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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Victoria Uren, Daniel Wright, James Scott, Yulan He and Hassan Saif

This paper aims to address the following challenge: the push to widen participation in public consultation suggests social media as an additional mechanism through which…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address the following challenge: the push to widen participation in public consultation suggests social media as an additional mechanism through which to engage the public. Bioenergy companies need to build their capacity to communicate in these new media and to monitor the attitudes of the public and opposition organizations towards energy development projects.

Design/methodology/approach

This short paper outlines the planning issues bioenergy developments face and the main methods of communication used in the public consultation process in the UK. The potential role of social media in communication with stakeholders is identified. The capacity of sentiment analysis to mine opinions from social media is summarised and illustrated using a sample of tweets containing the term “bioenergy”.

Findings

Social media have the potential to improve information flows between stakeholders and developers. Sentiment analysis is a viable methodology, which bioenergy companies should be using to measure public opinion in the consultation process. Preliminary analysis shows promising results.

Research limitations/implications

Analysis is preliminary and based on a small dataset. It is intended only to illustrate the potential of sentiment analysis and not to draw general conclusions about the bioenergy sector.

Social implications

Social media have the potential to open access to the consultation process and help bioenergy companies to make use of waste for energy developments.

Originality/value

Opinion mining, though established in marketing and political analysis, is not yet systematically applied as a planning consultation tool. This is a missed opportunity.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Prasanta Kumar Dey

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Abstract

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Abdulazeez Y.H. Saif-Alyousfi and Asish Saha

This paper aims to examine the effect of bank-specific, financial structure and macroeconomic factors on the risk-taking behavior, stability and profitability of banks in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the effect of bank-specific, financial structure and macroeconomic factors on the risk-taking behavior, stability and profitability of banks in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) economies during 1998–2017.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a two-step system generalized method of moments dynamic model to analyze the data.

Findings

The results show that non-traditional activities increase the risk and decrease the stability and profitability of banks that are highly capitalized, highly liquid and large. Banks in this group are less engaged in securities investments and their higher degree of loan exposure leads to a decrease in risk and an increase in their stability and profitability. Higher concentration increases the risk and decreases the stability and profitability of banks that are less capitalized, less liquid and small. Banks with a higher share of non-traditional activities are riskier and less stable and less profitable before the financial crisis. The study finds that banks with relatively higher capitalization and high lending growth rates are riskier, profitable and less stable during the crisis. Larger commercial banks are less risky and more stable and profitable than smaller banks before the global financial crisis. Islamic banks performed better in terms of fee income, capitalization, liquidity, asset quality and have higher market concentration than conventional banks.

Originality/value

The study provides the first comprehensive empirical evidence on the drivers of risk-taking behavior, stability and profitability of the GCC banks. It also investigates the differences across these variables based on the characteristics of financial strength such as capitalization, liquidity and size; before, during and after the financial crisis; and differences between Islamic and conventional banks.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Sulaiman Abdullah Saif Al-Nasser Mohammed and Datin Joriah Muhammed

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the performance of Islamic banks in developing countries from 2007 to 2010 which includes the period of the financial crisis by…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the performance of Islamic banks in developing countries from 2007 to 2010 which includes the period of the financial crisis by empirically examining the way in which the macroeconomy affected Islamic banking performance (IBP) in developing countries. The empirical examination involves two approaches of measuring performance: Sharia-based and conventional-based performance measurement.

Design/methodology/approach

For this paper, the authors have utilized a Data Stream/Bank Scope database and data from the Bank Negara Malaysia (Malaysian Central Bank) to collect a panel set of annual financial information for Islamic banking from the year 2007-2010. The initial sample covers 34 Islamic banks from developing countries that are listed on the International Islamic Service Board. Furthermore, the authors adopted only those listed Islamic banks to tackle the data availability issue. The authors’ final sample comprised 136 observations with complete data as the numbers of Islamic banks in developing countries are low in comparison to their conventional peers. The financial crisis dummy follows America’s commonly used National Bureau of Economic Research timeline for the financial crisis. The authors also used the method of a generalized least square (GLS) method of pooled panel data analysis regression model. The rationale for employing the GLS technique was made on the basis of the ability of GLS to give less weight to the error term that is closely clustered around the mean, to improve the goodness of fit and to remove autocorrelation compared with normal, random, and fixed effect models.

Findings

The authors of this paper found that the macroeconomic factors reflected in gross domestic product, gross domestic product growth, and inflation rate have a significant positive relationship with the return on assets. In addition, a significant negative relationship was found between the financial dummy and IBP in developing countries. On the other hand, it failed to find evidence of a relationship between the macroeconomic factors and performance including the legal system and the financial crisis dummy, when the performance is reflected by the Zakat ratio. The result embedded that the financial crisis had an impact on the performance of Islamic banks in developing countries when viewed from the conventional banking perspective. The financial crisis played a role in reducing the profitability of Islamic banks which is consistent with a previous study by Hasan and Dridi (2011). However, in the view of Sharia, the financial crisis did not have any effect on IBP; even the macro factors did not have any effect on the level of performance.

Research limitations/implications

There are possible explanations for these contradictory coefficient signs. First, the contradictory signs of the coefficient for the same independent variable that was regressed with different dependent variables show that researchers would need to take caution in using the right indicators when measuring IBP. Conventional indicators bring different results in comparison to Islamic indicators (Badreldin, 2009; Mudiarasan. Kuppusamy, 2010; Zahra and Pearce, 1989). Second, Richard et al. (2009), having reviewed performance measurement-related publications in five of the leading management journals (722 articles between 2005 and 2007), suggested that the past studies reveal a multidimensional conceptualization of organizational performance with limited effectiveness of commonly accepted measurement practices. Accordingly, these studies call for more theoretically grounded research and debate for establishing which measures are appropriate in a given research context. Today, there is a general consensus that the old financial measures are still valid and relevant (Yip et al., 2009). However, these need to be balanced with more contemporary, intangible, and externally oriented measures. It has been argued that various researchers working in their own disciplines using functional performance measures (such as market share in marketing, schedule adherence in operations and so on) ought to link their discipline to focused performance measures of overall organizational performance.

Practical implications

Islamic banking has unique characteristics in comparison to conventional banking and this paper examines the differences between the two and also investigates the resilience of Islamic banks during a period of economic turbulence. Furthermore, due to these unique characteristics, a comparison cannot be made by using the conventional performance measures alone. In addition, amid the in-depth studies examining the resilience of Islamic banks during periods of economic crises, there are instances of theoretical disagreement in the extant empirical literature examining finance and economics. In that regard, the majority of the existing literature is either based on advanced markets or countries where the majority of the population practices the faith of Islam, and little is known about the performance of Islamic banking from the pooled emerging markets; particularly in developing countries.

Originality/value

Introducing Zakat as a performance measurement in Islamic banking context relating it to macroeconomic factors enhances the thinking of new research in Islamic theory about bank performance.

Open Access

Abstract

Details

Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Gulf Perspectives, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-5504

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2020

Abdallah Alsaad, Abdulazeez Y.H. Saif-Alyousfi and Hamzah Elrehail

The cognitive processes through which religiosity and idealism affect ethical consumption have received little attention in prior research. This study aims to explore the…

Abstract

Purpose

The cognitive processes through which religiosity and idealism affect ethical consumption have received little attention in prior research. This study aims to explore the influence of religiosity and idealism on ethical purchasing intention through moral obligation and perceived customer effectiveness (PCE).

Design/methodology/approach

The study analyses data from 149 Muslim participants in Saudi Arabia, using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results reveal that religiosity leads to PCE but not to moral obligation and that idealism leads to both PCE and moral obligation. Mediation analysis indicated that PCE mediates the effect of both religiosity and idealism, although moral obligation only mediates the effect of idealism.

Research limitations/implications

This research enriches the understanding of ethical consumption and contributes to the debate on how religiosity and idealism affect ethical consumption. It also has significant implications for theory and the development of sustainable marketing initiatives. Marketing campaigns and other promotional activities may focus on the interconnection between ethical purchase and the religious and ideology dimensions of consumers. Also, while formulating a communication strategy, it is necessary to emphasize the religious dimension of the sustainable use of the product.

Originality/value

Moral obligation and PCE have been shown as cognitive and psychological mechanisms explaining the links between religiosity or idealism and ethical purchasing behaviour.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Abdulazeez Y.H. Saif-Alyousfi, Asish Saha and Rohani Md-Rus

The purpose of this paper is to examine and compare the impact of oil and gas prices shocks on the non-performing loans (NPLs) of banks at the aggregate as well as at the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine and compare the impact of oil and gas prices shocks on the non-performing loans (NPLs) of banks at the aggregate as well as at the level of commercial and Islamic banks in Qatar over the period 2000-2016.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the West Texas Intermediate Database, BankScope Database, World Bank’s World Development Indicators Database, and International Monetary Fund Database, the authors use a one-step system generalized method of moments dynamic model to examine and compare the association between oil and gas prices shocks with NPLs in Qatari banks. The authors also test the hypotheses of direct and indirect impacts of oil price shocks and gas price shocks on bank NPLs.

Findings

The results indicate that oil price shocks and gas price shocks do not have directly affect NPLs of Qatari banks at the aggregate level, while they have indirect effects that are channeled through the country-specific macroeconomic and institutional factors. The authors find that oil and gas prices shocks affect NPLs of Qatari Islamic banks directly through extended oil and gas-related cash flows, while their impact on the NPLs of Qatari commercial banks is indirect. In other words, Islamic banks in Qatar greatly benefits from increased cash flow caused by the rise in the oil and gas prices, which make their NPLs, much lower than that in commercial banks. Better capital cushion, better managerial efficiency, better risk management, and liquidity management systems should be used by the Islamic banks in Qatar to expand their customer base. The authors also find that positive fiscal stance of the government reduces the NPLs in both commercial and Islamic banks.

Practical implications

The results of this study necessitate policy measures that can counter the effects of changes in oil and gas prices on the growth of bank NPLs.

Originality/value

It is widely recognized that oil and gas prices and the level of production are of great importance to the economic development of oil and gas-exporting countries. So far, however, no econometric study has been reported in the literature which analyses and compares the impact of oil and gas prices shocks on the NPLs of commercial and Islamic banks and also at the aggregate level in any of the oil economies. Thus, this study provides the first empirical evidence on distinct direct and indirect channels through which oil and gas prices shocks may affect bank NPLs.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Abdulazeez Y.H. Saif-Alyousfi, Asish Saha and Rohani Md-Rus

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and compare the impact of oil and gas prices changes on bank deposits at the aggregate as well as at the level of commercial…

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365

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and compare the impact of oil and gas prices changes on bank deposits at the aggregate as well as at the level of commercial and Islamic banks in Qatar over the period 2000–2016.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the BankScope Database as well as bank-level balance sheet and financial statements data, the authors use one-step system GMM dynamic model to examine and compare the association between oil and gas prices changes with bank deposits in Qatar. The authors also test hypotheses of direct and indirect impacts of oil and gas prices changes on bank deposits.

Findings

The results indicate that oil and gas prices changes have a direct impact on deposits of banks at the aggregate level in Qatar. However, the authors find that oil and gas price changes significantly affect deposits of Qatari commercial banks directly prompting enhanced lending by banks and the consequent business activities in the economy, while their impact on the deposits of Qatari Islamic banks is indirect, i.e. the impact is permeated through the macroeconomic and institutional characteristics of the country that are reinforced by the growing expectations and commercial sentiment of the country. The authors find that significant association between oil price changes and deposit growth during the global financial crisis 2008 has been distorted. However, the authors find that there was a sharp rise in the deposits of Islamic banks during the period of global financial crisis.

Practical implications

The results of this study necessitate policy measures that can counter the effects of changes in oil and gas prices on the effectiveness of bank deposits.

Originality/value

It is widely recognized that oil and gas prices and the level of production are of great importance to the economic development of oil and gas exporting countries. So far, however, no econometric study has been reported in the literature which analyses and compares the impact of oil and gas prices changes on bank deposits of commercial and Islamic banks and also at the aggregate level in any of the oil-exporting economies. Thus, this study provides the first empirical evidence on distinct direct and indirect channels through which oil and gas prices changes may affect bank deposits.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2021

Tamanna Dalwai, Gopalakrishnan Chinnasamy and Syeeda Shafiya Mohammadi

The readability of annual reports is an important feature that determines the quality of communication between a firm and its stakeholders. Extant literature has…

Abstract

Purpose

The readability of annual reports is an important feature that determines the quality of communication between a firm and its stakeholders. Extant literature has demonstrated that readability characteristics of annual reports are crucial in facilitating the investor's ability to process and analyze information, resulting in higher firm performance and lower agency costs. This study examines the relationship between annual report readability, agency costs and the firm performance of listed financial sector companies in Oman.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 150 firm-year observations of listed financial sector companies on the Muscat Securities Market (MSM) over the period 2014 to 2018, a panel regression analysis is used, along with the system generalized method of moments (GMM) estimation to address endogeneity concerns. The readability of annual reports is proxied by the length of the annual report, the Flesch reading ease and the Flesch–Kincaid index.

Findings

The ordinary least squares (OLS) results suggest that readability proxied by the length of the annual report has no significant relationship with agency cost, return on assets (ROA) or stock returns. The OLS results are confirmed through the system GMM estimation model for agency costs, Tobin's Q and stock returns. Easier-to-read annual reports measured by the Flesch reading ease demonstrate high asset utilization ratio and Tobin's Q. These results emphasize Flesch reading ease measure in explaining the economic significance of agency cost and Tobin's Q. In contrast, difficult-to-read annual reports are observed for firms with high ROA.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to the financial sector. Its generalizability could be extended to a similar sector or countries with features similar to Oman. Future studies on readability could be extended to other sectors of Oman, and financial firms with easier-to-read annual reports show a high Tobin's Q, which reflects the confidence of investors in the stock market. These findings may encourage policymakers to regulate the readability features of annual reports and influence the reporting quality of financials and disclosures also including cross-country comparisons.

Practical implications

Financial firms with easier-to-read annual reports show a high Tobin's Q, which reflects the confidence of investors in the stock market. These findings may encourage policymakers to regulate the readability features of annual reports and influence the reporting quality of financials and disclosures.

Originality/value

While the study extends prior literature on readability, agency costs and firm performance, it is also one of the first to examine the financial sector of an emerging country, namely, Oman. The study supports the obfuscation hypothesis through the association of readability measure with agency cost. Unlike prior research that has focused on common computational linguistic literature, this study uses three proxies for readability to assess information quality.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

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Article
Publication date: 27 October 2021

Neha Seth, Monica Singhania and Saif Siddiqui

The paper aims to resolve the ongoing issue of asset pricing in indexed based investments, primarily in Sukuks. It is to be done by modeling the returns of S&P MENA…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to resolve the ongoing issue of asset pricing in indexed based investments, primarily in Sukuks. It is to be done by modeling the returns of S&P MENA (Middle East and North Africa) Sukuk index (SPS), S&P MENA bonds indices (SPM) and Dow Jones MENA (DJM) equity index using system equations and to find out cointegration among them.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, daily data of stated regional market indices, from the month July 2013 to June 2017, are analyzed using the cointegration model and Generalized Method of Moments (GMM) estimation.

Findings

Findings revealed through cointegration test that indices are found to be not integrated in the long run; however, in short run, DJM is having one way relation with other two indices, and SPM and SPS are having unidirectional relation. The results of the GMM model show that SPS is significant in influencing SPM and vice-versa, and rest other variables are insignificant in influencing each other systems equations.

Originality/value

There is ample work available on various Islamic indices, but there is no study found on the MENA (Middle East and North Africa) Equity, MENA Bond and MENA Sukuk indices together.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

Keywords

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