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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2021

Numporn Insin, Chanuantong Tanasugarn and Sarunya Benjakul

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the Healthy Retirement Program's effectiveness toward skills improvement and evaluate changes in subjective health.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the Healthy Retirement Program's effectiveness toward skills improvement and evaluate changes in subjective health.

Design/methodology/approach

A quasi-experimental, pre and posttest of the comparison groups was conducted. Teachers who were going to retire within one year were recruited into the experimental (n = 47) and the comparison groups (n = 43). Questionnaires were administered at baseline, posttest and at the 6-months follow-up. An independent t-test and Mann–Whitney U test were applied to determine the differences in outcomes between groups.

Findings

The results revealed different effects regarding teachers' health status. In those who had no chronic disease, the experimental group had higher skills to understand health information at posttest and at follow-up (p = 0.036, 0.028). Skills to apply health information was also greater at follow-up (p = 0.042). Among those suffering from a chronic disease, skills to access and apply health information were significantly higher in the experimental group than that of the comparison at follow-up (p = 0.011, 0.046). Greater perceived health of the experimental group was also indicated (p = 0.032).

Originality/value

While the health conditions of teachers at the preretirement period are inconsistent, healthy lifestyle management after retirement is a crucial skill for retirement adjustment. Supporting teachers to be health literate should be included in the retirement planning program which emphasizes preretiree's ability to understand and take control of their health.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Alan L. Gustman and Thomas L. Steinmeier

A dynamic model of the evolution of health for those over the age of 50 is embedded in a structural, econometric model of retirement and saving. Effects of smoking…

Abstract

A dynamic model of the evolution of health for those over the age of 50 is embedded in a structural, econometric model of retirement and saving. Effects of smoking, obesity, alcohol consumption, depression, and other proclivities on medical conditions are analyzed, including hypertension, diabetes, cancer, lung disease, heart problems, stroke, psychiatric problems, and arthritis. Compared to a population in good health, the current health of the population reduces retirement age by about one year. Including detailed health dynamics in a retirement model does not influence estimates of the marginal effects of economic incentives on retirement.

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Yun Doo Lee, M. Kabir Hassan and Shari Lawrence

This study analyzes financial preparation for retirement of American men and women, using the 2013 Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF). The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study analyzes financial preparation for retirement of American men and women, using the 2013 Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF). The purpose of this paper is to research the adequacy of retirement preparation for men and women in their positive savings periods.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses probit analysis and multiple regression models to observe the statistical significance of several independent variables on retirement savings. The specific variables of analysis are socio-demographic, work related, financial assets, and attitudes about saving and investing for a sub-sample of individuals aged 35–45, 46–59, and 60–67.

Findings

For retirement preparation, income is a significant factor for both men and women aged 35–45. Excellent health is significant for both men and women aged 46–59, whereas the number of weeks worked per year was significant for men and women aged 60–67. In addition, health has significant positive effects on the amount of financial wealth invested in stocks while age has significant negative effects.

Research limitations/implications

This research uses data from the 2013 SCF to analyze factors affecting retirement preparation for men and women in their positive savings periods. The findings from this study can aid policy makers in designing retirement saving programs that can effectively incentivize individuals for adequately prepare for retirement.

Originality/value

Previous studies have focused on the effect of factors such as age, health, marital status, work history, education, income, family/household composition, and occupation on retirement savings over an individual’s lifetime. This study focuses specifically on retirement preparation or adequacy for men and women who are in their positive savings periods.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Mairéad Bracken-Scally and Sinéad McGilloway

Much has been written about the impact of emergency service work on personnel, but very little is known about the lives of personnel once they have retired. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Much has been written about the impact of emergency service work on personnel, but very little is known about the lives of personnel once they have retired. The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences and assess the quality of life (QoL) of emergency service retirees (ESRs) and to ascertain the possible longer term effects of emergency service work.

Design/methodology/approach

A series of one-to-one interviews was conducted with ESRs (n=10). These were then transcribed and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis.

Findings

A number of key emergent themes and associated sub-themes were identified from the analysis including: retirement as a major life change; potential impact of working role and unique aspects of emergency service work; trauma; and health and ageing more generally. Overall, the findings highlight the unique experiences of ESRs and the potential longer term impact of emergency service work on QoL in retirement.

Originality/value

In an under-researched area, the findings point towards a need to improve the transition to retirement for ESRs and, in particular, to enhance available supports, information and guidance for retirees, both prior to and following retirement.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Swarna Weerasinghe and Matthew Numer

This article presents a study of the social, emotional and physical health lifestyle behaviours of a socially marginalised segment of Canada's population: retired…

Abstract

This article presents a study of the social, emotional and physical health lifestyle behaviours of a socially marginalised segment of Canada's population: retired, widowed, immigrant mothers from a South Asian country. Using a narrative research process, we explore how present physical, emotional and social health leisure activities are influenced by behaviours from their childhood, with emphasis on migration to Canada, retirement and widowing as lifestyle behavioural change points. Our sample of immigrant women were living in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada during the time of the study. The study employed narrative inquiry, which is often used in migration studies. Our qualitative data analyses uncovered themes that linked present social health activities and early life behaviours and the influence on them of cultural constraints or stimulants. Three forms of sociocultural influences, gender segregation, patriarchal protection and early preparation for marriage, shaped adolescence and adult life as less physically active but more emotionally and socially healthy. Later life events, migration, retirement and widowing, enabled women to gain freedom to renegotiate and reconstruct late‐life styles to be more physically and socially active through ethno‐cultural social networks they had built after migration. The concluding discussion makes recommendations for health and social programme planning to draw attention to cultural realms that could help these women become physically active after migration without compromising traditional social behaviours.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

The Aging Workforce Handbook
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-448-8

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2010

Chanjira Pengcharoen and Kenneth S. Shultz

Population aging, and changes in labor force participation among older adults, will have tremendous impacts on the aging workforce. Thus it is imperative that the factors…

Abstract

Purpose

Population aging, and changes in labor force participation among older adults, will have tremendous impacts on the aging workforce. Thus it is imperative that the factors that influence whether older workers will continue in their career employment, engage in bridge employment, or fully retire, should be understood better. This paper aims to focus on these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In the present study longitudinal data for 2,869 older workers from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) data set in the USA were used to examine the influence of demographic (e.g. income), nonwork related factors (e.g. marital satisfaction), and work related factors (e.g. job involvement) on late‐life employment decisions over a ten year period from 1992 to 2002.

Findings

The results indicate a wide variety of factors impact employment decisions later in life. Specifically, it was found that work related factors of job involvement and schedule flexibility, as well as the nonwork related factors of certainty of retirement plans, attitudes toward retirement, and job seeking self‐efficacy all distinguished the various employment statuses (e.g. completely retired, partly retirement, and not retired at all) of older workers over a ten year period.

Originality/value

This study shows that both individuals and organizations need to examine a wide variety of factors when examining bridge employment decisions at the end of workers' careers. While most studies of bridge employment use cross‐sectional data, this paper uses longitudinal data to examine actual bridge employment decisions, rather that prospective desires or potentially faulty after‐the‐fact retrospective accounts.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 9 April 2008

Kristian Bolin, Matias Eklöf, Daniel Hallberg, Sören Höjgård and Björn Lindgren

In the 1990s, individuals aged 18–64 were eligible for disability insurance, if their work capacity was reduced by at least 25 percent (50 percent before 1993). In the…

Abstract

In the 1990s, individuals aged 18–64 were eligible for disability insurance, if their work capacity was reduced by at least 25 percent (50 percent before 1993). In the beginning of the period, before 1991, disability insurance could also be granted for labor market reasons (i.e., if unemployed had been compensated long enough to exhaust their benefits – obtained benefits for 300 days). This possibility was gradually phased out after 1991. In 1995, the enforcement of the rules was tightened. When evaluating applications for disability pensions, local insurance offices now had to request a medical certificate and a work-related test of the applicant's degree of work capacity. Local offices also had to consult the applicant's employer, physician, or other qualified personnel, and even pay personal visits to the applicant. The possibilities for rehabilitating the applicant should also be investigated. From 1997, work incapacity should be evaluated in relation to all possible employment opportunities. Potential income changes resulting from changes in employment should not affect the evaluation4 (National Social Insurance Board, 2005).

Details

Simulating an Ageing Population: A Microsimulation Approach Applied to Sweden
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-444-53253-4

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2012

Pierre‐Jean Messe

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether employers’ attitudes towards older workers, especially regarding promotions, really affect their retirement intentions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether employers’ attitudes towards older workers, especially regarding promotions, really affect their retirement intentions, distinguishing between men and women.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the author uses the 1992 wave of the Health and Retirement Study to estimate, through a Fields decomposition, the relative contribution of the feeling of an older worker to be discriminated against regarding promotions; and to explain the self‐reported probability to work full time after 62, decomposing by gender. Second, using the two first waves of HRS, the author removes any bias due to time‐constant unobserved heterogeneity, to test whether the individual feeling of being passed over for promotion may be misreported, owing to a strong preference for leisure. Finally, the author examines the effect of a change in this variable over time on the intentions to exit early.

Findings

The Fields decomposition shows that feeling passed over for promotion plays a non‐negligible role to predict retirement plans but only for women. In addition, using panel data allows a misreporting bias to be exhibited that may lead to underestimating of the negative effect of discriminatory practices towards older workers on their retirement plans. Lastly, an increase between 1992 and 1994 in the age‐discrimination towards older workers encouraged women to leave their job early, while it had no effect on retirement plans of men.

Practical implications

Empirical results put forward the idea that retirement intentions may differ across gender, owing to the different nature of the employer‐employee relation. While for men, this relation is characterized by delayed‐payment arrangements signed ex ante with the employer, as already shown by Adams, it is not true for women. Consequently, the age‐based preference of employers for promotion, leading to a lower probability of promotion for older workers, is treated by men as a consequence of ex ante arrangements and does not affect their retirement plans. However, women can attribute such attitudes of their employer to a kind of blatant discrimination, reducing therefore their attachment to their job.

Originality/value

The paper presents a longitudinal approach towards the determinants of retirement intentions that allows the unobserved heterogeneity constant over time to be removed and to estimate to what extent the feeling of being passed over for promotion may be attributed, for each gender, to some arrangements signed ex ante with the employer.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

Salvatore Zappalà, Marco Depolo, Franco Fraccaroli, Dina Guglielmi and Guido Sarchielli

The study seeks to investigate individual preference for early or late retirement. The aim is to determine the impact that variables at personal, work and organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

The study seeks to investigate individual preference for early or late retirement. The aim is to determine the impact that variables at personal, work and organizational, and retirement‐related levels exert on such preference.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was submitted to 275 Italian workers, aged from 45 to 63. The “preferred” and “expected” retirement ages were measured, and a preference for retiring before or after the expected age was computed. The questionnaire included personal (e.g. age, income), work and organizational (e.g. work importance, job demands and control), and retirement‐related variables (level of information on pensions and attitudes to retirement). Hierarchical multiple regressions analyses were conducted to test the impact of such variables on the preference for early or late retirement.

Findings

The results show a significant preference for retiring on average three years before the expected age. The preference for postponing retirement is related to chronological age and perception of income adequacy, but also to work variables (work importance, firm policies supporting aged employees) and attitudes to retirement.

Practical implications

Political and organizational strategies concerning old employees should take into account the widespread preference for early retirement. It is, however, possible to encourage late retirement by developing interventions aiming to meliorate working conditions, organizational perceptions and retirement attitudes.

Originality/value

The difference between preferred and expected retirement age may be useful to identify employees preferring late retirement. It is also suggested that certain psychosocial factors are related to such preference. This knowledge is relevant for European policies encouraging employees to stay longer in the workforce.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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