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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2020

Neha Garg and Pankaj Singh

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of work engagement as a mediator in the relationship of subjective well-being with work performance, work withdrawal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of work engagement as a mediator in the relationship of subjective well-being with work performance, work withdrawal behavior, physical and mental health.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey design was used to collect the data from 369 Indian software developers. Latent variable structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

Subjective well-being was found to have a significant positive association with work engagement and this, in turn, had significantly enhanced employee’s work performance and reduced work withdrawal behavior, mental and physical ill-health. In addition, work engagement was found to fully mediate the association of subjective well-being with work performance and mental ill-health, while it partially mediated the association of subjective well-being with work withdrawal behaviors and physical ill-health.

Practical implications

This paper contributes to the development of self-sustaining approach toward increasing work engagement and provides a way to deal with work-and-health outcomes.

Originality/value

This study is one of the early attempts to examine direct and indirect associations of subjective well-being with work-and-health outcomes in an Indian setting.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 9 June 2020

Inga Jona Jonsdottir, Gudbjorg Linda Rafnsdottir and Thorhildur Ólafsdóttir

The purpose of this paper is to further the understanding of public sector line managers' work-related well-being and health in relation to job strain, gender and

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to further the understanding of public sector line managers' work-related well-being and health in relation to job strain, gender and workplace social support.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was sent to all senior and middle line managers (N = 357) in three administrative departments of Iceland's largest municipality. The response rate was 64.7%. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyse the data.

Findings

A minority of respondents experience high job strain. However, for these managers, the risk of experiencing emotional exhaustion is about fivefold, compared to those not experiencing high job strain. Social support is an important buffering against job strain and enhances well-being. Female managers are more likely than their male counterparts to report myositis, back or shoulder pain and sleeping difficulty.

Practical implications

The study emphasises that workplace social support attenuates the negative impact of job strain on line managers' work-related well-being. Furthermore, it demonstrates that in a society at the forefront in gender equality, gender differences in health symptoms exist among line managers in the public sector – a finding that highlights the importance of studying all aspects of workplace well-being by gender. This calls for future research using a more comprehensive survey data and interviews to shed light on the pathways through which female line managers' health is negatively affected.

Originality/value

Knowledge relating to well-being and health of line managers in the public sector is scarce. This study contributes to filling that gap. As work-related well-being is often gender-blind, the value of the study is also the investigation of the gender patterns in the authors’ data.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

Caroline Alexis-Thomas

The purpose of this paper was to examine the issues related to the ability of the tourism sector in Tobago to contribute towards the health and well-being of the nation in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to examine the issues related to the ability of the tourism sector in Tobago to contribute towards the health and well-being of the nation in support of the sustainable development goal from the perspective of the tourism providers.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research methodology using semi-structured interviews was used to collect data from 29 tourism providers in Tobago. The sociological perspective of symbolic interactionism guided the study with a grounded theory approach for data analysis.

Findings

The results revealed that the dominant themes that came out of the study were issues related to the process of knowledge acquisition, social production of vulnerability, controversies and challenges and collective capacity action that articulated the connection between the tourism sector in Tobago and health and well-being as a sustainable development goal. The study recommended the creation of a formal platform for discussion and knowledge sharing, support for key tourism providers involved in health and wellness activities, infrastructure development and the creation of a reporting mechanism that would facilitate the framing of the sustainability strategy for the tourism sector in Tobago.

Practical implications

The paper contributed to the ongoing discourse on tourism and sustainable development with special emphasis on tourism contributing to realizing the health and well-being as a sustainable development goal for Tobago.

Originality/value

The findings provided the original views of tourism providers based on their experiences, feelings and opinions concerning the tourism sector in Tobago and its ability to contribute to health and well-being as a sustainable development goal by 2030.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Mark Dooris

The University of Central Lancashire's ‘Health Promoting University’ initiative has adopted a ‘settings‐based’ approach to health promotion, aimed at embedding within the…

Abstract

The University of Central Lancashire's ‘Health Promoting University’ initiative has adopted a ‘settings‐based’ approach to health promotion, aimed at embedding within the organisation an understanding of and commitment to holistic health and to development of its healthpromoting potential. Action to promote mental well‐being is one of the initiative's priority foci, overseen by a multidisciplinary inter‐agency working group. Experience to date suggests that the university is an important setting for the protection, promotion and maintenance of mental well‐being. It also suggests that the Health Promoting University offers a robust theoretical framework that can enable the practical development and implementation of a holistic, comprehensive and integrative approach to promoting mental well‐being. This paper provides an overview of the Health Promoting University initiative, describes work carried out on mental well‐being and explores the challenges and opportunities involved in seeking to use the Health Promoting University framework to promote mental well‐being.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Anthea Cooke and Tony Coggins

This paper describes the process of developing a mental health and well‐being impact assessment tool in Lewisham, as part of an attempt to increase understanding of mental…

Abstract

This paper describes the process of developing a mental health and well‐being impact assessment tool in Lewisham, as part of an attempt to increase understanding of mental health and well‐being in the context of regeneration programmes. It is presented as a work in progress and the authors would welcome feedback and debate on the complex issues raised when adapting health impact assessment methods to the assessment of mental well‐being.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2019

Esmée Sinéad Hanna and Steven Markham

The construction industry has high rates of work-related ill health. Whilst there have been more recent calls for a “health like safety” narrative within the industry…

Abstract

Purpose

The construction industry has high rates of work-related ill health. Whilst there have been more recent calls for a “health like safety” narrative within the industry, health has still predominantly been viewed via health risks rather than a more holistic conceptualisation of health and well-being. The workplace is viewed as a fruitful site for health promotion work, yet we know little about the possibilities and promise of health promotion within the construction industry. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores the views of stakeholders with health-related roles and responsibilities within the UK construction industry. From the 21 semi-structured qualitative interviews, thematic analysis was conducted and two key themes emerged: the construction industry as anti-health promoting and understanding industry-specific health issues.

Findings

The construction industry faces significant constraint in attempting to promote better health and well-being due to its makeup, yet the health and well-being issues of the industry notably stress, and early retirement are major issues for both the industry and individuals.

Practical implications

The authors argue that only through understanding the structural constraints of the industry in this way can the possibilities and potentials for undertaking health promotion work be fully embedded within the industry in order to help create meaningful change for both employees and the industry as a whole.

Originality/value

This paper offers insight into the challenges that exist within construction for promoting positive employee health and well-being and takes an in-depth approach to exploring why health promotion may not be occurring within the industry.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Carsten K.W. De Dreu, Dirk van Dierendonck and Maria T.M. Dijkstra

Conflict theory and research largely ignored the possible relationships between conflict at work, and individual health, well‐being, and job satisfaction. We present a…

Abstract

Conflict theory and research largely ignored the possible relationships between conflict at work, and individual health, well‐being, and job satisfaction. We present a model that argues that poor health and well‐being can trigger conflict in the workplace, and reduce the extent to which conflict is managed in a constructive, problem solving way. The model further proposes that conflict, especially when managed poorly, can have negative long‐term consequences for individual health and well‐being, producing psychosomatic complaints and feelings of burnout. We review research evidence and conclude, among other things, that the model is more likely to hold up when conflict involves relationships and socio‐emotional, rather than task‐related issues. Avenues for future research and implications for policy and organizational design are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Nadine Mellor and Jennifer Webster

The purpose of this paper is to identify key enablers and challenges in the implementation of a comprehensive approach to the management of employee well‐being.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify key enablers and challenges in the implementation of a comprehensive approach to the management of employee well‐being.

Design/methodology/approach

A large organization which had implemented such an approach was chosen as a case study. Company documents and data regarding the corporate well‐being strategy were analysed, informing the content of the approach. Interviews with implementers and managers were conducted to identify how it was done.

Findings

The focal organization had several health management systems capable of addressing the requirements for employee well‐being management. These included occupational safety and health, health promotion, management of ill‐health and human resource management. Key enablers identified were strong senior leadership support, dedicated resources, involvement of stakeholders and intensive communication. Challenges revolved around the integration of these systems into a coherent whole, striking a balance between a focus on occupational risks and lifestyle risks; readiness of managers to bring attention to the concept of employees’ well‐being and their ability to monitor employees’ health‐related needs. Together with a target‐driven work culture, these challenges worked against promoting well‐being.

Research limitations/implications

This case study is exploratory. Further research needs to gather direct views of both managers and employees on how the well‐being approach had been received. Explanatory research models that integrate health promotion and work management systems to better inform implementation strategy and the roles of managers are needed.

Originality/value

The paper shows that line managers need to make greater use of regular management processes such as work planning, formal and informal interactions, and resourcing, to monitor employees’ well‐being needs. They also need to continually self‐assess how their own leadership style may affect employee well‐being.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Marcello Bertotti, Ifeoma Elizabeth Dan-Ogosi and Mala Rao

Workplace well-being is key to improving health and therefore productivity. Although the Chinese population and their influence on business in the UK are growing rapidly…

Abstract

Purpose

Workplace well-being is key to improving health and therefore productivity. Although the Chinese population and their influence on business in the UK are growing rapidly, little is known about the attitudes of Chinese employers and employees towards workplace well-being. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a qualitative study to explore the views of Chinese employees and employers in London and interviewed occupational health and workplace well-being experts.

Findings

Employers’ understanding of workplace well-being was limited, their approach was reactive rather than proactive. Contextual factors hampered most efforts towards workplace well-being. Employees reported that working conditions were generally poor with likely implications for employees’ physical and mental health. Generational and migratory changes further complicate the scenario but potentially usher in positive change.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted in a London area with a high density of Chinese businesses. The study nevertheless covered only a limited selection of business sectors. Caution may therefore be necessary in assuming the transferability of these findings to other parts of the UK.

Practical implications

Chinese businesses are agreeable to being informed about and considering the business case for workplace well-being. Chinese workers need better working conditions, easier access to health services preferably delivered through Chinese-based networks of community and business associations which are trusted by both employers and employees.

Originality/value

This study offers novel evidence on the attitude of Chinese employers and employees towards workplace well-being by comparing views from both groups. Chinese people face considerable health and mental health problems through their work environment, in contrast with conclusions from the Health Survey for England and Labour Force Survey.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Meredith Amy Perry, Hilda Mulligan and Catherine Smith

The global ageing population places increased demands on the professional caregiver workforce. Literature reveals that although many in this workforce experience stress and

Abstract

Purpose

The global ageing population places increased demands on the professional caregiver workforce. Literature reveals that although many in this workforce experience stress and fatigue, they also experience high levels of work satisfaction. These findings seem contradictory and therefore warrant further qualitative exploration. The purpose of this paper is to explore how professional caregivers describe their health and well-being and to understand the interplay of work and life on health and well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via semi-structured individual or group interviews with 31 professional caregivers from in-home or residential care situations in three geographic locations across NZ and analysed for themes. The general inductive approach was used for data analysis.

Findings

The authors present two themes: “A holistic interpretation of health” discusses caregivers’ perceptions of the meaning of health and well-being. Three interrelated sub-themes (“Fulfilment of an inherent nature”, “Obligation to look after oneself”, and “Risk management”) reflect the interplay of factors which influence health and well-being as a caregiver and make up the second theme of “Being in tune”. If balance was not achieved, caregivers recognised this as a risk to their health and well-being, especially to their psychological health, and considered leaving the profession.

Originality/value

The authors identified that caregivers considered health and well-being from a holistic perspective. They had insight into factors influencing their health. Despite high levels of stress, there was an overall positive perception of health and well-being that appears due in part to participating in a profession that fulfils an inherent nature. Collaborative problem solving between management and workforce, alongside recognising and affirming the unique skills of this workforce may help to empower caregiver resilience.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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