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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Kenneth Andrew Searle, Liz Ellis, Marianthi Kourti, Andrea MacLeod, Caroline Lear, Callum Duckworth, Davide Irvine, Harry Jones, Michaela King, Jessica Ling and John Simpson

The purpose of this paper is to address the benefits of a participatory approach to autism research, demonstrating the positive effects of giving autistic project assistants (PAs…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the benefits of a participatory approach to autism research, demonstrating the positive effects of giving autistic project assistants (PAs) the opportunity to design and undertake a project researching the experiences of autistic university students.

Design/methodology/approach

A participatory approach was implemented, engaging autistic university students as research assistants. All the research team except project co-ordinators were autistic. Undergraduate autistic students developed and conducted a set of semi-structured interviews, with two autistic alumni responsible for data analysis and both scheduling and moderating focus groups. Participation in dissemination of the findings was open to all.

Findings

The results included in this paper reflect a portion of the overall findings, specifically regarding the participatory approach. The findings of the study indicate the perceptions of respondents being interviewed by autistic researchers in relation to their shared understanding, facilitating positive feelings and a sense of rapport in the interview process. The PAs were able to improve their research skills through the project, which contributed constructively to their CV and allowed them to feel more positive about being autistic, and specifically about being an autistic researcher.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to discuss the challenges and benefits of including autistic participant researchers at all stages of the research project, including research design, data collection, analysis and dissemination, being co-written by both project co-ordinators and autistic project researchers.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Michael Mazzeo and Greg Merkley

In December 2011 the Lego Group (TLG) announced the launch of Lego Friends, the company’s sixth attempt to market a product to girls. Lego Friends, which was supported by a $40…

Abstract

In December 2011 the Lego Group (TLG) announced the launch of Lego Friends, the company’s sixth attempt to market a product to girls. Lego Friends, which was supported by a $40 million global marketing campaign, was designed to introduce the fun of building with Lego bricks to girls, who represented less than 10 percent of Lego’s audience.

The company’s poorly executed brand extensions and move from free-form building sets to story-driven kits had nearly cost it its independence in 2004, so the launch of Lego Friends was strategically important. However, within hours of the product’s appearance it was heavily criticized for reinforcing gender stereotypes and damaging the valuable Lego brand.

Jørgen Vig Knudstorp, CEO since 2004, had saved TLG and ushered in an era of sales growth with a series of successful strategic initiatives. Would Lego Friends be another addition to TLG’s graveyard of failed products for girls, or would it prove popular and finally enable the company to double its sales and profits by reaching this segment?

After analyzing the case, students should be able to:

  • Understand the connection between a firm’s assets and its activities

  • Identify new resources and capabilities required for a change in strategic focus

  • Recognize the consequences of poorly matched assets and market opportunities

Understand the connection between a firm’s assets and its activities

Identify new resources and capabilities required for a change in strategic focus

Recognize the consequences of poorly matched assets and market opportunities

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

Colin Jones, Harry Matlay and Alex Maritz

The purpose of this paper is to provocatively enter four imagined worlds of enterprise education with the express aim of contemplating an emerging future. The authors do so not to…

1990

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provocatively enter four imagined worlds of enterprise education with the express aim of contemplating an emerging future. The authors do so not to expressly determine what positioning is most appropriate for enterprise/entrepreneurship education, but rather to consider the issues associated with each of the four imagined worlds.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors’ approach is built around a combination of cycles of reflective practice and the use of scenario development processes. The authors seek to suspend their collective judgement whilst entering the four imagined worlds, but ultimately do not claim to have hidden their personal biases.

Findings

It is concluded that enterprise/entrepreneurship education should be shared across the university and not owned by any school or faculty. While the authors find it difficult to dismiss the underlying purpose of each scenario, they sense an opportunity to unite their common focus on the development of a transformative student experience.

Practical implications

This process has provided unexpected insights into the potential of scenario planning as a tool that could conceivably be employed more often to tackle complex issues, such as the positioning of enterprise/entrepreneurship education in Higher Education.

Originality/value

This paper, despite its inherent biases, offers the reader an opportunity to gain a sense of the various roles forced upon enterprise/entrepreneurship education by its various key stakeholders. In doing so, the shortcomings of the current situation are highlighted.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 54 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Colin Jones, Harry Matlay, Kathryn Penaluna and Andy Penaluna

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of enterprise educators working collectively to develop a unique scholarship of teaching. The authors argue that the time…

1236

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of enterprise educators working collectively to develop a unique scholarship of teaching. The authors argue that the time is right for educators in this domain to secure the future of enterprise education. Acknowledging the debate between “entrepreneurship education” and “enterprise education,” the authors set out to develop a unification model through which educators can act collectively to demonstrate the leadership required to secure the autonomy of the domain.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors bring several pertinent ideas (pedagogical content knowledge, heutagogy and academagogy) to the attention of academics/researchers involved in the design, development and delivery of enterprise education. The innovative approach to combine these ideas with prevailing thinking in this domain has facilitated a model for collective action.

Findings

It is at the level of the shared philosophical positions that the authors can best cooperate to shape the future direction of enterprise education. The authors argue against dwelling upon how the authors differ in terms of context and process issues. Such matters can only fragment the theory and practice of enterprise education. The authors need to develop greater appreciation of shared philosophical positions and leverage this understanding into a unique scholarship of teaching, specific to enterprise education.

Practical implications

As enterprise education becomes more global, it is also likely to become more attractive to business schools that long for a new positioning tool in the increasingly overcrowded markets that they compete in.

Originality/value

This paper encourages enterprise educators to reflect upon the knowledge they hold of their own practice, and that of other enterprise educators.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 56 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 November 2011

Colin Jones and Harry Matlay

This paper seeks to draw attention to the importance of appreciating and using ever‐present diversity to achieve increased legitimacy for entrepreneurship education. As such, it…

2492

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to draw attention to the importance of appreciating and using ever‐present diversity to achieve increased legitimacy for entrepreneurship education. As such, it aims to draw the reader into a reflective process of discovery as to why entrepreneurship education is important and how such importance can be prolonged.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper revisits Gartner's 1985 conceptual framework for understanding the complexity of entrepreneurship. The paper proposes an alternative framework based on the logic of Gartner's framework to advance the understanding of entrepreneurship education. The authors discuss the dimensions of the proposed framework and explain the nature of the dialogic relations contained within.

Findings

It is argued that the proposed conceptual framework provides a new way to understand ever‐present heterogeneity related to the development and delivery of entrepreneurship education.

Practical implications

The paper extends an invitation to the reader to audit their own involvement and proximity to entrepreneurship education. It argues that increased awareness of the value that heterogeneity plays in student learning outcomes and programme branding is directly related to the presence of heterogeneity across the dimensions of the conceptual framework.

Originality/value

The paper introduces a simple yet powerful means of understanding what factors contribute to the success or otherwise of developing and delivering entrepreneurship education. The simplicity of the approach suggested provides all entrepreneurship educators with the means to audit all facets of their programme.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 53 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1934

34. Ground mustard seed, mustard meal, is the unbolted, ground mustard seed and conforms to the standards for mustard seed.

Abstract

34. Ground mustard seed, mustard meal, is the unbolted, ground mustard seed and conforms to the standards for mustard seed.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 22 November 2011

Amanda Jones and Paul Jones

This paper aims to explore the issues experienced in the delivery of a business challenge to a cohort of business undergraduate students at the University of Glamorgan. The…

1131

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the issues experienced in the delivery of a business challenge to a cohort of business undergraduate students at the University of Glamorgan. The challenge involved initiating and running a “real” business and returning a profit within a week. The students worked in groups of up to eight and were given start up capital. The paper seeks to evaluate the impact of the business challenge in terms of changing entrepreneurial attitudes and behaviour, and to examine the skills competencies acquired by the individual students.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs a mixed method approach to examine the respondent experience. The basis of the investigation involved a semi‐structured questionnaire undertaken on completion of the challenge. In total, in excess of 50 students completed the research instrument. The questionnaire enabled the authors to quantitatively explore the overall impact of the business challenge by student age and gender. In addition, the semi structured design enabled the authors to explore the qualitative “rich data” of individual student experience based on their reflections.

Findings

The findings reveal a positive impact in terms of enhanced attitudes towards the attainability and attractiveness of an entrepreneurial career. The findings reveal that the business challenge provided the students with a significant enhancement in generic enterprise skills including team working, leadership, communication and specific business skills such as sales and marketing behaviour. The students valued the opportunity and personal responsibility offered by the business challenge to apply their theoretical knowledge in a real world context. Several individuals reported that the positive experience with their business venture meant that they wished to continue the business alongside their graduate studies.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to a limited literature in assessing the impact and benefit of business challenges. It will be of value to enterprise education providers in organising and planning such activities.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 53 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Paul Jones and Amanda Jones

Given the high unemployment rates being experienced by graduates, the importance of small business start-up has increased significantly, with greater priority being placed upon…

2943

Abstract

Purpose

Given the high unemployment rates being experienced by graduates, the importance of small business start-up has increased significantly, with greater priority being placed upon the development of entrepreneurial skills across the educational sector. However, there is a limited literature considering the student experience and issues involved with supporting non-Business discipline students attaining entrepreneurial competencies. The purpose of this paper is to explore the attitudes and experience of Sports Development and Sports Management students towards entrepreneurship education, highlighting best practice from a pedagogical perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Over 120 Sports Development and Sports Management students on an undergraduate degree were interviewed over a two year period using a semi-structured research instrument. The focus and content of the questionnaire was developed from prior studies undertaken in the field, measuring the impact and value of entrepreneurship education upon attitudes, knowledge and career choice.

Findings

The results found that Sports Development and Sports Management students were typically enterprising by nature due to their prior experience in coaching and training within their respective sports disciplines. The majority of students indicated that they were attracted to a future entrepreneurial career in a sports-related discipline. This was driven by the potential of an entrepreneurial career option and the limited alternative choices. Sports Development and Sports Management students were characterised by their mature attitudes towards their career development and future inclination regarding an entrepreneurial career choice.

Practical implications

The results will inform the teaching of entrepreneurship education to non-Business discipline specialist students in terms of the effective construction of entrepreneurship curriculum. Best practice in terms of customised subject informed teaching material, guest talks and interactive pedagogical practice are highlighted.

Originality/value

This study will be of interest to entrepreneurship education providers delivering content to non-Business disciplines at all levels and aid them in the construction of their curriculum to provide fit for purpose provision.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 56 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Willie Seal and Peter Vincent‐Jones

The enabling role of accounting in supporting classical contractual exchange has been extensively analysed in agency theory. In contrast, analyses the role of accounting in…

3652

Abstract

The enabling role of accounting in supporting classical contractual exchange has been extensively analysed in agency theory. In contrast, analyses the role of accounting in enabling empirically important and welfare‐enhancing long‐term relations which rely on trust and co‐operation rather than legal remedies. Under what circumstances does accounting strengthen, weaken or even destroy the trust which underpins relations both within and between organizations? What are the implications for accountability? Explores these general questions in the contrasting contexts of compulsory contracting policies in UK local government and the transition from socialism in Eastern Europe.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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