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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Lois Bartelme

The purpose of this paper is to describe the viewpoints of two leaders in bridging the world of the arts and the world of business in order to enhance organizational

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the viewpoints of two leaders in bridging the world of the arts and the world of business in order to enhance organizational success. Harvey Seifter from the Arts and Business Council and Tim Stockil, formerly a director of Creative Development for Arts & Business in the UK, discuss the history, development and current status of the relationships between businesspeople and artists.

Design/methodology/approach

The author conducted separate interviews with Seifter and Stockil and summarizes their perspectives.

Findings

The relationship between business and arts has changed from business sponsorship of the arts to include the application of knowledge and expertise in the creative process to the solutions of business problems. The scope of artistic skills and arts‐based applications is wide ranging and impacts culture change in organizations. The interviewees explain how skills utilized by artists such as team building, feedback and rehearsing contribute to success. They examine the barriers, such as concern for ROI and risk avoidance, impacting the transference of artistic knowledge to business endeavors. Stockil and Seifter conclude by examining the role of creativity in shaping the future of business.

Practical implications

The paper should be of interest to corporate executives, organizational development professionals and human performance improvement specialists who are seeking new approaches to solving workplace issues.

Originality/value

This paper describes insights from two of the primary leaders in building bridges between business and the arts. It provides descriptions and case studies that illustrate the creative application of artistic skills and processes to solving organizational problems.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Harvey Seifter

The purpose of this paper is to give the reader a first‐hand view of why and how a major global corporation uses arts‐based learning, from the perspective of its Chairman and CEO.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to give the reader a first‐hand view of why and how a major global corporation uses arts‐based learning, from the perspective of its Chairman and CEO.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is an interview with Harold (Terry) McGraw III, Chairman and CEO of The McGraw Hill Companies, discussing the value of arts‐based learning to his corporation.

Findings

Mr McGraw characterizes creativity as a “business imperative,” and puts The McGraw Hill Companies’ successful experiences with arts‐based learning in a broad strategic context of “surfacing creativity” through engagement with the arts.

Originality/value

The McGraw Hill Companies is a global pioneer in the use of arts‐based learning to train leaders, help employees solve problems creatively, and foster personal growth; and is one of America's leading corporate supporters of the arts. Mr McGraw is a leader of unique stature and credibility, and with this interview, he becomes perhaps the most senior business leader in the world to discuss arts‐based learning in business from a perspective of direct experience.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Ted Buswick and Harvey Seifter

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Harvey Seifter and Ted Buswick

429

Abstract

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Nick Nissley

This article offers an up‐to‐date overview of the emergent practice of arts‐based learning in business. First, arts‐based learning is situated within the broader arts in

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Abstract

Purpose

This article offers an up‐to‐date overview of the emergent practice of arts‐based learning in business. First, arts‐based learning is situated within the broader arts in business context as well as our present reality of the economic downturn. Then, the article shares why arts‐based learning has emerged as a new pedagogy in management education. Next, a working definition of arts‐based learning is shared as well as an exploration of how others are conceiving it. Lastly, the article turns attention to the question, what are the strengths and limitations of arts‐based learning, and suggests a couple leading‐edge management education programs that are framed by arts‐based learning approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

In addition to the author's expertise in arts‐based learning and his role as executive of one of the world's premier institution's of arts‐based learning in management education/leadership development, the author exchanges ideas with a number of prominent business leaders, artists and respected management educators from around the globe, whose comments about arts‐based learning in business color the ideas presented in the article – adding texture and a richer perspective.

Findings

This article directly addresses what has changed since the 2005 special edition of the Journal of Business Strategy. Of course – the economic downturn. And, now, more than ever, this article asserts, that leaders are looking to arts‐inspired creativity, as a means to realize the upside of the downturn. The article asserts an integral role for the arts to play in an organization's efforts to create a culture of innovation – which is central to business strategy in the economic downturn. More specifically, the article documents how new ways of working together in business (resultant from the continued emergence and growth of the knowledge economy) will require new ways of learning how to work together. This article suggests that arts‐based learning may offer such a new way of learning how to work together.

Originality/value

This article affords the reader insights to how arts‐based learning may enable your strategic actions and the innovation upturn that you're being asked to deliver.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Harvey Seifter and Ted Buswick

976

Abstract

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Lotte Darsø

Arts‐based learning in business is a young field. Few businesspeople are aware of the opportunities to learn about it. This article takes an international look at the most

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Abstract

Purpose

Arts‐based learning in business is a young field. Few businesspeople are aware of the opportunities to learn about it. This article takes an international look at the most prominent programs that bring together businesspeople, artists, and academics in various combinations.

Design/methodology/approach

Over the past several years, the author has interviewed people active in the field in the USA and Europe. This survey article brings together her findings.

Findings

There are many opportunities for learning. Some bring artists and businesspeople together; some combine academics, artists, and businesspeople; and within the academic community there are many opportunities for artists and academics.

Practical implications

Businesspeople will learn and take advantage of learning opportunities.

Originality/value

The author has not seen such a survey published elsewhere.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Graeme Thomson

To show that: as leaders refine business performance, they are increasingly focusing on human capital performance – how leaders and teams deliver outstanding performance

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Abstract

Purpose

To show that: as leaders refine business performance, they are increasingly focusing on human capital performance – how leaders and teams deliver outstanding performance and productivity. Leaders who are paying practical attention to the inner aspects of behavior are often reporting strong cultural shifts in individual engagement and collaborative teamwork affecting all aspects of company performance. These personal aspects of performance can be effectively addressed using the experiential techniques and approaches common to the arts and performing arts.

Design/methodology/approach

This article describes the case of Harcourt Assessment, a large education testing and publishing business, which underwent a dramatic business turnaround in 2006‐07. This article is based on analysis of the change methodology adopted by Harcourt Assessment and its consulting firm, The TAI Group, in 2006‐2007, extensive interviews of key executive participants in the engagement, and analysis of the firm's employee survey in 2007.

Findings

Participants in the turnaround of Harcourt Assessment were consistent in their assessment that the deliberate adoption of a change strategy focusing on individual motivators and collaborative group alignment using a creative, performing arts‐based approach was critical to the project's success. These evaluations were also consistent with the attitudinal changes reported in the 2007 employee satisfaction survey of views on senior team performance, teamwork and collaboration, strategy and trust.

Originality/value

The case study and findings demonstrate the measurable value of adopting a practical, disciplined approach to profound corporate culture change based on the experiential principles of the performing arts. This approach, with individual motivations and behavior at the core, can be critical to creating an aligned culture capable of delivering sustained high performance.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Ted Buswick

To convey the potential of hidden benefits in well‐selected arts‐based training – in this particular instance, theatrically‐based training.

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Abstract

Purpose

To convey the potential of hidden benefits in well‐selected arts‐based training – in this particular instance, theatrically‐based training.

Design/methodology/approach

A leading international consultancy put numerous vice presidents through training with The Actors Institute (TAI) over about ten years. This paper is an interview with a leading consultant who frequently gives presentations that had been consistently rated highly by his audiences before he began attending. After ten years, he still periodically returns to TAI for assistance.

Findings

The original intent was to improve presentations. In fact, participants gained a better sense for dealing with all kinds of audiences, extending to client engagements and personal situations.

Practical implications

Many executives don't feel the need for training when they hit a certain level. When the training is based on developmental skills and is over an extended period rather than a brief one‐time experience, and the training organization wisely chosen, there can be long‐term benefits that go beyond expectations.

Originality/value

George Stalk is highly respected. He has not previously spoken out on this topic. His first‐hand experiences can influence many other businesspeople to potential benefits of arts‐based training that they had not recognized.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Kevin Daum

This paper relates the connection and influence of arts‐based training and practical experience to entrepreneurial endeavors.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper relates the connection and influence of arts‐based training and practical experience to entrepreneurial endeavors.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper was based upon anecdotal examples as well as author‐performed surveys and inquiries examining entrepreneurs who have arts backgrounds and use arts practices in their businesses.

Findings

Many entrepreneurs have backgrounds in the arts and apply those practices in their businesses. Universities separately teach related arts practices and business practices in their respective departments but rarely combine the efforts in an interdisciplinary manner.

Practical implications

By creating interdisciplinary approaches between arts and entrepreneurship, benefits can be achieved in both areas in the universities, small businesses and large‐scale corporate arenas.

Originality/value

This paper is possibly the first to suggest a direct correlation between arts training and entrepreneurial endeavors. Businesspeople may be inspired to examine the arts world as a resource for training in entrepreneurship and initiative. Entrepreneurs may be inspired to explore the arts for training.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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