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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2006

David Marsden and Richard Belfield

The introduction of performance-related pay with performance management in the state school sector of England and Wales represents a considerable change in the school…

Abstract

The introduction of performance-related pay with performance management in the state school sector of England and Wales represents a considerable change in the school management system. After 2000, all teachers were subject to annual goal setting performance reviews. Experienced teachers were offered an extended pay scale based on performance instead of seniority, and to gain access to the new upper pay scale, teachers had to go through a ‘threshold assessment’ based on their professional skills and performance. This paper reports the results of a panel survey of classroom and head teachers which started in 2000 just before implementation of the new system, and then after one and after four years of operation. We find that both classroom and head teacher views have changed considerably over time, from initial general scepticism and opposition towards a more positive view, especially among head teachers by 2004. We argue that the adoption of an integrative bargaining approach to performance reviews explains why a growing minority of schools have achieved improved goal setting and improved pupil attainments as they have implemented performance management. Pay for performance has been one of the measures of organisational support that head teachers could bring to induce changes in teachers’ classroom priorities. We argue that the teachers’ case shows that a wider range of performance incentives than previously thought can be offered to employees in such occupations, provided that goal setting and performance measurement are approached as a form of negotiation instead of top-down.

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Advances in Industrial & Labor Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-470-6

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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

Don Adams and David T. Gamage

This paper aims to focus on a study of the effectiveness of head teacher leadership within TAFE NSW.

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2536

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on a study of the effectiveness of head teacher leadership within TAFE NSW.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative and qualitative methods were employed to identify and measure the effective leadership attributes of the head teachers. The research sample consisted of head teachers and teachers.

Findings

The results suggest that the effectiveness of head teachers' leadership needs to be improved substantially. More specifically, there was a significant difference between the self‐perceived leadership effectiveness of the head teachers and the leadership effectiveness perceived by the teachers. The study also showed that the effects of gender, length of service as a head teacher, length of service in the position and the educational discipline area did not have a substantial effect on head teacher leadership effectiveness. However, emergent issues such as workload, lack of support and training, and the gap between the head teacher and higher‐level management were significant factors affecting head teacher leadership.

Practical implications

The findings suggest leadership development programs should be initiated to assist in developing the leadership areas in need of improvement, and additionally the need for better succession planning of the organization.

Originality/value

A study of the nature and scale, focused on the head teacher leadership effectiveness has not been undertaken before, within the Australian context, and this paper presents some useful information for future workforce planning of VET institutions and significant addition to the existing stock of knowledge.

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Lillian Ocham and Ursulla Achieng Okoth

The purpose of this paper is to determine the effects of head teachers’ motivational practices on teacher performance in public secondary schools in Kenya. The objectives…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the effects of head teachers’ motivational practices on teacher performance in public secondary schools in Kenya. The objectives of the study: to determine the influence of staff recognition; shared leadership by teachers; participation in staff development programmes; and head teachers’ support for the teachers on performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study design was descriptive survey involving 186 teachers and 32 head teachers from Koibatek district. The instruments comprised of a questionnaire and an interview guide. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, and presented using tables and pie charts.

Findings

Recognition of teachers and good working conditions enhance teachers’ performance. Shared leadership between teachers and head teachers has a positive effect on teacher performance Teachers’ professional growth enhances performance. The teachers who receive head teachers’ support such as teaching materials are more motivated enhancing performance.

Research limitations/implications

Administrators of schools should often recognize teachers. The Board of Management, Teachers Service Commission, and head teachers should provide opportunities for shared leadership. The Quality Assurance and Standard (QAS) Directorate, need funds to engage teachers in in-service courses.

Practical implications

Teachers should be supported by providing teaching resources and ICT, and be given opportunities for advancement by government agencies.

Social implications

Teachers should be recognized through appreciation and other incentives during prize giving days and assemblies. Teachers be given responsibilities and freedom to act to develop abilities.

Originality/value

The research shows teacher motivation as a means of enhancing performance for quality management.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 18 August 2020

Nazir Ahmed Jogezai, Shaik Abdul Malik Mohamed Ismail and Fozia Ahmed Baloch

This study aimed at exploring the change facilitator styles (CFS) that secondary school head teachers in Pakistan possess.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed at exploring the change facilitator styles (CFS) that secondary school head teachers in Pakistan possess.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a quantitative study using Hall and George CFS questionnaire to collect data from 276 secondary school head teachers. The CFSQ used in this study consists of 30 Likert-type questions relating to six scales. The six scales, with five items each in aggregate, form three possible CFS, including initiator, manager and responder.

Findings

The results indicate that most secondary school head teachers (75.7%) in Pakistan used responder CFS to facilitate change in their schools. 16.7% of the head teachers used manger, while only 7.6% possessed initiator change facilitation styles.

Research limitations/implications

The study has implications for research, in particular in the developing countries where head teachers' leadership practices are rooted in the past with maintaining authority and status quo.

Practical implications

The study has implications for policymakers and schools in developing countries, like Pakistan, in terms of considering the vital role of head teachers in change implementation. In particular, in the prevailing cluster-based educational management, the study's findings remain valuable for schools in the Balochistan province of Pakistan.

Originality/value

The paper reports the results regarding secondary school head teachers' change facilitator styles in the context of power devolution in Pakistan. The authors believe that the manuscript is appropriate for publication by the international journal of educational management because it is in line with the aims and scope of the journal. The authors assure the originality of this work. It has not been published elsewhere, nor is it currently under consideration for publication in any other journal.

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

Martin Y. Zame, Warren C. Hope and Trinetia Respress

Leadership is a key commodity in twenty‐first century organizations. This is especially true for school organizations. This paper aims to respond to six questions about…

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4076

Abstract

Purpose

Leadership is a key commodity in twenty‐first century organizations. This is especially true for school organizations. This paper aims to respond to six questions about head teachers and leadership of basic schools.

Design/methodology/approach

Head teachers responded to survey items about proficiencies required for effective leadership and those demonstrated in practice. The Greater Accra region of Ghana was the setting and head teachers constituted the sample. A survey with a unique identifier was distributed to head teachers at their schools. Analysis was conducted using SPSS and output was translated into frequencies and percentages.

Findings

A premise of the research was that heads of basic schools lacked leadership proficiencies because of the absence of school leadership preparation programs. Heads of basic schools lack professional preparation in leadership, and practice management and administrative behaviors rather than leadership.

Practical implications

Ghana has implemented several reforms with the intent of developing a quality education system; however, there has not been a focus on leadership. The literature is clear about the vital role head teachers have in effective schools and student achievement. This research calls attention to the leadership needs of head teachers in the Ghana education system.

Originality/value

This research reveals that Ghana faces a leadership challenge related to head teachers' professional development. The results are an alert to policy makers to institute educational reform that addresses head teachers' leadership in basic schools.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2011

Naseer Ahmad Salfi

The main purpose of this study is to identify the successful leadership practices of head teachers for school improvement at secondary level in Pakistan.

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3269

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this study is to identify the successful leadership practices of head teachers for school improvement at secondary level in Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was descriptive (survey type) in nature. It was conducted on a sample of 351 secondary school head teachers, 702 elementary and secondary school teachers working in the government secondary schools of Punjab province. Data were collected using a mixed‐methods research design that included: review of related literature, documents indicating school achievements and student attainment, questionnaires and in‐depth semi‐structured interviews with different stakeholders including the head teachers, teachers, parents and students. The validity and reliability of the instruments was ensured through experts' opinions and pilot testing in mid‐2007; the overall reliability was established at 0.923 alpha level.

Findings

The findings of the study revealed that the majority of the head teachers of successful schools developed a common and shared school vision and promoted a culture of collaboration, support and trust. They empowered others to lead and distributed leadership responsibilities throughout the school; involved different stakeholders in the process of decision making; developed and maintained good relationships among different personnel of school community. They emphasised the professional development of teachers as well as themselves, and involved parents and community in the process of school improvement.

Practical implications

The findings of this article may be useful for other countries of almost similar socio‐economic status, to improve quality of teaching and learning at secondary level.

Originality/value

The paper shows that policy makers, administrators, managers and head teachers at secondary school level may improve school performance by adopting effective strategies for school improvement in Pakistan.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 49 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Jacki Gordon and Katrina M. Turner

Pupil autonomy, empowerment and clarity of school rules are factors underpied that the schools subscribed to different philosophies regarding pupil management. One school…

Abstract

Pupil autonomy, empowerment and clarity of school rules are factors underpied that the schools subscribed to different philosophies regarding pupil management. One school was largely authoritarian in its approach and the other was overly lenient. This paper emphasises the importance of furthering democratic principles of pupil participation within the context of clear rules and boundaries.

Details

Health Education, vol. 104 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2011

Hannah L. Brackenbury and Peter Willett

The purpose of this paper is to study the attitudes of UK head teachers and of librarians to the view that secondary school librarians should have the status of a head of…

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708

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the attitudes of UK head teachers and of librarians to the view that secondary school librarians should have the status of a head of department (HOD).

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires sent to 77 secondary schools in Cheshire, UK had response rates of 58 per cent from the librarians and of 49 per cent from the head teachers, with follow‐up interviews being conducted with 15 of the librarians.

Findings

Most librarians were employed as support staff, although many of them were doing a HOD's job; even when a librarian had this title, they did not often receive the recognition appropriate to such a role. Librarians were more likely to have HOD status in the independent schools sector than in the state‐maintained sector, and there was some evidence that head teachers and librarians have different views as to what a librarian's responsibilities should be.

Originality/value

There has been no previous study of this topic in the UK.

Details

Library Management, vol. 32 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Jim Grieves and Peter Hanafin

Aims to examine current debates about the recruitment and retention of teachers and explore the views of Local Education Authority Human Resource Advisors, governors and teachers.

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3308

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to examine current debates about the recruitment and retention of teachers and explore the views of Local Education Authority Human Resource Advisors, governors and teachers.

Design/methodology/approach

Addresses the issue of whether the Government is actually achieving its stated aims of best value in selecting, recruiting and retaining the most effective teachers in primary and secondary education.

Findings

The conclusion for the appointment of teachers in schools is that structured panel interviews, with trained panel members, and preferably including an HR professional, would represent best practice.

Originality/value

Raises serious concerns about the delegation of HR practice.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2020

Vasiliki Brinia, Georgia Papadopoulou and Paraskevi Psoni

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the way informal groups rise and operate in the Teacher Association in a Secondary Vocational School Unit in Greece. More…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the way informal groups rise and operate in the Teacher Association in a Secondary Vocational School Unit in Greece. More specifically, the way the role of the head teacher, the school culture and teachers’ emotional intelligence impacts these groups is investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research through in-depth interviews with teachers and the head teacher as well as the researchers’ participatory observation has been conducted, in order to support the selected method of the case-study.

Findings

The findings showed how both positive and negative informal groups rise and function in the Teacher Association. The role of the head teacher emerges as a very significant factor that influences the emergence and the preservation of such groups. The school culture has a bidirectional relation with the existence and quality of informal groups. Emotional intelligence also plays an important role in forming informal groups and in the quality of actions of these groups.

Originality/value

This study covers a significant gap in the international literature of group dynamics in a Teacher Association and provides practitioners with valuable insights regarding the underexamined factors that lead to the formation, operation and preservation of informal groups, the study of which can lead to the development of sophisticated scales of measurement of these dynamics by future researchers.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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