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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2019

Susana Fernández-Pérez de la Lastra, Fernando Martín-Alcázar and Gonzalo Sánchez-Gardey

This paper aims to conceptualize organizational ambidexterity and intellectual capital in the haute cuisine sector, describing their interrelation. Specifically, the study…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to conceptualize organizational ambidexterity and intellectual capital in the haute cuisine sector, describing their interrelation. Specifically, the study draws on the dimensions of intellectual capital as a lens to understand ambidextrous capabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

Three research questions were addressed using a qualitative methodology. The researchers conducted ten interviews with sector experts from haute cuisine restaurants.

Findings

The paper identifies the constituents of organizational ambidexterity and intellectual capital in the haute cuisine sector. It also frames how these elements interrelate each other to allow the generation of ambidextrous capabilities.

Research limitations/implications

The investigation was conducted in only one country and a single sector.

Practical implications

The study provides guidance for haute cuisine restaurant managers to simultaneously develop innovation and efficiency in everyday activities, without having to choose between these two strategic objectives. Results show they must focus on human capital, which is one of the most important strategic resources in haute cuisine restaurants. This paper can help managers to design the organizational structures, processes and routines that allow haute cuisine restaurants to be ambidextrous.

Originality/value

The understanding of organizational ambidexterity and intellectual capital, and their integration, is critical for successful hospitality operations; however, research in this area is still limited. This integration can help haute cuisine restaurants to develop ambidextrous capabilities through their intellectual capital, establishing mechanisms to integrate individuals and group capabilities within the organizations.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Bernard Surlemont and Colin Johnson

The hautecuisine industry must cope with two, apparently antagonist demands from customers: providing reliable advice about the choice of restaurant, while concurrently…

Abstract

Purpose

The hautecuisine industry must cope with two, apparently antagonist demands from customers: providing reliable advice about the choice of restaurant, while concurrently preserving the “magic of discovery” and creativity every hautecuisine restaurant should provide. This paper has the objective of analysing how the Michelin guide “star system” operates as a “signalling device” in the industry, and handles these two market requirements. The research also explores how secrecy contributes to preserve chefs' creativity for the benefit of customer satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is derived from 20 exploratory field interviews of chefs belonging to the “star system” in France, Switzerland and the UK.

Findings

Field research and analysis reveal the pressure to minimize type II errors, i.e. of selecting restaurants that do not merit inclusion and, consequently, increase type I errors. This behaviour explains the stability, reliability and consistency of the system.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is needed to analyse the extent to which the phenomenon observed in the hautecuisine industry is manifest in other artistic (i.e. fashion) or hospitality (i.e. hotels) related sectors.

Practical implications

There is no unique route to the star system. The best way for chefs to increase the odds to get promoted is to focus on quality, develop their own style and be patient. The policy of the Michelin guide opens the door for competing guides willing to take more risk of type I errors.

Originality/value

This exploratory research is the first attempt to analyse the role of gastronomic guides in the hautecuisine sector.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Marc B. Stierand and Viktor Dörfler

This paper aims to present and reflect on a phenomenological research process used to elucidate the nature of creativity and innovation in haute cuisine.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present and reflect on a phenomenological research process used to elucidate the nature of creativity and innovation in haute cuisine.

Design/methodology/approach

In‐depth unstructured interviews and field notes capturing subjective experiences were employed to elucidate the experiences of 18 top chefs from the UK, Spain, France, Austria and Germany with regards to creativity and innovation.

Findings

The findings are twofold: first, an empirical sample finding is presented in order to contextualize the type of findings obtained; second, key methodological findings are presented explaining the process of elucidating the nature of creativity and innovation through iterative learning from the descriptions of the interviewees and the subjective experiences gathered.

Research limitations/implications

The underlying phenomenological study is limited to male haute cuisine chefs in five European countries. Future research is planned including female and male chefs from other countries in order to learn whether similar empirical findings can be obtained.

Practical implications

The paper presents a research process for elucidating cognitive and nebulous phenomena such as creativity and innovation to make them accessible to managers, researchers, students and policy makers.

Originality/value

The findings explain the process of elucidating the nature of creativity and innovation through iterative learning from the descriptions of the interviewees and the subjective experiences gathered. Further conceptual and methodological development emerges from investigating interviewees representative of the notion of the extraordinary.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2019

Angelo Presenza and Antonio Messeni Petruzzelli

The purpose of this paper is to shed new light on the role of country of origin (COO) for the competitiveness of luxury restaurants. The main goal is to understand how an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed new light on the role of country of origin (COO) for the competitiveness of luxury restaurants. The main goal is to understand how an haute cuisine (HC) chef can develop a personal cooking style and language based on the exploitation of COO in such a highly institutionalized field.

Design/methodology/approach

A single case study methodology is applied based on the analysis of the Italian HC chef Niko Romito.

Findings

Findings of this paper highlight the existence of pervasive use of strategies based on the search, recombination and codification of procedure that take direct inspiration by national and regional traditional gastronomic resources and recipes.

Research limitations/implications

Research implications refer to the interpretation of how a chef can work by formulating and developing competitive strategies through the recombination, reinterpretation and codification of local and typical gastronomic resources and cooking recipes.

Practical implications

The paper provides managerial insights into the relative effectiveness to use COO as a strategic resource for HC restaurants.

Originality/value

A model is presented and the three gears that form the COO chain of chef Romito are explained. This model will help academics and practitioners to better understand the ways need to be followed to improve firms’ competitiveness fostering COO.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Bernard Surlemont, Diego Chantrain, Frédéric Nlemvo and Colin Johnson

The aim of this paper to shed light on the strategies adopted by chefs and to identify the most successful in terms of Michelin rating and profitability.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper to shed light on the strategies adopted by chefs and to identify the most successful in terms of Michelin rating and profitability.

Design/methodology/approach

In‐depth exploratory interviews with 20 great chefs located in France, Belgium, the UK and Switzerland having gained two or three Michelin stars over the last ten years.

Findings

Chefs use three different strategies for revenue‐generation: core business, full diversification and partial diversification. The reasoning behind the choice of strategy varies between two‐ and three‐star restaurants. The first strategy seems to lead to higher Michelin star ratings, and strategy, the second seems superior in terms of profitability. The third strategy yields inferior results, but is less risky.

Research limitations/implications

The observations are constrained to “recently successful” restaurants, and hence may not be applicable to longer‐standing restaurants.

Practical implications

Concentrating on the core business leads to higher star rating, but lower profitability. Full diversification increases profitability but can jeopardize Michelin rating. The middle‐of‐the‐road approach seems inferior in any case.

Originality/value

To this day, little research has been conducted on the way in which great chefs having two or three stars in the famed Michelin Red Guide run their businesses. In particular, very little is known about their revenue‐generating strategies: what options are available and which revenue models are the “best”. This paper is exploratory in nature and aims to inform further research about luxury restaurants.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1994

Cailein H. Gillespie

Defines the term “gastrosophy” and focuses on “chef gastrosophers” whosespecialist field is professional expertise in gastronomy andhospitality. The position these…

Abstract

Defines the term “gastrosophy” and focuses on “chef gastrosophers” whose specialist field is professional expertise in gastronomy and hospitality. The position these individuals occupy today has been brought about by a succession of cultural, metaphysical and technological factors. Chef gastrosophers have progressed the aims of gastronomy, by becoming leading figures in contemporary cuisine. They occupy positions at the apex of the modern culinary hierarchy, having demonstrated individualism, entrepreneurship and a willingness to take risks. They set the culinary pace of the hospitality industry, and have invested in the cult of personality, freely utilizing public relations and image creation techniques. Chef gastrosophers have realized that the modern hospitality industry has a dynamic which requires the business proprietor to innovate, to create bold images and identities and to market these. The hospitality they offer is intended to be holistic, where a complete experience, offering fleeting artistic theatre, has been distilled from haute cuisine.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 96 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Arnaldo Ryngelblum, Nadia Vianna and Luciana Onusic

The purpose of this paper is to examine the conditions that allow the co-existence of alternative logics in an institutional field for an extended period.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the conditions that allow the co-existence of alternative logics in an institutional field for an extended period.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a case study that examined the complaint-handling processes of phone companies based on documentary research, which provided the information that allowed the development of a script to interview organizational actors in this field.

Findings

The explanation for this behavior that does not attempt to deinstitutionalize other institutions’ practices relates to the actors’ need for the other field participants’ collaboration to improve their activities.

Research limitations/implications

The specific characteristics of the Brazilian context can only suggest that alternative logics may coexist, which therefore opens opportunities for future studies to discuss the possible reproduction of these results in other societies. Similarly, because this research was restricted to the complaint field, other studies conducted in fields where actors are faced with alternative possibilities, such as with the judicial system, should examine and expand on these concepts. This study sought to cover the viewpoints of multiple important actors in the field to cover the whys and hows these logics coexist. However, a more comprehensive availability of respondents might have brought still better insights to the study.

Practical implications

One implication of this study is the fact that firms in Brazil must be aware of the alternative redress channels that are available to consumers. The different procedural norms can cause a great deal of annoyance because firms have to be updated with all of them and eventually build specialized teams to address them. The awareness of the existence of multiple logics in this field should orient the Brazilian telephony industry’s regulator in formulating policies that take this fact into consideration. To do this, the regulator should consider a regular consultation forum in which the main consumer protection organizations and government agencies gather to discuss improvements given that there is already informal collaboration. Public policy should also take into consideration the fact that consumers do not complain most of the time for lack of knowledge or disbelief in supporting organizations.

Originality/value

The main contribution is the alternative logics notion in addressing complaints in this field. This is an issue that has not been practically explored in the literature. The difference between an alternative logic and a competing one lies in the fact that the practices, structures and symbols in the first case represent alternative possibilities for actors to achieve a specific objective, whereas in the second case, the weaker logics tend to disappear due to a stronger one.

Details

Management Research: The Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Peter Björk and Hannele Kauppinen-Räisänen

To provide insights into holiday well-being, the purpose of this paper is to examine two inevitable traveller activities related to destinations’ gastronomy: pre-trip food…

Abstract

Purpose

To provide insights into holiday well-being, the purpose of this paper is to examine two inevitable traveller activities related to destinations’ gastronomy: pre-trip food information sourcing and the daily meals consumed.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was carried out among 243 Finnish travellers. The findings are based on univariate analysis (t-test, ANOVA and regression analysis).

Findings

Pre-trip behaviour to ensure holiday well-being is based on travellers’ interests in food, an emotional desire for a sense of safety and a functional desire for convenience, while they collect information from the internet and guidebooks about recommended food places and local food as well as food safety and price level. Travellers’ place the highest importance on dinner for their holiday well-being, especially foodies – those travellers with a keen interest in food. Breakfast is the second most important meal contributing to holiday well-being.

Practical implications

These findings inform destination marketing organisations about what food dimensions they should emphasise in destination gastronomy-related marketing communication for tour operators and hotel and local restaurants about the essence of dinner and breakfast for holiday well-being.

Originality/value

The study provides insights into the role of destinations’ gastronomy in holiday well-being, which deserves to be studied in the current era of experiences and food interest.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Tommaso Savino, Antonio Messeni Petruzzelli and Vito Albino

Into cultural and creative industries, the innovation is increasingly realized by a lead creator which is supported by a specific team. Hence, this paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

Into cultural and creative industries, the innovation is increasingly realized by a lead creator which is supported by a specific team. Hence, this paper aims to understand the composition of this particular team.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted an in-depth case study of “Dal Pescatore”. This is the Italian restaurant keeping the highest award previewed by Michelin Guide from the longer period. The main figures of the restaurant are the head chefs (Nadia and Giovanni Santini) who are continually supported by a dedicated team

Findings

The analysis underlines the necessity to create a team which combines aged people linked to firms’ tradition with a low percentage of young foreign apprentices. If the old-timer member assures a deep understanding of the firm’s knowledge base, the young foreign apprentice can show an high learning attitude through which he/she more easily shares their different knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

This study discussed organizational efforts to foster innovation capacities of the main individuals into a firm. However, the present research suffers from some limitations which limits the generalizability of the results beyond the company studied: a single case study on a small and family firm with consolidated organizational routines. In addition, this research does not solutions about the mechanisms of interaction among these different team members.

Originality/value

Recent studies observed how a number of cultural and creative firms innovate through a particular team that develops the ideas of a lead creator. Nevertheless, despite the increasing importance of these teams, their composition remains unclear.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

John Cooper, Charalampos Giousmpasoglou and Evangelia Marinakou

The purpose of this study is to conceptualise how the occupational identity and culture of chefs is constructed and maintained through both work and social interaction.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to conceptualise how the occupational identity and culture of chefs is constructed and maintained through both work and social interaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The study follows a qualitative interpretivist approach; in total, 54 unstructured, in-depth, face-to-face interviews were conducted with Michelin-starred chefs in Great Britain and Ireland.

Findings

Drawing upon the fieldwork, fresh insights into the social structures and processes which underpin the creation and maintenance of the occupational identity and culture of chefs are revealed in the chefs’ own words.

Research limitations/implications

This study generates empirical data that inform contemporary debates about the role of work in identity formation with particular emphasis on the induction–socialisation process. In addition, the findings of this study suggest that identity and culture are interrelated in the sense that the cultural components of an occupational culture operate to reinforce a sense of identity among its occupational members.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that Michelin-starred chefs have a strong occupational identity and culture. Strict rules and discipline are often used in kitchen brigades as a means of monitoring quality and maintaining the high standards of performance. The occupational socialisation of new members is a long and painful process that very often exceeds the limits of banter, and it is analogous to the military induction. The phenomenon of bullying and violence in commercial kitchens is identified as an unacceptable behaviour that needs to be eliminated. This can be achieved with changes in the education and training of the young chefs and the strict enforcement of the anti-bullying policies.

Originality/value

The understanding of chefs’ occupational identity and culture is critical for successful hospitality operations; nevertheless, this is an under-researched area. This study is unique in terms of scale and depth; it is expected to provide useful insights in both theoretical and practical perspective, regarding the formation of chefs’ identity and culture in organisational settings.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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