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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2021

Simeon Babatunde, Hatem El-Gohary and David Edwards

With the growth of entrepreneurship education adoption in higher education institutions (HEIs), the importance of assessments as a tool to gauge and enhance learning is of…

Abstract

Purpose

With the growth of entrepreneurship education adoption in higher education institutions (HEIs), the importance of assessments as a tool to gauge and enhance learning is of utmost importance. The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence and appropriateness of current assessment methods for engineering and technology students in Nigerian and British HEIs.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs a qualitative research method with a case study approach to investigate the impact and suitability of assessment methods currently used within entrepreneurship education in Nigeria and England.

Findings

The results reveal that lecturers across both countries believed that assessment methods currently in use were appropriate, but were not uniform in its influence on learning. However, students were unanimous in that most assessment methods currently used were not effective at enhancing their learning, not very appropriate, and were not a good judge of their work and effort. The results were used in building a framework to understand the importance of assessment methods in entrepreneurship education.

Originality/value

In light of the inadequate literature, this paper covers an acute gap in the field. This will allow policymakers and different interested parties to reassess the development of suitable assessment methods to involve students as key stakeholders.

Details

Education + Training, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2018

De-Graft Owusu-Manu, David John Edwards, A.S. Kukah, Erika Anneli Parn, Hatem El-Gohary and M. Reza Hosseini

Failures of public–private partnership (PPP) projects are often ascribed to the agency problem, which arise under conditions of inadequate and asymmetric information when…

Abstract

Purpose

Failures of public–private partnership (PPP) projects are often ascribed to the agency problem, which arise under conditions of inadequate and asymmetric information when a principal (the client) hires an agent (the contractor). This paper aims to identify the causes and effects of moral hazard and adverse selection on PPP construction projects using a synthesis of extant literature (to determine key variables) and analysis of survey questionnaire data collected.

Design/methodology/approach

Mean score ranking was used to rank the causes and effects of moral hazard and adverse selection problems in PPP construction projects. One sample t-test was conducted to establish the relative significance of these variables.

Findings

Effort dimensions (which are not verifiable), low transfer of risk, lack of accurate information about project conditions, wrong party chosen to execute project and renegotiation of contracts were the most significant causes of moral hazard and adverse selection problems in PPP construction projects. In addition, reduction of competition, high transaction costs, consequences on profitability of project, siphoning of funds and negative implications on enforceability of contract were the most significant effects of moral hazard and adverse selection problems in PPP construction projects.

Practical implications

Application of these findings will help mitigating moral hazard and adverse selection problems occurring when undertaking PPP construction projects.

Originality/value

Research findings provide guidance to construction stakeholders in the PPP sector on the different causes and effects of adverse selection and moral hazard. This pioneering study is the first to conduct an empirical assessment of the causes and effects of moral hazard and adverse selection of PPP construction projects in a developing country.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2018

De-Graft Owusu-Manu, A.S. Kukah, David John Edwards, Erika Anneli Pärn, Hatem El-Gohary and Clinton Aigbavboa

The purpose of this paper was to assess the causal relationship(s) between moral hazard and adverse selection of public–private partnership (PPP) construction projects…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to assess the causal relationship(s) between moral hazard and adverse selection of public–private partnership (PPP) construction projects. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to explore the cause and effect relationship between moral hazard and adverse selection problems in PPP construction projects in Ghana. The study produced a framework to predict, estimate and depict the complex causal relationships (i.e. the directionality) between moral hazard and adverse selection.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the proposed framework, a quantitative methodology was used, in which, data were collected using research questionnaires that targeted a sample of 280 PPP stakeholders in Ghana. In total, 210 useable questionnaires were retrieved, representing a response rate of 75 per cent.

Findings

The interrelationships between the eight causes and the nine effects of moral hazard and adverse selection were established using the model. The tested framework showed the degree of association and isolation of the unobserved variables on the indicator factors. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to evaluate the fit of items to latent constructs. Because the fit of each model was good and the item loadings were adequate, it was assumed that the indicators of the different variables factors were fitting. Furthermore, a diagnostic fit analysis was conducted using the robust maximum likelihood method to test the statistical significance of the parameter estimates.

Practical implications

This novel research is one of the few studies investigating the causal relationships between moral hazard and adverse selection of PPP construction projects. The research concluded with future studies that seek to validate the model developed in other countries and/or other industries.

Originality/value

The research findings will serve as a guide for construction stakeholders in the PPP sector on the causes and effects of adverse selection and moral hazard and how to mitigate these.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Ralf Jan Benjamin Van der Meij, David John Edwards, Chris Roberts, Hatem El-Gohary and John Posillico

A comprehensive literature review of performance management within the Dutch steel processing industry is presented. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the motives…

Abstract

Purpose

A comprehensive literature review of performance management within the Dutch steel processing industry is presented. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the motives for companies to become excellent performers in their field of expertise. These internal and external motives (refined by quantitative analysis of bibliographic data) sought to reveal the common factors that impact company performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Inductive reasoning was adopted using an interpretivist philosophical stance to generate new theoretical insight. A mixed-methods analysis of pertinent extant literature afforded greater synthesis of the research problem domain and generated more valid and reliable findings. The software visualisation of similarities viewer was used to conduct a qualitative bibliographic analysis of extant literature to yield greater clarification on the phenomena under investigation.

Findings

Four thematic groups of past research endeavours emerged from the analysis and were assigned appropriate nomenclature, namely: industry internal motives; industry external motives; excellent performer and incremental working method. To further expand upon the continuous improvement process (CIP – embodied within performance management), the paper describes the virtuous cycle of improvement, which consists of the consecutive steps of “planning”, “doing”, “checking” and ultimately of “acting” accordingly to the previous steps. It can be concluded that a high-performing company acts according to its mission, plans in line with the vision do as defined in the strategy and checks by reflection.

Originality/value

This unique study provides invaluable insight into the performance management of Dutch steel processing companies. Although the research context was narrowly defined, the findings presented are equally applicable to clients, contractors and sub-contractors active in other sectors of the construction industry. The research concludes by prescribing factors of mitigation strategies to support chief executive officers to focus on the optimum distribution of their scarce resources.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Henry Gyarteng-Mensah, De-Graft Owusu-Manu, David Edwards, Isaac Baidoo and Hatem El-Gohary

Using a discrete choice experiment (DCE), this study aims to better understand the job preference of postgraduate students studying at the Kwame Nkrumah University of…

Abstract

Purpose

Using a discrete choice experiment (DCE), this study aims to better understand the job preference of postgraduate students studying at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology-Institute of Distance Learning, Ghana and also rank the attributes of a job they deem important.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted a positivist epistemological design contextualised within a deductive approach and case study strategy. Primary survey data was collected from a stratified random sample of 128 postgraduate students with multi-sectorial career prospects. Sample students were subjected to a DCE in which their stated preferences were collected using closed-ended questionnaires with 28 pairs of hypothetical job profiles. Respondents’ preferences from the DCE data were then modelled using the conditional logit.

Findings

The research reveals that: salary in the range GHC 2,800.00 to GHC 3,400.00 ($1 = GHS 5.3); supportive management; very challenging jobs; and jobs located in the city were the top attributes that were significant and had the most impact in increasing the utility of selecting a particular job. Interestingly, jobs with no extra hours workload were not significant hence, had a negative impact upon student preferences.

Originality/value

This novel research is the first to use a DCE to better elicit preference and trade-offs of postgraduate students in a developing country towards varying job characteristics that have an impact on their future employment decisions. Knowledge advancements made provide invaluable insight to employers and policymakers on the key criteria that should be implemented to retain the best candidate.

Details

Journal of Humanities and Applied Social Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN:

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2020

Falaq Assad Nazir, David John Edwards, Mark Shelbourn, Igor Martek, Wellington Didibhuku Didibhuku Thwala and Hatem El-Gohary

Housing completions in the UK have fallen to 125,000 annually, while government targets have risen to 300,000. This dramatic shortfall raises concerns as to whether…

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Abstract

Purpose

Housing completions in the UK have fallen to 125,000 annually, while government targets have risen to 300,000. This dramatic shortfall raises concerns as to whether current traditional construction approaches remain appropriate. This study aims to compare the traditional approach with modular construction, with a view to assessing whether a shift in construction systems offers the potential to alleviate the UK's domestic housing crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive interpretivist review of the available relevant literature is undertaken on construction methods within the UK; advantages and disadvantages. A bibliometric analysis is conducted to extract trends and findings relevant to the comparison at hand. The database is Web of Science; the analysis software is the VOS viewer.

Findings

The research illustrates that the UK housing market is in a state of crisis. A toxic combination of a rising UK population combined falling rates of housing delivery has resulted in an ever-widening housing supply gap. The construction industry’s capacity to meet this observed dearth in supply is further exacerbated by a number of chronic factors such as: falling participation in the construction sector workforce; lowering skill levels; reducing profitability; time to delivery pressures; and cost blow-outs.

Originality/value

While much information on the various construction methods are available, including comparative material, this study is the first to assemble the various comparative parameters regarding traditional and modular UK residential construction in one place. Thus, this study provides a definitive assessment of the relative advantages and disadvantages of these forms of construction.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2019

Riyad Eid, Amgad Badewi, Hassan Selim and Hatem El-Gohary

The growing interest in the development of entrepreneurial intention (EI) that has increased the importance of theories that explain and anticipate the tendency among…

Abstract

Purpose

The growing interest in the development of entrepreneurial intention (EI) that has increased the importance of theories that explain and anticipate the tendency among individuals to start a new business. However, most of these theories focus on the relationship between entrepreneurs perceptions and their intention and ignore the cognitive and psychological characteristics that might configure their perceptions. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to integrate the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) with the entrepreneurial event model (EEM) and to extend the combined model to include the personality characteristics of an entrepreneur that might shape the perceptions and intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a sample of 688 senior university students (Emirati nationals, 91.2 per cent and expatriates, 8.8 per cent) and employs positivist research with a quantitative approach, adopting a survey strategy through questionnaires and structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results demonstrate the relevance and robustness of the suggested combined and extended model in the prediction of intention on the part of senior university students to become entrepreneurs (explained variance=73.3 per cent) based on survey data (2017; n = 688).

Originality/value

The main contribution of this paper lies not only in the integration of the TPB and the EEM, but also in extending the two theories on which it is based through adding entrepreneurial personality characteristics and an explanation of the mechanism through which entrepreneurial perceptions and EI develop.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 61 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2019

De-Graft Owusu-Manu, Richard Ohene Asiedu, David John Edwards, Kenneth Donkor-Hyiaman, Pius Akanbang Abuntori and Hatem El-Gohary

Credit market development requires appropriate credit assessment and default policies. This paper aims to examine the impact of household characteristics on mortgage…

Abstract

Purpose

Credit market development requires appropriate credit assessment and default policies. This paper aims to examine the impact of household characteristics on mortgage default, using survey data collected from Ghanaian financial institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered using semi-structured questionnaires from customers of five universal banks in Ghana. A logistic regression was used to model the determinants of credit default propensity.

Findings

Contrary to established knowledge, the study shows that females are more likely to default on credit than their male counterparts. This is even more likely if the female is older, unmarried, divorced and financially illiterate and has lower educational attainments. These factors are associated with lower earning capacity, which increases default tendencies. The findings confirm that price instability (typified by excessive movements in inflation and exchange rates in addition to low national savings rate) are adversely linked to credit defaults. Borrower’s perception of constraints to credit access (such as collateral requirements, interest rate and loan size) influence credit default. Banks should be encouraged to invest in the financial literacy skills development of their customers to mitigate credit default tendencies.

Social implications

The study is of practical value to credit officers and the development of the credit market in Ghana. A novel model is presented for assessing credit applications and developing credit default policies.

Originality/value

The research findings have not only expanded the frontiers of literature but also empirically examined the determinants of credit default propensity, which provides a basis for developing and improving credit default policy in the credit market.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2015

Abd El-Shafey I Ahmed, John N Hay and Hatem El-Gohary

Undoubtedly, saving the environment and avoiding environmental damage is one of the major challenges facing any government. The purpose of this paper is to add to the…

Abstract

Purpose

Undoubtedly, saving the environment and avoiding environmental damage is one of the major challenges facing any government. The purpose of this paper is to add to the accumulative knowledge in the field through investigating the different factors affecting the adoption of newly developed water filters by Egyptian farmers to reduce the massive air pollution resulting from burning rice straw. Such investigation will help in achieving a deep and reflective understanding of current adoption practises by Egyptian farmers.

Design/methodology/approach

To understand the different factors that might have an impact on the adoption of newly developed water filters by Egyptians, a survey research strategy as well as a focus groups mechanism were conducted employing triangulation methodology in which quantitative and qualitative data were collected based on a post-positives approach. This quantitative study was performed in five local councils in Al-Sharqiyah Governorate, one of the biggest governorates in rice production in Egypt, based on a questionnaire built on some parameters related to Egyptian farmers’ perceptions of clean water. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences to analyse the collected data and evaluate the ability to promote the newly developed filters.

Findings

The findings indicated that the adoption of water filters by Egyptian farmers is affected by two groups of factors, namely personal factors and water-related factors. With regard to this, it was found that age, cost, farmers’ attitudes towards using water filters, farmers’ trust in the water pipes systems, and the usefulness of the filters have a positive impact on water filters adoption by Egyptian farmers. The findings also indicate that water filters adoption by Egyptian farmers has a positive impact on a farmer’s intention to buy a water filter and their intention to share a water filter with others.

Research limitations/implications

The paper will provide great benefits for entrepreneurs, policy makers, practitioners, and researchers though providing a clearer view and deep understanding for the issues related to different factors affecting the adoption of newly developed water filters by Egyptian farmers.

Originality/value

This research adds to the relatively limited empirical research that has been conducted on water management in south Mediterranean counties. Moreover, the findings and results of this study will provide great assistance and benefit to business owners, practitioners and governmental agencies concerned with water management in south Mediterranean countries since it reveals a number of dynamics and potential scenarios that should be taken into consideration.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2013

Hatem El-Gohary, David Edwards, Riyad Eid and Juanling Huang

The purpose of this paper is to add to the accumulative knowledge in the field through investigating the different factors affecting the choice of export entry mode by…

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2014

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to add to the accumulative knowledge in the field through investigating the different factors affecting the choice of export entry mode by Egyptian SMEs. An organised examination of the literature related to export entry modes by SMEs is discussed to provide and develop a clear understanding about the different factors affecting the choice of export entry mode by Egyptian SMEs. Such investigation will help in achieving a deep and reflective understanding of current exporting practises by Egyptian SMEs. The findings indicated that there is very few research studies in the literature related to the choice of export entry mode in developing countries in general and there was no published studies related to the choice of export entry mode in Egypt.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the published literature related to choice of export entry mode by SMEs in general and to SMEs in developing countries (e.g. Egypt) in particular. Based on this review and the results of two focus groups, the paper validates a conceptual model utilising a positivist research philosophy with a quantitative approach, in which quantitative data are collected based on survey strategy through questionnaires to address different levels of the study.

Findings

The findings showed that Egyptian SMEs owners, marketing and sales managers have a limited knowledge in relation to the different available export entry modes. The findings also illustrated that SME internal factors, local market factors and target market factors have different impacts on the choice of export entry mode and that only small number of Egyptian SMEs conducted an effective and efficient export activities.

Research limitations/implications

The paper will provide great benefits for entrepreneurs, policy makers, practitioners, researchers and educators though providing a clearer view and deep understanding for the issues related to different factors affecting the choice of export entry mode by Egyptian SMEs.

Originality/value

The paper adds to the extremely limited number of empirical studies that has been conducted to investigate different factors affecting the choice of export entry mode by Egyptian and Developing Economies SMEs. Depending on this research, researchers and scholars in the field can have a clearer view to set their attitude towards suitable future research studies which in turn will contribute to the related accumulated knowledge in the field.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

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