Search results

1 – 10 of 15
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Harriette Bettis-Outland and Monica D. Guillory

This paper aims to illustrate the interface between emotional intelligence (EI), trust and organizational learning in the context of a trade show environment.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to illustrate the interface between emotional intelligence (EI), trust and organizational learning in the context of a trade show environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Theoretical underpinnings of this conceptual study include appraisal theory of emotions. Propositions are presented that suggest positive relationships between antecedent variables, EI and trust, contrasted with the dependent variable, organizational learning.

Findings

Organizational learning is generally considered to be a benign activity, created by the acquisition and dissemination of new information. The outcome of organizational learning is the development of new knowledge that ultimately results in a shared interpretation among members of the organization. This paper suggests that a lack of EI, defined as “the ability to perceive and express emotion, assimilate emotion in thought, understand and reason with emotion, and regulate emotion in the self and others” (Mayer et al., 2000, p. 396), casts doubt on the motives of newly acquired information. Consequently, low levels of EI can inhibit the acceptance of new information, leading to a reduction of learning by the organization.

Originality/value

This paper extends the concept of organizational learning by incorporating EI and trust as antecedents of organizational learning. Previous research suggests a direct relationship between information acquisition, dissemination and organizational learning. This study implies that other factors can intervene after information is acquired, thereby affecting whether newly acquired information is fully incorporated into the organizational learning process.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 June 2020

Harriette Bettis-Outland, Roberto Mora Cortez and Wesley J. Johnston

This paper aims to evaluate the behavior of micro and macro business networks in a trade show context. The following questions are addressed: How do business networks…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate the behavior of micro and macro business networks in a trade show context. The following questions are addressed: How do business networks impact organizational learning at trade shows? Can relational ties between networks influence organizational learning? Does trust play a role between different network types and organizational learning?

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical framework for this research is based on the broad spectrum of social exchange theory (Cropanzano and Mitchell, 2005; Foa and Foa, 1974, 1980; Kelley and Thibault, 1978; Kelley, 1997). Social exchange theory has several different interpretations; one common view of this theory involves a series of interactions that result in obligations for the participating members (Emerson, 1976; Cropanzano and Mitchell, 2005). This model extends the Levin and Cross (2004) model presented in their article, “strength of weak ties you can trust: the mediating role of trust in effective knowledge transfer”.

Findings

This paper is a review and synthesis of trade show, trust, organizational learning and business network literature. This conceptual paper concludes with eight propositions, which delve into connections between micro and macro networks, strong and weak ties in these networks and the effect on organizational learning. Trust is the mediating variable between networks and organizational learning. High levels of trust could change the learning approach (adaptive, generative or transformative) of the different networks.

Research limitations/implications

The propositions integrate extant research on trade shows and will guide future research regarding the relationship between types of business networks, trust and organizational learning.

Practical implications

This conceptual paper looks at trade shows from a network perspective; specifically, how do trade show networks impact organizational learning. Trade show participation results in different approaches to organizational learning, which can be modified based on the level of trust that exists between network members. Trade show participation enables both adaptive and generative learning. However, atypical interactions between business networks occasionally produce transformative learning.

Originality/value

This conceptual paper offers an innovative approach to trade show research by analyzing the relationship between trade shows and organizational learning from a network perspective, using trust as the mediating variable.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Harriette Bettis‐Outland, Wesley J. Johnston and R. Dale Wilson

This paper seeks to provide an exploratory empirical study of the variables that are part of the return on trade show information (RTSI) concept, which is based on the use…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide an exploratory empirical study of the variables that are part of the return on trade show information (RTSI) concept, which is based on the use and value of information gathered at a trade show.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is designed to explore relationships and identify those variables that are a particularly important part of the RTSI concept. The paper provides an exploratory test of the relationship between a series of variables that are related to the value of information gathered at trade shows. Data were collected from trade show attendees approximately 60 days after the trade show. A multiple regression model was developed that explores the relationship between the dependent variable that focuses on information value and the independent variables on various aspects of information acquisition, information dissemination, and information use.

Findings

The final multiple regression model found a significant relationship for several variables and has an adjusted R2 value of 0.552. Four significant independent variables were identified – one each in the information use and the shared information categories and two in the information acquisition category. These findings present an interesting picture of how information is used within an organization after it is acquired at a trade show.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited by the multiple regression model used to explore the relationships in the data. Also, data from only one trade show were used in the model.

Practical implications

This paper focuses on the intangible, longer‐term benefits as important considerations when determining the value of new trade show information to the firm. The evaluation of trade show information also should include these intangible benefits, such as improved interdepartmental relations or interactions as well as discussions with other trade show participants in finding new uses for information that impacts the company's future success, as well as shorter‐term benefits such as booth activity.

Originality/value

The paper offers a unique approach for determining the value of information acquired at trade shows. Though information gathering has been included as an outcome variable in previous trade show studies, no other research has studied the value of this new trade show information to the company.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2019

R. Dale Wilson and Harriette Bettis-Outland

Artificial neural network (ANN) models, part of the discipline of machine learning and artificial intelligence, are becoming more popular in the marketing literature and…

Abstract

Purpose

Artificial neural network (ANN) models, part of the discipline of machine learning and artificial intelligence, are becoming more popular in the marketing literature and in marketing practice. This paper aims to provide a series of tests between ANN models and competing predictive models.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 46 pairs of models were evaluated in an objective model-building environment. Either logistic regression or multiple regression models were developed and then were compared to ANN models using the same set of input variables. Three sets of B2B data were used to test the models. Emphasis also was placed on evaluating small samples.

Findings

ANN models tend to generate model predictions that are more accurate or the same as logistic regression models. However, when ANN models are compared to multiple regression models, the results are mixed. For small sample sizes, the modeling results are the same as for larger samples.

Research limitations/implications

Like all marketing research, this application is limited by the methods and the data used to conduct the research. The findings strongly suggest that, because of their predictive accuracy, ANN models will have an important role in the future of B2B marketing research and model-building applications.

Practical implications

ANN models should be carefully considered for potential use in marketing research and model-building applications by B2B academics and practitioners alike.

Originality/value

The research contributes to the B2B marketing literature by providing a more rigorous test on ANN models using B2B data than has been conducted before.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Dr Harriette Bettis-Outland

Abstract

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 April 2010

Harriette Bettis-Outland and Aberdeen Leila Borders

Abstract

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 July 2012

Anja Geigenmüller and Harriette Bettis‐Outland

This paper's aim is to provide a conceptual framework explaining drivers of service brand equity. It refers to the trade show industry as an example for an international…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper's aim is to provide a conceptual framework explaining drivers of service brand equity. It refers to the trade show industry as an example for an international, highly competitive environment, where service providers face the challenge to differentiate themselves from competing brands. Based on a comprehensive literature review, the paper develops a conceptual model of service brand equity. The paper concludes with directions for further research and managerial implications.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a conceptual work, which derives research propositions from an extended literature review.

Findings

It is proposed that a service provider's competence relates positively to a service customer's purchasing value which, in turn, leads to customer service satisfaction and service brand equity. The paper further posits that the provider's service concept, service processes, and service system are constituents of service competence, thus representing crucial determinants of service brand equity.

Research limitations/implications

The research has limitations that are due to the exploratory nature of the work. The paper suggests opportunities for further research, particularly an empirical test of the model in various B2B service industries.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that the value attendees derive from using trade show services is strongly related to the support they receive in establishing and nurturing customer relationships or in engaging in market and competitor analysis. Considering service brand equity, trade show organizations should therefore develop innovative concepts for trade shows that accommodate their clients' needs, including an appropriate physical environment, customer‐oriented service processes, and high‐quality interactions between service employees and customers.

Originality/value

The paper sheds light on a phenomenon that, despite its increasing acceptance among practitioners, remains unexplored by marketing research. By providing a better understanding of B2B service brand equity in a trade show context, the paper enriches research on trade fair issues.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 April 2010

Harriette Bettis‐Outland, Jane S. Cromartie, Wesley J. Johnston and Aberdeen Leila Borders

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the need for developing a return on trade show information (RTSI) index; this index would be used to measure the impact of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the need for developing a return on trade show information (RTSI) index; this index would be used to measure the impact of information gathered at trade shows on long‐term decision making within the organization. Also, the paper aims to suggest differences in how exhibitors and visitors perceive tangible versus intangible benefits that accrue as a result of utilizing new information acquired at trade shows.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilizes a conceptual approach, employing the market orientation framework to develop a model for the return on trade show information (RTSI). It incorporates the acquisition, dissemination and utilization of new trade show information, suggesting that perceived information quality acts as a moderator in this relationship.

Findings

The return on trade show information (RTSI) index describes both tangible and intangible benefits that accrue to the organization as a result of information acquired at trade shows. However, in some cases the same information that is acquired at trade shows is also available from alternative sources, potentially making it difficult to determine true RTSI.

Originality/value

The manuscript offers an innovative perspective for estimating the value of new information acquired at trade shows, suggesting differences in the way in which exhibitors and visitors perceive, as well as utilize, trade show information. This opens the door to future research in the area of trade show information value; in addition, this can benefit practitioners by providing a different method for evaluating the investment value of trade show participation.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Jürgen Kai‐Uwe Brock and Josephine Yu Zhou

The term customer intimacy has been used both in academia and business, albeit lacking clear definition and empirical validation. The authors in this paper aim to develop…

Abstract

Purpose

The term customer intimacy has been used both in academia and business, albeit lacking clear definition and empirical validation. The authors in this paper aim to develop a measure of customer intimacy in business‐to‐business contexts and to assess its reliability and validity, as well as its relevance, within a nomological relationship marketing network.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi‐method (qualitative/exploratory and quantitative/confirmatory structural modelling), multi‐staged (test, re‐test) research approach is used and applied in the UK and Germany.

Findings

The results show that customer intimacy is a second order construct reflected by the three formative dimensions of mutual understanding, closeness, and value perception. The results also show that customer intimacy is a relevant relationship indicator, distinct from the central relationship indicators of trust and commitment. It impacts relationship commitment levels, customer induced word‐of‐mouth, repurchase intentions, information disclosure, customer availability, and leads to an advisor status with the customer. Moreover, customer intimacy mediates relationship marketing's central trust commitment link.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitations that should be addressed by future studies are: reliance on the key informant technique on one side of the supplier‐buyer dyad; cross‐sectional design.

Practical implications

This study shows that achieving and managing customer intimacy is a relevant managerial goal and task for firms and shows managers how it can be measured and managed.

Originality/value.

This study, for the first time, presents a measure for customer intimacy and assesses its quality and impact empirically. The measure will be of significant value in making customer‐centric, relationship management approaches more accountable.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Christian Felzensztein, Eli Gimmon and Claudio Aqueveque

This paper aims to focus on the perceived role of clusters in inter‐firm cooperation and social networks.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on the perceived role of clusters in inter‐firm cooperation and social networks.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was carried out in a region of Latin America where limited research has been conducted in terms of inter‐firm relationships. Managers from three key natural resources‐based industries in Chile participated in the survey; one of these industries constituted a well‐defined cluster whereas the other two did not. The survey assessed managers' perceptions of the benefits and opportunities of inter‐firm cooperation in strategic marketing activities.

Findings

Results support the advantages of clusters. Managers of firms which are part of clustered industries tend to perceive more benefits and opportunities for inter‐firm co‐operation in marketing activities. Additionally, significant differences between clustered and non‐clustered industries in terms of their co‐operation behavior and objectives were found.

Research limitations/implications

The findings shed light on strategies for the enhancement of inter‐firm cooperation in marketing, of particular value for marketers in small‐and‐medium sized enterprises. The paper suggests establishing new clusters and promoting more regional clusters policies since clustering seems to provide better and positive inter‐firm interaction leading to cooperation.

Practical implications

There are lessons to be learned at national and regional levels for Latin American and emerging economies fostering new industry cluster policies.

Originality/value

Clustered firms and industries may result in more innovative marketing strategies at both local and international levels than non‐clustered firms. The authors encourage regional development bodies to foster more cooperation among firms and trade associations.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

1 – 10 of 15