

Purpose

Fog computing (FC) is a new field of research and has emerged as a complement to the cloud, which can mitigate the problems inherent to the cloud computing (CC) and internet of things (IoT) model such as unreliable latency, bandwidth constraints, security and mobility. Because there is no comprehensive study on the FC in health management processing systems techniques, this paper aims at surveying and analyzing the existing techniques systematically as well as offering some suggestions for upcoming works.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper complies with the methodological requirements of systematic literature reviews (SLR). The present paper investigates the newest systems and studies their practical techniques in detail. The applications of FC in health management systems have been categorized into three major groups, including review articles, data analysis, frameworks and models mechanisms.

Findings

The results have indicated that despite the popularity of FC as having real-time processing, low latency, dynamic configuration, scalability, low reaction time (less than a second), high bandwidth, battery life and network traffic, a few issues remain unanswered, such as security. The most recent research has focused on improvements in remote monitoring of the patients, such as less latency and rapid response. Also, the results have shown the application of qualitative methodology and case study in the use of FC in health management systems. While FC studies are growing in the clinical field, CC studies are decreasing.

Research limitations/implications

This study aims to be comprehensive, but there are some limitations. This research has only surveyed the articles that are mined, according to a keyword exploration of FC health, FC health care, FC health big data and FC health management system. Fog-based applications in the health management system may not be published with determined keywords. Moreover, the publications written in non-English languages have been ignored. Some important research studies may be printed in a language other than English.

Practical implications

The results of this survey will be valuable for academicians, and these can provide visions into future research areas in this domain. This survey helps the hospitals and related industries to identify FC needs. Moreover, the disadvantages and advantages of the above systems have been studied, and their key issues have been emphasized to develop a more effective FC in health management processing mechanisms over IoT in the future.

Originality/value

Previous literature review studies in the field of SLR have used a simple literature review to find the tasks and challenges in the field. In this study, for the first time, the FC in health management processing systems is applied in a systematic review focused on the mediating role of the IoT and thereby provides a novel contribution. An SLR is conducted to find more specific answers to the proposed research questions. SLR helps to reduce implicit researcher bias. Through the adoption of broad search strategies, predefined search strings and uniform inclusion and exclusion criteria, SLR effectively forces researchers to search for studies beyond their subject areas and networks.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 49 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 13 January 2012

Eric Emerson, Gyles Glover, Sue Turner, Rob Greig, Chris Hatton, Susannah Baines, Alison Copeland, Felicity Evison, Hazel Roberts, Janet Robertson and Victoria Welch

The purpose of this paper is to describe the first 15 months of operation of an innovative specialist national public health observatory for intellectual disability.

Downloads
1008

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the first 15 months of operation of an innovative specialist national public health observatory for intellectual disability.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a narrative account of aims and achievements of the service.

Findings

In the first 15 months of operation the observatory has: made available to those involved in commissioning health and social care services, a wealth of information on the health needs of people with intellectual disabilities; identified specific improvements that could viably be made to increase the quality of future information; and begun working with local agencies to support them in making the best use of the available information.

Originality/value

People with intellectual disabilities experience significant health inequalities. This paper describes an innovative approach to helping local agencies make the best use of available information in order to commission services that may reduce these inequalities.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 41000