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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1989

Edmund J. Gubbins and Peter Hancox

The aim of the common transport policy of the EEC and the reasonsfor the slow progress to date are discussed. Harmonisation of regulationand competition policy are…

Abstract

The aim of the common transport policy of the EEC and the reasons for the slow progress to date are discussed. Harmonisation of regulation and competition policy are important issues in the cabotage debate and are examined. Cabotage is defined and the effect of the proposals on member states outlined. The results of structured interviews with hauliers, trade associations and trade unions give an overview of the likely impact on the main organisations involved in the industry.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

Edmund J. Gubbins and Peter Hancox

The aim of the common transport policy of the EEC and the reasonsfor the slow progress to date are discussed. Harmonisation of regulationand competition policy are…

Abstract

The aim of the common transport policy of the EEC and the reasons for the slow progress to date are discussed. Harmonisation of regulation and competition policy are important issues in the cabotage debate and are examined. Cabotage is defined and the effect of the proposals on member states outlined. The results of structured interviews with hauliers, trade associations and trade unions give an overview of the likely impact on the main organisations involved in the industry.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 90 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

James L. Whyte

The UK market for freight transport services used to becharacterized by buyer inertia and high levels of source loyalty. Forthe last decade, suppliers of freight transport…

Abstract

The UK market for freight transport services used to be characterized by buyer inertia and high levels of source loyalty. For the last decade, suppliers of freight transport services have been operating in competitive markets in which supply has exceeded demand. Simultaneously attitudes to distribution management have been changing. Although transport costs account for a large percentage of total distribution costs, little is known of the effect of these changed attitudes on this function and on the nature of the relationships between buyers and suppliers. Using the Interaction Model of the IMP Group as a conceptual framework for the research, reports the results of a survey of transport managers conducted in Scotland, a coherent geographical region within the United Kingdom. Contains tables showing the distributions of ages and years of experience of transport buyers, their qualifications, the annual sum spent on transport and the contribution of the cost of haulage to the final cost of the major product transported, the frequency with which transport cost information goes to senior management and transport managers′ assessments of their firm′s senior management′s attitudes to distribution. Shows that transport managers have a higher status in their organizations than before and greater independence of decision making. Provides profiles of the transport manager′s job in companies with an “advanced” and “traditional” approach to distribution. These changes in the characteristics of transport managers and in the organizational factors which influence their behaviour are important to hauliers, as they affect both the nature and the duration of the relationship between buyer and supplier and the determinants of haulier selection.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

James L. Whyte

In the UK the last decade has been a period in which the supply offreight transport services has generally exceeded demand, while both thecharacteristics of the transport…

Abstract

In the UK the last decade has been a period in which the supply of freight transport services has generally exceeded demand, while both the characteristics of the transport managers, who are the industry′s customers, and organizational variables, which affect their behaviour, have changed. Examines how these changes have altered the duration of relationships with hauliers, the factors which determine haulier selection and the relative importance of the different aspects of service provided by hauliers. Shows that, although buyers value long‐term relationships, they are more active in the market than they were, dropping many and taking on new hauliers where appropriate. While service remains the most important selection determinant, price has become a factor of major importance. Furthermore, the relative importance of the different aspects of service has changed, with “flexibility” and “understanding of problems” ranking above some of the more traditional variables. While buyers perceive themselves as demanding customers, they attempt to manage their relationships with suppliers by creating an atmosphere which emphasizes collaboration. Concludes with recommendations for suppliers and with a discussion of the relevance of the IMP Group′s Interaction Model to the freight transport market.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2020

Henrik S. Sternberg, Erik Hofmann and Robert E. Overstreet

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impacts of the ongoing freight market deregulation in the European Union (EU). Specifically, this case study focuses on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impacts of the ongoing freight market deregulation in the European Union (EU). Specifically, this case study focuses on cabotage penetration rates in Germany, the largest logistics market in Europe. In light of the upcoming trade barriers, we intend to move this topic forward by emphasising its interdisciplinary nature.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the analysis of Eurostat data, expert interviews and a review of related literature, we elaborate and discuss four propositions related to the factors affecting cabotage penetration, future cabotage levels and the effects on modal split and empty runs.

Findings

We found that cabotage in Germany plays a more important role than officially reported and has increased drastically since 2008. Given our analysis, increased cabotage penetration seems to thwart efforts within the EU to promote a modal shift from road to rail and increased national empty runs are the future outcome of current regulations. In Germany, the cabotage share is likely to reach 16% in the next five years.

Research limitations/implications

This paper highlights the need for incorporating a more contextual understanding in freight carrier selection theory development in general as well as country-specific investigations in particular.

Practical implications

Logistics managers and policymakers looking at future strategies are advised to take the ongoing deregulation trend into consideration. European freight movement using cabotage operators may represent significant cost savings; however, these cost savings come at an environmental and social sustainability price as the modal shift to rail and fill rates suffer.

Originality/value

This paper represents an empirical and unbiased point of view, in contrast to the reports of the European Commission (pro-deregulation) or the reports of the haulage associations and labour unions (anti-deregulation).

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Alan Collins, Maeve Henchion and Paul O’Reilly

The Irish food industry is of significant importance to the Irish economy. Given its dependence on UK multiple retailers, their supply chain management practices have…

Abstract

The Irish food industry is of significant importance to the Irish economy. Given its dependence on UK multiple retailers, their supply chain management practices have considerable implications for the whole of the Irish economy. Retailers’ attempts at improving efficiency at their regional distribution centres have resulted in the growing use of consolidation centres whereby food products from several manufacturers are consolidated into full loads for delivery into RDCs. Results of three case studies suggest that the use of a particular form of consolidation (i.e. coupled‐consolidation where in‐bound logistics are coupled with consolidation services) results in the imposition of costs, especially in terms of lost flexibility, to food manufacturers. The distribution of these costs is asymmetric, with smaller firms bearing the greater costs.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1975

M.T. Cunningham and K. Kettlewood

The freight transport market in the UK has been increasing at a rate of between 1 and 2% p.a. since the mid 1960 a s measured by total ton‐miles and it is worth some…

Abstract

The freight transport market in the UK has been increasing at a rate of between 1 and 2% p.a. since the mid 1960 a s measured by total ton‐miles and it is worth some £1,500 million annually. The freight business of British Rail, which accounts for approximately 20% of the total market size is of particular importance to the financial viability of the railways as a whole, owing to the fact that freight traditionally has generated about 40% of the revenue of British Rail and difficulty has been experienced in operating it at a sufficiently profitable level to provide for essential re‐investment in the business. This lack of profitability caused consideration to be given to the possibility of withdrawing altogether from the market for freight traffic in less than train‐loads but this was rejected on the grounds that freigh traffic shares assets such as track, signalling, locomotives and manpower with other rail services. A withdrawal from the smaller “wagon load” traffic would reduce traffic by nearly 50% and lead to an under‐utilisation of assets thus weakening overall rail profitability.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0020-7527

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1970

Robert Nix

Analyses the freightliner container system with the inception of British Rail's development of its land‐based system. Examines, from the point of view of new product…

Abstract

Analyses the freightliner container system with the inception of British Rail's development of its land‐based system. Examines, from the point of view of new product marketing, the development of freightliner marketing strategies. Purports that it is clear that the railway can in no sense be regarded as a monopoly concern in freight transport, as British Rail's main competitor is the road haulier – although coastal shipping, and firms operating their own road vehicles, are major competitors for certain types of traffic. Discusses the various types of licence used, for the different weights of transport involved. Contends that the freightliner system is a very effective mode of transport over long distances, and it will assume an increasingly important role in the changing distributive requirements of industry.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Fredrik Ralf Nilsson, Henrik Sternberg and Thorsten Klaas-Wissing

The purpose of this paper is to explore the environmental impact of logistics service provider (LSP) activities in the light of customer priorities and the fragmentation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the environmental impact of logistics service provider (LSP) activities in the light of customer priorities and the fragmentation of the road haulage industry in Europe. It also explores the extent to which LSPs can actually monitor the environmental impact of logistics activities in the supply chain (SC).

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a narrative literature review, an interview study, a case survey and three in-depth case studies. A framework on sustainability challenges in SCs, derived from the literature, is used to structure and analyse the findings.

Findings

Despite the ambitious environmental schemes communicated by several LSPs, they show little interest in, and exert little control over, the actual emissions generated from their transport operations. It is clear from the results that any real concern from customers for environmental solutions which negatively influence the cost and time requirements of logistics services is not yet a reality.

Research limitations/implications

This paper implies that LSP sustainability cannot be investigated in isolation if a company does not manage its proprietary resources (like owning trucks and employing drivers), but rather engage subcontractors.

Practical implications

Environmental policies among different LSPs appear to be similar as policies, but differ in practice. This variation of practices emphasises the importance of follow-up control by environmentally aware buyers of logistics services.

Originality/value

This paper represents a novel approach as to how LSP environmental policies should be viewed. It highlights the concrete need for action to achieve the environmental targets of 2020 and 2050 for carbon emissions from road transportation.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Malcolm Robert Victor Goodman

Offers a positive example of how small firms can benefit from low cost qualitative market research techniques to determine achievable advantageous marketing strategies…

Abstract

Offers a positive example of how small firms can benefit from low cost qualitative market research techniques to determine achievable advantageous marketing strategies. The issue of identifying “customer perceived value” was chosen as the prime focus. The experimental Pilot Programme featured a series of depth interviews and a focus group session. The research benefited from the inclusion of some classical creative problem‐solving techniques. Preliminary concerns that the research would breach the boundaries of academic rigour and that the depth interview interviewee samples would be too small for any significant findings to emerge proved unfounded. The success of the experiment (judged by the small businesses, in terms of its relevance in enabling them both to draft action marketing plans and to manage customer value) has prompted the local support agencies to provide a low cost qualitative market research service using similar qualitative research techniques as the experimental programme.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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